What's the best way to set up a new hard drive?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by brentl, Jan 2, 2003.

  1. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 7, 1999
    Messages:
    2,921
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Just got a new, regular edition, WD 60gig for $100 and I need to know the best way to set it up.
    Should I have one BIG partition? How many partitions should I have.
    Would it makes sense to move my 15 gig 5400RPM drive to secondary master since it's currently my main drive?
    Does Windows XP still set the block size(?) differently after that 8.4 GIG limit like a few years ago.
    Will I notice the difference between a 5400 and 7200 RPM drive
    Thanks
    Brent
    I guess I really didn't need a drive, but for $100 what the hey[​IMG]
    That would be $100 CANADIAN[​IMG]
     
  2. Glenn L

    Glenn L Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 1999
    Messages:
    56
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0


    FAT/VFAT doesn't support huge partitions (I think the limit is 32GB). If you make one big partition on that disk, you'll have to use NTFS. It'll use its own settings for block size.

    If it were me, I'd just reinstall windows on the new disk, then use the old disk for swap & scratch space... if I used it at all.
     
  3. Chris T. Kennedy

    Chris T. Kennedy Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 1999
    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You will most definitely see a speed increase going from 5400 RPM to 7200 RPM. Move the old drive to slave. I recommend using it for data files. (MP3s, documents, avis, mpegs, all sorts of multimedia, etc)
    I/O is the slowest thing that gets in performance's way. So long as we are using mechanical hard drives, that's the way it is gonna be. [​IMG]
    I don't want to seem like I am jumping on Glenn, but no matter what make sure the swap file goes on that faster drive. It'll be the most accessed file on there and the faster speed will help. Even if you are chugging along at ATA-33, that RPM will make the difference.
    Western Digital has a program that will basically copy all the data from your old drive to your new one....however lately I haven't really liked it much. Give it a try and see if it works. If it doesn't - you can always do a clean install. With the pain of setting up the OS (as easy as it is), it is pretty time-consuming.
    Of course, the amount of time it will take to copy that drive over will depend on your system speed and IDE capabilities (etc). Good luck with it all.
    As for one partition - that is fine...I actually have my primary master drive split into 3 GB for the "system" C: drive and the rest into D:. This helps for doing new installs (if you upgrade major hardware - motherboards - often). It also keeps the swap file inside a small physical location space on the disk. Up to you.
    And naturally, keep it defragged. [​IMG]
    - Chris
     
  4. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 1998
    Messages:
    3,632
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Unless you have a specific need to do otherwise, I'd go for two partitions. One for the OS and applications, the other for your own data. If you ever need to reinstall your OS, you wont need to backup your data first.
     
  5. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 1999
    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'd do two partitions, precisely for the reason Rob states. This has saved me a bit of hassle on the unofficially-required "Windows likes a clean reinstall once a year."[​IMG]
    In fact, I just replaced my 45GB 5400rpm Western Digital (running at ATA/66), with a 60GB 7200rpm that I had lying around (locked at ATA/33 for some reason). PCPitStop.com tells me the uncached drive performance improved from 3.9MB/sec transfer rate, to 6.7MB/sec (PIII-667 system). I was surprised, given the ATA/33 restriction. The "seat of the pants" feel is in line with that stated improvement.
    Todd
     
  6. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 7, 1999
    Messages:
    2,921
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Ok, so it looks like a clean install with Xp on a 40 gig partition, 20 gig for other crap, and my old drive JUST FOR FUN[​IMG]
    Would it make sense to use the 15 GIG drive for game images(discs I own ONLY!). That way I can reload a lot quicker than loading the discs??
    I'd think I could get between 12-15 current games on the 15 gig drive.
    It would also give me the ability to store the CDs elsewhere without worrying about damaging them?
    Playing iron storm now, I gues I'll try to save the "game saves" and see if I can put them back when I reload.
    Thanks guys
    Brent.
    I guess I'll test both drives when I'm done reloading!
     
  7. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 1999
    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'd reverse that- 20GB for XP, the rest for "whatever." "Whatever" for me is my entire CD collection in 256Kbps MP3, about 500 MPEG Home Movies, and nearly 2000 digital photos. That nearly fills the 40GB.

    Just a thought.
     
  8. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 1998
    Messages:
    3,632
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What on earth are you going to fill 40 - or even 20 gb with?
    My OS partition has Windows 2000 plus apps such as Office XP, Paint Shop, Photo Shop, Soundforge plus loads of others and doesn't even hit 3gb.
    Now, my own data partitions - that's another story [​IMG]
     
  9. Lyden

    Lyden Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2002
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    i wouldnt use the 15gig for games you said its 5400RPM right well thats a bit slow for games i have dual 20gigs one 7200RPM with OS and games and other pograms and i have a 5400RPM wich is for all my save files and MP3's videos and whatnot even pictures are on it but really games should be left on the faster HDD
     
  10. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 7, 1999
    Messages:
    2,921
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Actually Lydon I was looking at storing "images" of my games so When I reformat my main drive I can load my games from a hard drive.

    Should be lots quicker.

    Brent
     
  11. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 1999
    Messages:
    11,267
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  12. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 1998
    Messages:
    3,632
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yeah but Jeff that would be a 'data' file rather than an OS file.

    If the first partition is just for the OS and apps, it doesn't need to be anywhere near 20gb.
     

Share This Page