When listening to CD's through a receiver, do you find the bass adequate?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Scott Stephens, Jul 19, 2002.

  1. Scott Stephens

    Scott Stephens Stunt Coordinator

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    I've finally gotten my receiver (Denon 3802) calibrated using Video Essentials, and it sounds great with home theater.

    But, when I listen to CD's (using either stereo or DPLII), I find that bass is somewhat lacking. I usually up the subwoofer level a few dB (from my calibrated level of +2dB to around +6-7 dB). While this can be cumbersome at times, I feel it definitely fills out the sound from the CD and simply sounds a little better.

    I was just wondering if I'm bass hungry, or if anyone else out there feels the same way. Any responses would be appreciated. Thanks...
     
  2. Gary Kellerman

    Gary Kellerman Stunt Coordinator

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    I have a Sherwood 6095R receiver whose sub pre-out is connected via a y cord to a 40 watt per channel Nad's power amp section. The sub pre-out has a range of plus-minus 15 steps from 0. To keep this simple, If I listen to a D.D. movie, I use a specific volume and subwoofer setting. Lets say that my vol. setting was 60 and my sub pre-out setting from the Sherwood is -3. I now want to listen to a CD through the DACS of the Sherwood in STEREO. I use my 5 fingers of my hand in the following manner:-3-2-1 0 +1. Again with my hand I continue +1+2+3+4+5. I find my sound field and imaging remains the same at the +5 setting while giving me the proper bass that appears to be needed for the CD to sound correct. I have applied this same technique to Sherwoods HALL 1 setting which gave me the same bass results.

    On this basis, yes I must increase the bass for the CD to sound "bass correct"
     
  3. Doug_B

    Doug_B Screenwriter

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    There are a number of reasons why this can be. One of them that sticks out in my mind that may not get as much air time is the fact that you've likely calibrated your sub using DD source material, such as Avia or Video Essentials. I personally used Avia. The signal used for calibrating your sub against your other speakers may not be representative of the signals that get sent to your sub for music. If this is so, the room modes may be different for each of these, and all bets are off as to what the results would be for music (dependent on each CD, but there may be common low freq characteristics across may selections of a particular genre).
    Again, not the only possibility. If you have a test tone CD, you can see if certain freqs do show distinct differences relative to others or to the DD calibration itself. Chances are they will unless you've already flattened out your room bass-wise, which doesn't appear to be the case. If you don't have a test CD, Vince Maskeeper has recently posted DD test tones at 40 Hz here that you can use (for example, after burning it to a CD-R/CD-RW).
    Doug
     
  4. Mike Bledsoe

    Mike Bledsoe Stunt Coordinator

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    Well the only thing that I can think of is that the bass for movies is usually stronger than the bass for music so you have probably adjusted the movie bass accordingly to keep it from getting out of hand which when you go to music leaves it a little lacking. You did the right thing in adjusting it accordingly. The Denon will remember the settings
     

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