When "Foolscreen" dvds are necessary...

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Jason*C, Oct 27, 2003.

  1. Jason*C

    Jason*C Extra

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hey guys I just joined the forum and I had a question.

    I've read articles from DigitalBits and such about the importance of buying animorphic dvds so your investment is at least somewhat protected for the future when most tvs are widescreen and the new formats come out.

    I've noticed that on some series dvds such as Star Trek and the Battlestar Galactica set, that they are in fullscreen 4:3 since they didnt have the widescreen cameras back then?

    Anyway would it be a waste of money to buy these dvd sets now? Will they figure out a way to stretch the picture to widescreen without a loss of picture quality?

    Or are these collections fairly safe for future investment?
     
  2. MartinTeller

    MartinTeller Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2002
    Messages:
    1,721
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Are you talking about the television series? Almost all TV shows are 4:3. Only a few from the past 5 years or so are widescreen.
     
  3. Chad R

    Chad R Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 1999
    Messages:
    2,178
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Real Name:
    Chad Rouch


    It's not that they didn't have 'widescreen cameras' it's that they were shot with the express intent of being on TV, and therefore widescreen wasn't a consideration. There were no widescreen TVs up until a few years ago.

    Widescreen was up until recently the sole province of films, especially since the widescreen process (achieved through lenses, not special cameras) was ushered in specifically to combat television which was stealing away movie theater's audiences.
     
  4. Andy_G

    Andy_G Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2000
    Messages:
    212
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This sounds like a flame bait.
     
  5. Jason*C

    Jason*C Extra

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So all i'm asking is that its a pretty safe investment putting down $100 for a season of TNG for example since the only thing they can really do is put up a higher transfer rate on a disc later on?

    I don't mean this to be flame bait, I just wanted to know.
     
  6. Todd Schnell

    Todd Schnell Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 21, 2001
    Messages:
    255
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Jason, basically the correct way to publish any movie, TV show, etc, would be as the director intended in the OAR (original aspect ratio). It doesn't matter matter if that ratio is 2.35:1 etc. widescreen or 1.33:1 (4:3) often called fullscreen. Star Trek for instance was shot at the norm for TV 1.33:1, & there is no need to crop the image just to make it "widescreen". Does that help?

    Todd
     
  7. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  8. Jonathan Perregaux

    Jonathan Perregaux Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 1999
    Messages:
    1,477
    Likes Received:
    858
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    Jonathan Perregaux
    I stretch all my movies to fit my triangular-shaped television.
     
  9. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 1997
    Messages:
    10,528
    Likes Received:
    719
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Jason - I don't think this is a flame bait thread so I'm going to actually [try] to answer your question.

    First of all, you must understand aspect ratios. Go to www.widescreen.org and click on "Aspect Ratios" and "Widescreen TV Q&A" and "What is Widescreen" on the left hand menu. Actually, just click around the whole site, it's quite an education.

    What is important to understand is that we here at HTF (and the Bits) are not just "widescreen" enthusiasts, but OAR - Original Aspect Ratio - enthusiasts. We want things to be put on DVD as they were shown originally - thus some movies will be very wide (2.35:1 aspect ratio) some moderately wide (1.85:1 or 1.66:1_ and some in Academy (or TV) ratio (1.33:1 or what the common TV looks like).

    The TV shows you are contemplating on buying *should* be in 1.33:1 (or TV) aspect ratio because that is how they were shown. Granted when you get a widescreen TV you will have bars on the sides, but that is to be expected. It is not a waste of your money, as that was how the picture was intended to be seen (just like widescreen movies are not a waste on a 1.33:1 TV nowadays).

    There's an HTF Primer on aspect ratios I think, but I don't have the link to that.

    Perhaps others can chime in on resources Jason can read up on to better understand the situation?
     
  10. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 1999
    Messages:
    3,756
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Jonathan Perregaux,

    That's not a triangular tv, that's an interrocitor--check out an old sci-fi movie called This Island Earth, or Mystery Science Theater, The Movie.

    There are very few of these left in good working order, as they predate even the Philco Predicta. Some surmise that the interrocitor's design with the tube on top of the chassis box was actually the inspiration for the Predicta.
     
  11. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2003
    Messages:
    12,013
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  12. Rob Tomlin

    Rob Tomlin Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2000
    Messages:
    4,505
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  13. Clay-F

    Clay-F Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2003
    Messages:
    230
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    To me the evil isnt in fullscreen.

    The evil that we all are fighting is cropping (is it two 'p's?)

    I dont want anything cut out of my entertainment. So I dont want widescreen movies "cut" to fullscreen just like I dont want full screen tv shows "cut" to widescreen.

    It's just not natural!
     
  14. George_W_K

    George_W_K Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2003
    Messages:
    1,714
    Likes Received:
    88
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Location:
    Ohio
    Real Name:
    George
    OAR OAR OAR OAR OAR OAR OAR OAR!!!!!!'

    I belive that it would be a safe purchase for you.

    If you're looking for a good sci-fi show that's 16 X 9, check out the Babylon 5 boxed sets. They weren't cropped, they were originally filmed with the future format in mind. (Or so says the show's creator.) Very good show.

    Enjoy the sets in their original format. If they do change them anytime in the future it'll only be because of all the Joe Sixpack's who don't like how their 16 X 9 plasmas have black bars on the sides!
     
  15. Nick T Robot

    Nick T Robot Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    563
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Some shows are shown on TV both ways

    Sopranos was shown on HBO and HBO2 at the same time, people could flip to HBO2 to see the 4:3 version of the show, filmed in 16:9 and shown that way on HBO.

    I can't remember if 24 is shown 4:3 but it's filmed 16:9 anamorphic widescreen and looks fantastic on DVD, plus it's an excellent show. I HIGHLY recommend it. (Third Season starts tonight at 21:00 EST!!!)[​IMG]
     
  16. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2003
    Messages:
    12,013
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  17. Tony Whalen

    Tony Whalen Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2002
    Messages:
    3,150
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  18. Steve Tannehill

    Steve Tannehill Ambassador

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 1997
    Messages:
    5,547
    Likes Received:
    215
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    DFW
    Real Name:
    Steve Tannehill
     
  19. Rob Tomlin

    Rob Tomlin Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2000
    Messages:
    4,505
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  20. SteveK

    SteveK Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2000
    Messages:
    518
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Perhaps slightly OT, but it would be nice if HBO would do with feature films what they do with The Sopranos...show it fullscreen on HBO2 and show it OAR on HBO. I would love to subscribe to HBO, partly for the various series they have, but I won't subscribe to HBO (or any other premium channel) because they show almost all movies in P&S. Why should I pay to watch a butchered movie?

    I don't know why HBO (or some other premium network) can't dedicate at least one channel to OAR presentations. Surely HBO is aware of the growing popularity of widscreen, yet they continue to show most movies P&S. Yet their original series are usually filmed (and shown) in widescreen. It simply doesn't make sense!

    Steve K.
     

Share This Page