What's this about HDTV being obsolete??

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brian Steeves, Jun 24, 2001.

  1. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

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    Here's the story guys...
    My cable went out tonight and after waiting on hold for about 10 mins I finally got to talk to someone. While I was talking to him I happened to ask when Tome Warner would have the HDTV signal through their boxes. The guy told me it's his understanding that beginning early next year NBC will be ceasing it's broadcast in the Tampa area. He said the reason for that is the "technology" is already obsolete and that everything will be going "pure digital" and that the digital sets will be even better than HDTV. Now I have no idea if he really knew what he was talking about or not, but if this true there are gonna be some really pissed of people. I was getting really close to taking the plunge and buy an HDTV set but now I don't know? Could this be the reason for the big drops in prices lately? If it is true then it seems more and more like the PC market, when you buy a PC it's already obsolete!
     
  2. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Brian,
    I would not worry too much about anything told to me by a cable company service rep drone over the phone.
    Yeah, there's some paranoia going on about hdtv standards and copy protection. Opinions vary on the advisability of buying an hd-ready set due to these factors.
    In my area, hd of any kind ain't gonna happen any time soon except for a couple or 3 channels on satellite.
    The thing is that there's no way to get a 16/9 set that can do progressive scan without buying an hd-ready set. With the price of progressive scan players dropping to the $250 point even at local b/m stores, the purchase of such a set would be worth it to me even if hdtv disappears alltogether or never happens in good old Fresno.
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    Steve S.
    I prefer not to push the subwoofers until they're properly run in.
     
  3. RobertR

    RobertR Lead Actor

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    This kind of thing annoys me, because it has the ring of half-truths that distort what's really going on. It's true that there's talk of a digital connection standard. The studios like it because they like the idea of having hidef content digitally encrypted. It's also true that there's talk about requiring use of an ecryption box that would use the digital connection standard to see hidef content that would make current hidef sets useless without the box. Most people are VEHEMENTLY against this idea.
    What ISN'T true is that this constitutes some sort of "improved" "pure digital" picture that's "better" than HDTV. That's pure BS. It IS HDTV, only CONNECTED differently.
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  4. Steven_C

    Steven_C Extra

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    Hello Steve from Fresno. This is another Steve from Fresno. Are you receiving the HD Direct TV channels right now? I have an HD ready set right now. Also a non-progressive DVD player and an older Sony DSS system. I'm not sure if I should buy a new DVD player or an HDTV decoder next. It's good to see a fellow Fresnan on the forum. Cheers!
     
  5. Brian_J

    Brian_J Second Unit

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    You might be interested in the Mitsubishi "Guarantee." Basically, because of these concerns, they guarantee to keep every HD-ready tv digital capable regardless of new format standards for a "fair price."
    Brian
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    Zed's Dead Baby...
     
  6. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Steve,
    I did my last tv upgrade in Oct. of 99, couldn't afford the hd-ready sets available at that time and the hd directv tuners weren't even out yet. I'm using a 53" Hitachi Ultravision ntsc-only tv and Panasonic A-320 interlaced player.
    I won't be upgrading my tv for another few years. I read in the paper that our local channels are supposed to start digital broadcasting in late spring of 2002, so an hd receiver might be a good investment for your hd-ready set. Of course the local stations may delay this, and you'd be watching the same old network shows, just with a better picture.
    If I were buying an hd-ready set today, I'd get the progressive scan dvd player before I'd get the hd receiver. I'd sorta want to wait on the reciever until there's more hd programming available. Of course, I haven't seen much true High-Def. Maybe if I'd seen a movie or 2 in high def on HBO my priorities would change!!
    For now the plastic is a bit too warm to consider any upgrades, lol.
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    Steve S.
    I prefer not to push the subwoofers until they're properly run in.
     
  7. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

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    The thing the cable guy is talking about is this digital encryption crap the movie studios are pushing for.
    Currently, all HDTV's have analog inputs (component, VGA, whatever).
    Well, the movie studios want an all-digital signal path to the HD set, so they can encrypt it digitally, to employ digital copy protection, to prevent people from re-digitizing the analog signals, and pirating them over the internet. However, this copy protection can also limit the recording, viewing, and receiving of all digital signals. This means they can have full control over what you can watch. Which means they can charge you on a per-play basis. This is the real motivation behind this "copy protection".
    Now, in order to see ANY HDTV, you'll not only need a new HD receiver with the capability to receive and pass a digital signal via DVI/Firewire, but you'll also need a new TV, capable of accepting an encrypted digital signal via DVI/Firewire. The TV will also need to have the appropriate decryption hardware built-in. Guess what? The 1+ million HD sets that are currently in homes don't have this. Which means if this crap goes through, everyone that owns a HDTV, will have a very expensive regular NTSC tv. They wont be able to display a HD signal.
    So far, Mitsubishi is the only company that is "promising" an "upgrade" path for current HDTV owners. This will probably be in the form of some retro-fit hardware that is installed by a tech in the field, for a nice hefty price of around $1,000. Bullshit!
    As far as everyone who didn't buy a Mitsubishi (including me) - Well, we're screwed I guess.
    We didn't pay $$$$ for a HDTV to have to pay more $$$ to "really make it a HDTV" because there's some greedy bastards at the movie studios.
    This whole thing sucks, and is going to delay HD from being fully accepted for a much longer time.
    If this goes through, not only will our sets be obsolete, but worse - we'll be "forced" to comply with this "pay-per-play" crap, which looks so much like the ill-fated DIVX.
    We don't want our fair-use rights to be taken away with this transition to HD. If that's what's going to happen, then screw HDTV! I want to be able to record shows, and watch them later! Well, it simply won't be allowed with this new digital crap, because they're scared that some pirates are going to make them go out of business.....PLEASE!! Pirates are going to figure out a way to crack the scheme regardless - It's just the way it works. The movie studios are just using this excuse to gain the control they wanted with DVD to begin with.
    Arrrgghgh! [​IMG]
    -Ryan Dinan
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    [​IMG]
     
  8. Tom Damico

    Tom Damico Auditioning

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    Its interesting that many,many years ago, I figured the VCR was the best thing in the world, not only because it allowed me to watch movies, but it was going to allow me to record them too! Now I have a VHS video collection of about 300-400 movies and not one I recorded off the TV. I ended up only using my VCR as a movie watching device. Now, I bought an HD ready TV, the Mitsubishi WS-65907 and I never plan on actually ever buying the HDTV receiver, regardless of what content they put in this format. I watch pratically no broadcast TV. (which is weird as I have a DSS system and have had for years) But anyhow, the sole reason for my purchase was for my HT. I wanted 480P for my HT movies. So I purchased a DVDO Pro doubler and my DVD goes through it, my DSS goes through it and I use my TV for 99% DVD movie watching instead of going to the movies and putting up with the crowds and kids. Now I have a DVD collection of 300-400 movies. Anybody want to buy some VHS tapes?! (just a joke)
    Anyhow, I wonder how many other people are like me. Who cares when and if ever they broadcast regular TV in HDTV format, everything there is mostly garbage anyway. So who cares that we can watch the garbage in High Definition? But oh man, do my movies on DVD ever look sweet at higher resolution!!!
    TomD
     
  9. Timmy

    Timmy Stunt Coordinator

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  10. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Currently the only convenient way to record U.S. video is 480i. Therefore even if HDTV broadcasts continued to be in a form that today's set top boxes could receive and send 1080i component video to the TV, those of us wishing to time-shift programming will continue to use our VCRs or TIVO(tm)'s fed by the S-video or composite jack of the set top box.
    But I agree that HDTV should continue to be receivable as HDTV on today's HDTV sets using today's HDTV set top boxes. The next problem is that it could be watered down, even though it may 1080i in number of scan lines and frames per second, it could fall far short of HDTV in subject matter detail.
    More on the subject of new incompatible TV standards rendering existing sets obsolete (ancient history)http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/rca2.htm
     

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