Where do I plug THIS in??! connection help

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kathy C., Sep 19, 2002.

  1. Kathy C.

    Kathy C. Agent

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    I've posted re:cables and wires. Now I need a little {lot} more help with actually connecting them.
    I've reviewed other posts about this, and getting more confused.

    I have Denon 2802
    Sony rear projection-hdtv ready (new)
    vcr-composite
    CD-composite-analog
    DVD-optical (orange),component, component, analog
    phono, tape player
    coax cable connection--no cable box

    I would like to be able just to turn on the tv and watch it without going through a lot of manuvers, but I want the best available connections for all. Budget pretty tight.
    I've been looking at NXG and AR cables, etc.

    I"m confused on cable terminology, and video being separate from audio, and what's best map of connections.
    The Denon book is making it worse.


    1. Where should I connect the coax cable --receiver, tv, etc.?

    2. Currently, I'm using the old interconnects (is that right term) for cd player and tape deck. If needed, what would I upgrade to. Would a gold connector make a difference?

    3. VCR-same here-using old cable I had. Denon says use "75/ohm video coaxial pin plug cord" for video in.
    Could someone gently explain what that is, and maybe give me a model #from NXG.

    4. I want to use component and optical connections here--is
    that the best? Do I hook this up through the receiver or tv?

    Please Help Me---Kathy
     
  2. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    This shouldn't be too bad. If you had the cable TV before, do it the same way. I have a splitter where the round 75 ohm 'F' connector enters the house. One goes to the TV, and the other to the VCR.

    You can either use the 'F' out or use the 3 composite cables (red/white/yellow) from the VCR to your TV - or you can send it to the receiver. This is your choice, but if you do that, you will have to get a 2nd set of these cables from the receiver 'out' to the TV in.

    The DVD player is a little different. The component cables (for the video) usually go to the TV. The audio cable goes to the receiver.

    Notes - the video cables are not the same as the ones for the VCR These are red/blue/green most of the time. They may have been supplied with your DVD player. If not, the best route is to get 3 yellow video cables from Radio Shack (of the right length).

    The audio is one cable. Either with an RCA plug like the cables above or with a toslink connector. (Both of them would have a small square plug on the back that snaps out). The DVD player and your receiver have to have the same connector, of course. They would be labeled digital input or something like that.

    I hope all of this helps!
    Glenn
     
  3. Kathy C.

    Kathy C. Agent

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    Thanks--what is a "toslink" connector?
    stupid question---tell me exactly what is an rca connector. Just a pin plug?

    Should I get a splitter for the tv cable? What is the advantage of having cable tv connected to both tv and receiver?

    thanks again--Kathy
     
  4. Jacques C

    Jacques C Stunt Coordinator

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    Kathy,
    Toslink is the optical digital out from your DVD player. The other type is usually referred to as digital coax.
    RCA connectors are the type you use to hook up your VCR to your TV. If you look here - http://home.new.rr.com/zaph/audio/audio-cables.html those are RCA hookups (that is a page about making them, but it has good pics of the connectors).
    The reason to split the connection is to have pristine sources to the VCR for recording and TV for viewing. I currently have my cable going to the VCR and then to the TV (I have a nice VCR that shows no degradation with regular SDTV - your VCR may be different and in that case splitting the cable signal is a good idea).
    I also have the video and audio going from the VCR to the receiver then to the TV. This way if I want to watch TV with my "real" speakers rather than the typical tinny TV speakers I can do that. Of course my wife thinks this is overkill, expecially when it happens to be football. [​IMG]
    The Denon is a great piece to build a system around, BTW.
    Hope it helps.
     
  5. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    RCA video is referred to as composite video.
    RCA audio is referred to as analog, the two are not interchangeable.
    There is NO advantage to hooking the cable TV to the receiver. Whenever possible, go directly from the source to the intended device, as in: DVD video should go straight to the TV, not loop through the receiver. The ONLY reason there are video connections on the receiver is for situations when you have insufficient video inputs on your TV and the receiver can serve as a sort of switch box. The video image is not improved, and actually exposes the signal to possible degradation due to additional connections and a high current device inline.
    OK, here we go:
    DVD Video - (best to worse) 1)Component video - 3RCA cable, 2) S-video - single, round "DIN" connector, 3) Composite (RCA) video. As I mentioned, the DVD video cable should go straight to the TV.
    DVD Audio output - 1)Coaxial or optical digital - basically the same, I prefer coaxial cable. 2) If your DVD has built in decoding or SACD/DVD-A, it will have multi-channel analog outputs (RCA - 5.1, 6.1, 7.1) and 3) Stereo analog (RCA) If you want to be able to watch DVDs with sound, without your stereo, you will need to connect the stereo analog outs to the TV as well as the other connection to the receiver.
    CD - if you only have stereo analog, this one is easy. [​IMG]
    VCR video - Straight to the TV. 1) S-video - some have it 2) composite - most have it 3) coaxial CATV cable - all have it. This cable carries both audio and video. I never paid attention to see if any VCRs have component video.
    VCR audio - All VCRs, aside from D-VHS, are stereo analog only. This one is getting tricky. If your VCR is hooked to the TV via coaxial cable, you will get both audio and video without the stereo, no need to connect the audio cables to the TV. If you use composite video connection, you WILL need to hook up the audio cables either to the TV or to the receiver, then the TV (but not the video), as Jacques C notes (do you have to turn on the receiver anyway?) or split the signal between the two. Since you say you have no coax connection, you will most likely want to use composite video and analog audio.
    Phono - phono.
    Tape - stereo analog.
    Good luck.[​IMG]
     
  6. Kathy C.

    Kathy C. Agent

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    This really helps...I'm feeling smarter.....well, until we got to the VCR part.

    Here's what I think I understand:

    Wall TV cable--splitter---coax to TV

    from splitter----coax to VCR----composite to
    TV

    DVD---video component -----TV
    Audio optical ---receiver

    TV---video component to receiver?
    optical to receiver?

    VCR--here I'm a little lost--I'd like to be able to turn on tv and watch without a lot of fuss; but also hear speakers without a lot of fuss...so what should I do--
    go to TV or Receiver then to TV.


    Is the orange connector the optical cable?
    I thought it was better than coax cable.

    Kathy
     
  7. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    OK:
     
  8. Kathy C.

    Kathy C. Agent

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    So, optical and dig coax are exactly the same only different connector--the dvd has the audio orange plug and analog plugs. Someone told me the orange was optical, so I'll be plugging in a dig. coax for audio.

    Your saying I don't need a switcher for the cable tv.

    My tv does have the on screen setup. It seems like I'm not using much on my receiver; all those component plug ins are going to waste. Would I be better off going through the receiver; is it difficult to learn the switching maneuvers? (that sounds pretty dumb}

    question about powered sub cable--should I use coax cable here with f connector or speaker wire?

    thanks..Kathy
     
  9. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    kathy, I'll take two shots here.

    Subwoofer cable uses two RCA plugs, one on each end. The absolute most economical way to go is buy a black 25-ft Radio Shack RG-6 coax which comes with molded F-terminals, $7. Then get two RadioShack F-to-RCA adapters, $3.70 ea. and attach. $15 you're done. The catch is whether 25 feet is sufficient for your sub run. Some custom stereo stores in town will build one for you to the exact length you need. Cost is just about the same, and they may even have RG-6 in decor white!

    John gave good advice in suggesting the DVD (3) component cables go direct to the tv. I looked at the Denon manual, and I believe you'll have NO issues running them thru the Denon. This will meet your ease of switching goal. Here's why.

    (In either case, DVD audio goes to the Denon). But if the video componets go directly to the tv, then to play you must switch the tv to the Video Input to get the DVD picture. That's one remote needed. Then you must switch or turn the Deno Source Input to the DVD mode. That makes two manuevers.

    Switching the DVD video components thru the Denon means you just leave the tv set on the one Video 1 or 2 or whatever. Turning Denon source mode to DVD gets you the sound and picture in one operation. The catch -- you will need to buy a second set of component cables to run from the Denon's MONITOR OUT to the same tv component inputs in the first method.

    Not having this Sony, I cannot say how you and family will have to tune the tv video inputs for regular cabletv programs and the occasional VCR tape. As you see, the Sony has a lot of switches too.

    bill
     
  10. Phill O

    Phill O Stunt Coordinator

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  11. Kathy C.

    Kathy C. Agent

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    that site really helps. I'm going to make myself order some cables today. One poster like NXG-they're really affordable...any comments?
     
  12. Kathy C.

    Kathy C. Agent

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    In regards to the dvd-tv connection; 2 options:

    DVD video component to tv or
    DVD video component to Receiver--rec. component to TV

    Hooking to the receiver will SAVE me maneuvers? So, I always turn on the receiver whenever I turn on the TV this way?

    If I just wanted to turn on the TV to catch some news or surf to see what's on, then when I found something to settle in with and wanted to hear through speakers....that's the connection I want.
    In this scenerio, what do I do,....I'm experiencing brainfuzz...


    Kathy
     
  13. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    TV stereo analog audio out -> Receiver, to listen to whatever is on the TV.

     
  14. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    kathy,

    I'll defer to John's analysis for direct DVD component to TV and save buying the second set of $15-$100 components.

    I suggest rereading the Sony manual to understand what its various video inputs are for, however Sony labels then: Video 1, Video 2 etc. and what setting for tv broadcast.

    This will take plugging in and seeing what gives.

    I knew you would encounter this, and tried to indicate in my last post that there will always be TV video input switching with its remote to tune into the Video modes for DVD, VCR, and cabletv.

    Are you saying you want a connection to turn on the TV and surf cabletv news, weather etc with just the tv's speakers. No problem. There has to be a connection thru the VCR and you wont have to turn the VCR on.

    The most direct route is plugging the cabletv black coax into VCR IN. It's an F-termional screw-on. Whatever else you do, you need this VCR IN connection to get the cabletv signal to make a tape of a tv program and to keep the VCR clock set. Then another length of black RG-6 type coax with F-terminals on both ends goes from VCR OUT to tv"s ANT IN a scew-on terminal. It may be ANT A, ANT B; just go for "A."

    That passes the tv sound and picture from the wall to the TV as if you had a splitter, which I dont like for its tho-small signal loss.

    You also want VCR red/white audio cables to the receiver and VCR video (yellow band) to the tv.

    With all of these connections, scroll thru the tv video modes to see how it works. If may be you can later just remove the VCR OUt-TV ANT IN cable but I doubt it.

    The THIRD way is using a splitter as the cable tv coax comes out of the wall. One to VCR IN the other to TV ANT IN. It's an option. In this case, you dont need that VCR OUT to TV IN black coax.

    bill (who just finished scrubbing the kitchen linoleum and is feeling huff-puff)
     
  15. Kathy C.

    Kathy C. Agent

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    I'm studying my TV manual again, and reviewing all of the above. These are the questions that come up:

    1. I have an older (about 5 years) VCR, with only analog/composite jacks, and cable/antenna. If I take the tv coax cable straight to my vcr, and then to my tv--with cable, will the picture have the same quality as if I took the tv coax cable straight to the TV? that's where the splitter comes in.

    2.If I go with DVD component>TV and DVD Dig. Coax > Receiver, I don't need any video component cables coming from receiver..

    3. John said if not using receiver for switching, only cable that needs to go between the receiver and tv is the "monitor out" for OSD. My Denon manual states "osd signals are not output from the component video output jacks {monitor out}." I'm not sure what this means.
    I can't find anything else written about connecting for OSD.


    Here's my connections, revised:

    Wall tv coax > VCR > tv coax cable > TV

    VCR video yellow > TV

    VCR audio r&W > Receiver

    DVD audio digital coax > Receiver

    DVD video component > TV

    Receiver ______ component? monitor out > TV


    thanks guys...you're doing a good deed.
    I'm an RN who works L&D, and having a baby is a lot easier than this!!
    Kathy
     
  16. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Kathy, congrats, you are 95 percent there for hookups til the speakers get wired.

    1.While there’s nothing really “wrong” with the splitter, it’s just more connections that have to be secure and there’s a small signal loss. May make no difference if the incoming cable signal is strong. But you get the same signal passed thru the VCR by connecting the cabletv coax to VCR RF In and another length of coax from VCR RF OUT to tv ANT IN.
    2.Correct.
    3.To get the OnScreenDisplay from receiver MONITOR OUT to tv, it takes only a composite (yellow band) or S-Video cable. This is a little tricky. If the composite is plugged into the same video bank of inputs where the COMPONENT ends up, the tv may not recognize composite, because it’s a lesser signal. So it would go to another video bank. You would have to switch to this second bank only when using the OSD. A Radio Shack composite video cable will be just fine here.

    The connections you have listed are correct.

    Thanks for sharing your “hands on” job experience; I’m sure it puts you in good stead to get this job done.

    bill
     
  17. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Yes, congrats! One small detail, but everything seems to all be in order. [​IMG]
     
  18. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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    Good catch, John.

    Now if Kathy is lucky, that redundant VCR video cable once unplugged will be long enough to serve as the receiver monitor out cable!

    bill
     
  19. Kathy C.

    Kathy C. Agent

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    I've ordered my cables, so when they arrive and I try to complete my mission, I'm sure I'll have more questions....stay tuned.

    thanks for all your help.

    Kathy
     
  20. Iver

    Iver Second Unit

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    Just a few quick tips, in no particular order.

    Make sure you do use the the regular composite-video output (usually yellow) and R/L audio (usually red and white) outputs to connect your VCR to your other components. Presumably you will run the audio into the receiver and the video into the TV, if you choose not to use the receiver for video switching (a pretty good suggestion, in most cases).

    When playing a tape, using the video/R/L/audio connection avoids the distortion which may be introduced in the process of turning the video and audio into an RF signal in the VCR, sending this through the coax cable to your TV, and then turning it back into analog video and audio in the TV for display.

    When the Denon manual says you can't use component video for the OSD (on-screen display), it just means you have to use either the receiver's composite or S-Video output jack, probably labeled "monitor."

    You may know this already, but the component-video connection actually consists of three cables which attach to three jacks at each end of the cable (presumably the DVD player and the back of your TV if you will not be switching the component video through the receiver). Usually the jacks at each end of the component connection are labeled "Y-Pb-Pr."

    The term "pin-jack cord" in the Denon manual means a cord which terminates in RCA plugs, meaning the kind of plug that goes into a jack like the R/L audio jacks on the back (or sometimes front) of your VCR or the yellow composite video jack on the back (or sometimes front) of your VCR. As far as I know, using the phrase "pin-jack cord" for an RCA-plug cord is nomenclature unique to Denon.

    In other words, almost all of the inputs and outputs on the back of a Denon receiver use "pin-jack" cords, as Denon calls them.

    If you want an easy way to do the hookups and want to have the option of just listening to your TV audio from broadcast TV or from a tape in your VCR over either the TV speakers or over your HT sound system, here's an option: 1) run the video and audio from the VCR into the TV; 2) run the audio output (R/L) from your TV to one of the unused audio (R/L, e.g. "VCR") inputs on the receiver.

    So, when you want to just quickly watch a TV program or play a video, you'll just have the audio over your TV speakers. When you want the audio from broadcast TV or a VHS tape to play over the HT sound system, just use the TV remote to turn off your TV speakers (in my Sony KV-27S46 this also automatically activates the line-level audio output needed to feed a receiver -- your Sony RPTV may function in an identical fashion or you may need to press an additional button or menu item to activate "fixed" or line-level audio output). Then just click TV/DBS on your Denon remote and you should be in business.
     

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