What's the best method for backing up 5-10 GB files?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Rob Gardiner, Feb 13, 2003.

  1. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2002
    Messages:
    2,950
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi everybody,

    One of my job functions is video capture. Our office receives police or surveillance videos, usually 30 min but sometimes as long as 60 min. I capture them to a PC using the Canopus ADVC-100 video converter (breakout box that connects to PC via firewire). The results are excellent but the files are huge -- about 10 MB for a hour video. We then compress the videos to MPEG and burn them onto VCDs but we would like to archive the uncompressed DV files for posterity. These are too big even for a DVD recorder. What is the best way to archive these files? Are there huge tape drives that can accommodate files of this size? Any help would be appreciated. Many thanks!
     
  2. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 1998
    Messages:
    3,632
    Likes Received:
    5
    You could use Ghost 2003 and burn them to DVD-R. The image file will just span as many disks as it needs.
     
  3. Tekara

    Tekara Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2003
    Messages:
    783
    Likes Received:
    0
    winrar is what I would recommend, you can make a single file or group of files into a group of zips of a specified size and you can even make a error checking file that the program will use to check for corruption. it's used all the time on IRC for large file exchanges.
     
  4. Jesse Leonard

    Jesse Leonard Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2000
    Messages:
    430
    Likes Received:
    0
    For large file backups the best way to go is tape backup. What is your budget for this project and how often are you going to be backing up these files?
     
  5. DonRoeber

    DonRoeber Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2001
    Messages:
    1,849
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yeah, look into a tape drive. At minimum, you probably need a DDS4 DAT drive. But it's probably better to go with a DLT drive. Not cheap, but they're rock solid.
     
  6. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2002
    Messages:
    2,950
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks everybody for the quick responses. I looked at those tape drives and they would be very convenient but out of the budget, I'm afraid.

    The boss is thinking of getting a DVD-R. I'm not at the point where I can compress, master, and author DVDs yet but having the drive would make backups relatively convenient and affordable. Of the options mentioned so far, this seems like the best one.

    Also I've heard that a DV camera can be used as well. We have a digital 8 camera in the office that has a firewire port and supposedly can record in some sort of pseudo-DV format (with lower capacity, of course). Would this be a viable option? I should look up the camera's specs and try to experiment a bit, but any comments from others would be welcome.
     
  7. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2000
    Messages:
    1,232
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would say if you have a price issue that wouldnt allow you to go with a tape backup that DVD would not be a bad alternative. The only problem is that you would need 2-3 discs instead of a single 10-20GB Tape. Restores could also take you a lot longer off of the DVD if they are needed.

    Plus you get the bonus of being able to buy your own DVD discs and backing up your DVD's [​IMG]

    KyleS
     
  8. Mathew Shelby

    Mathew Shelby Second Unit

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2002
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know it is off the subject, but what is your profession. I am in college and that sounds like a cool job looking at police surveillance.
     
  9. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2002
    Messages:
    2,950
    Likes Received:
    1
    I work in a private investigator's office. Some local police departments have started putting cameras in their cars to record violator stops for DUI, etc. Our office examines the tapes to be sure the officers don't blatantly violate the driver's rights, or improperty administer the field sobriety tests. Unfortunately, they often do. [​IMG]
     
  10. Ammon

    Ammon Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2002
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    0
    How often will you be backing up? Are the backups going to be backed-up and then never used again? Or will you be overwriting the backups ever? If it is just going to be backed up once and stored without being used again for backup, then I would go with the tape. If you are going to be using the backup device over and over, you may want to look at using a removable hard drive. Tapes degrade the more you use them.
     
  11. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2000
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    0
    The tapes will degrade, but it takes quite a while for it to happen.

    We have to do a full system back up on a 12gb DAT tape every day. We have 3 tapes that we alternate per week, so each tape gets used probably 8-10 times per month (rewritten). We may have to replace a tape a year. Probably much less than that on average.
     
  12. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2002
    Messages:
    2,950
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ammon,

    Each 30 min video represents one project. At the completion of a project (several weeks) the video will be archived and most likely never used again.

    It does not make sense for us to backup these files onto large (40GB) media because each 5 or 10 GB file will be stored separately. Also it looks like the tape drive is out of our price range, so the DVD-R looks like the best option.

    Many thanks for the replies.
     
  13. Thomas Newton

    Thomas Newton Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 1999
    Messages:
    1,519
    Likes Received:
    29
    If the video is in DV format and you can bring it into a computer by FireWire, there is another option. You could convert it to DVD-Video format, and burn that on a DVD-R. (This is exactly what iMovie and iDVD allow you to do with video from FireWire-connected camcorders.)

    Drawbacks: You can't edit MPEG-2 as easily as you can edit DV. Encoding and burning each disc may take a while. The resolution of the DVD might be somewhat lower than that of the DV source video.

    Advantages: You can get 60 minutes of MPEG-2 video on one 4.7 GB DVD-R disc. You'll be able to play that DVD-Video disc on many DVD players, as well as on computers.
     

Share This Page