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What's the deal with....shimmer?

Discussion in 'DVD' started by [email protected], Jun 30, 2003.

  1. Frank@N

    [email protected] Screenwriter

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    I was wondering what sort of transfer issues cause this horrible artifact.

    I've seen shimmer in anamorphic transfers (Scream 3) and more commonly in 4:3 transfers (but puzzlingly not in all).

    So what causes shimmer? Does a progressive scan TV reduce it's visibility?
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Reduce the chroma level in your display. This is the cause of most "shimmer." You have too much color saturation.
     
  3. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    The term "shimmer" could be accurately applied to all sorts of image problems, with multiple causes.

    As my esteemed colleague indicates, many appearances of "shimmer" can be tamed by proper calibration of the display device. Others result from the 3-2 pulldown converion used to convert 24fps film to 30fps video; with those, a progressive scan player (or an HD-ready TV with good line-doubling circuitry) may improve the problem.

    Certain instances of "shimmer" are simply an unavoidable effect of translating a high-resolution medium like film into a low-res one like NTSC video. There's not much you can do about those.

    And sometimes "shimmer" is in the source. This is becoming more common with the increasing use of digital video. You can see many instances of it, for example, in the current 28 Days Later.

    M.
     

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