When will the 1080p tvs start to come out?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by james e m, Oct 24, 2002.

  1. james e m

    james e m Second Unit

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    I'm just curious, I've heard somethings about 1080p but I havn't heard if any tvs that can display the image. Will this be the best HDTV has to offer. I'm looking to buy an HDTV in the next year and I want to know what I should look for. Thanks!
    James
     
  2. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    There was a LCOS HDTV that was recently announced with 1080p capability. Let me see if I can find the thread.
     
  3. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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  4. Aaron Cohen

    Aaron Cohen Second Unit

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    Wait, what??????? I just bought the KV-34XBR800 television thinking it was HD.......... So there is no way that this television will ever display 1080P programming???????????????????????????????????????

    There will never be any Progressive scan players or such that will make the HD-DVD's or other sources 1080P????? I didn't know this..........
     
  5. Justin Gates

    Justin Gates Agent

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    Aaron,

    I wouldnt worry too much since there is no current 1080p programming available. HD programming that is available now is 1080i (the i being for interlaced).
     
  6. Jim FC

    Jim FC Stunt Coordinator

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    There is no easter bunny, santa claus, or 1080p format. 720p is the highest bandwidth format supported by the ATSC. It's exactly like when you see an NTSC TV advertised as having "800 scan lines," when the NTSC format supports only 500... useless numbers used to fool people into thinking they were getting a better set than the next guy's. You can wait for a TV capable of displaying 1080p, but there's no reason to do so.
     
  7. Stephen Tu

    Stephen Tu Screenwriter

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  8. Aaron Cohen

    Aaron Cohen Second Unit

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    Bah, 2 months and my set is already practically obsolete????
     
  9. Bill Slack

    Bill Slack Supporting Actor

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    Hardly obsolete.

    My set can't even resolve 1080i, since it only has 7" CRTs. Your set comes even further away than mine since it's a direct view (which has to deal with a shadow mask, or, in Sony's case, the Trinitron...)

    So what? It looks great. No one is going to be broadcasting 1080p for a very long time (if ever) and on most sets all you ever (well, all I ever notice, anyway) see is the occasional very tiny moire artifact. And if the source is interlaced originally you'll end up with the same problem even it's an interpolated and up-sampled.

    Hopefully, in 10-20 years we'll have all our movies on a shiny disc in 1080p, but don't expect it any time soon.
     
  10. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Currently (year 2002) entering a consumer grade TV video circuits, 1080 HDTV is always 1080i, never 1080p.
    Broadcast 1080p at 30 frames per second is approximately the same as broadcast 1080i at 60 fields per second. The difference is that the above 1080p has every frame (which equals two consecutive fields if converted to 1080i) representing the same subject point in motion/time while the above 1080i has each field representing an incremtally different point in motion/time. Either can be made to come out of the HDTV set top box as component video at either 1080i at approx. 60 fields per second or 1080p at approx. 60 frames per second. No consumer grade equipment creates the latter at this time, it could be done using the same line doubler technology now in use for 480i to 480p, only it needs a much faster processor. Also no consumer video equipment today displays either 1080p at 24 fps or 1080p at 30 fps.
    To get broadcast 1080p at 24 fps into either 1080i or 1080p component video (approx. 60 frames per sec.), the usual 3-2 pulldown is generated. To get 1080p at 30 fps into 1080i or 1080p component video, each frame is output twice (2-2 pulldown).
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  11. james e m

    james e m Second Unit

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    Thanks for all the great information guys. This is an interesting and informative thread to say the least.
    James
     
  12. Jim FC

    Jim FC Stunt Coordinator

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    I stand corrected. Why we'd need 1080p is beyond me, but it appears it is feasible. 720p looks outstanding but I guess there's always somebody who wants it to be better. I still don't think that we'll ever see broadcast 1080p, but you never know what the future holds.
     
  13. GregK

    GregK Screenwriter

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    I think it's a very safe bet to say widespread 1080p will happen on bigger sets, it's just when the costs and technological advances make it feasible. Limiting the peak of HDTV to 1080i or 720P would be like limiting NTSC video to 350 lines of resolution. The 480 maximum lines for NTSC have been in the specs sense the beginning, but for decades RF inputs and lower rez formats always limited the spec to around 330 to 350 lines for consumers. Something to think about.
     
  14. Eric Samonte

    Eric Samonte Screenwriter

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    Think of it this way. 1080i broadcasting is limited at best, would one think 1080p be more faster in coming to our sets? Maybe....when we reach lightspeed. Then again wouldn't holographic images be the norm that time?
     

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