What's on your Daily Viewing List?

bujaki

Cinematographer
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Jose Ortiz-Marrero
Quatermass 2 (Shout BD) 1957. Widescreen and uncut! Excellent followup to The Quatermass Xperiment. It was good to see Hitchcock's leading man from Blackmail (1929) play Inspector Lomax here. Onward to the conclusion of the trilogy.
Internes Can't Take Money (Kino BD) 1937. As it was spelled at the time, internes with an "e." Starring Joel McCrea as the good Dr. Kildare in his first screen appearance, opposite Stanwyck looking radiant as lit by the great Theodor Sparkuhl (check out his credits!). I last saw this in a 16mm print screened by Bill Everson. This transfer looks great. Plus it's a picture combining doctor/hospital/romance/underworld melodrama in a very satisfying fashion. Good to have.
Return from the Ashes (Kino BD) 1965. The source novel was used to remake this film in 2014 as Phoenix in Germany (a Criterion release). The latter film takes the initial premise of a woman returning from Dachau to a faithless husband who doesn't recognize her, and takes it into a darker road and climax. It's also a better film. However, this one is constructed more like a crime thriller and, as such, it works, particularly with actors of the caliber of Maximilian Schell, Ingrid Thulin and Samantha Eggar. In its own way, it's also quite satisfying as it lives out Ivan Karamazov's philosophy of amorality.
 
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BobO'Link

Lead Actor
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Howie
More for today:
1593815519110.png

It Came from Beneath the Sea was watched in the original BW, although I did sample the colorized version which looks better than I recall from a viewing of the DVD colorized version. I don't know if that's because it's on BR or not.

The 3 Worlds of Gulliver - I don't particularly care for the story at all. Still, this is my favorite filmed version of the story.

I'll be watching Earth vs. Flying Saucers later tonight or sometime tomorrow - in BW of course. It's a favorite.

This set was purchased for the BR versions of It Came from Beneath the Sea and Earth vs. The Flying Saucers. The "bonus" is the colorized version of both are included along with the BW version. I think they also include all of the special features of the Columbia DVD versions but haven't checked. While I rarely watch them colorized it's nice to have it just because. And in spite of it saying it's region "B" it's really all region. The transfers are quite good too so that's a plus.
 

Robin9

Producer
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Dec 13, 2006
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5,472
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Robin
I watched Rachel And The Stranger today. I hadn't seen the film for decades and had forgotten most of it. I enjoyed it far more than I did previously but I have to admit that if the film did not have William Holden, Robert Mitchum and Loretta Young I might have lost interest quickly. If the stars had been people I don't much like, for example George Murphy, Gene Barry and Barbara Bel Geddes, I wouldn't have lasted five minutes! As it is, I'm glad to have this film in my collection.
 

DFurr

Supporting Actor
Premium
Joined
Sep 6, 2010
Messages
768
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SoCal
Real Name
Don
Tonight was "The Boy", 2016.
Netflix streaming 2:35:1
We are really impressed with the quality of the Netflix streaming.

boy.jpg
 

Adam Lenhardt

Director
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Feb 16, 2001
Messages
23,179
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Albany, NY
Adam Lenhardt's 2020 Mid-Year Summary

January:
  • 01/18/20: The Darjeeling Limited (2007)
    Blu-Ray Disc
    watched at 1080P resolution
February:
  • 02/01/20: Ready or Not (2019)
    Vudu
    watched at 4K resolution
  • 02/27/20: Doctor Sleep (2019) [Director's Cut]
    Vudu
    and The Shining (1980)
    4K Ultra HD Disc
    , both watched at 4K resolution
April:
May:
June:
 

Adam Lenhardt

Director
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Joined
Feb 16, 2001
Messages
23,179
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Albany, NY
Hamilton
Originally Released: 07/03/2020
Watched: 07/03/2020
4K digital streaming on Disney+

Hamilton_2020_DisneyPlus_Poster.jpg


This is billed as the Original Broadway Production, and that's both true and not true. It stars the original Broadway cast, and was filmed in during the final weeks of their run in the same Broadway theater. A significant percentage of the runtime was filmed during two performances of the original Broadway production.

But a significant percentage of the runtime was also filmed between performances, using camera positions and movements that would not be possible with a live audience. The closest thing to it that I can think of is Vanya on 42nd Street, where Louis Malle stages an intimate performance of David Mamet's adaptation of Uncle Vanya inside the abandoned and crumbling New Amsterdam Theater without an audience, with a cast who had been workshopping Chekov's body of work for years.

In both cases, the camera is afforded a level of intimacy not available to live audiences, not even to the people sitting in the first row of the Orchestra seating. It also has a tremendous impact on performance, screen acting is different than stage acting, because what plays to the back row of the balcony is different than what plays to a camera only a few feet from the actors' faces.

Kail's tremendous achievement here is a hybrid approach that essentially rotates between three perspectives:
  1. The live audience's perspective, with everything within the proscenium arch visible in the frame.
  2. The front row audience's perspective, with the cast looming straight ahead.
  3. The actors' perspective, as the camera swoops over them and weaves between them.
The first two perspectives were presumably largely taken from the two live performances while the third was shot in between the live performances specifically for this presentation. The first two perspectives then necessarily feature stage acting, while the third perspective permits screen acting and a level of nuance and subtlety that isn't normally possible on the stage.

The third perspective, then, could have clashed horribly with the first two perspectives. But it all cuts together beautifully and seamlessly. I admired the craft at first, but quickly just got sucked into the experience.

Roger Ebert wrote of Vanya on 42nd Street: "There is not a shot that calls attention to itself, and yet not a shot that is without thought." The same is largely true of this presentation. The framing, the editing, the camera movements all serve to keep the audience focused on what Miranda and Kail wanted the live audiences focused on at each given moment. The set design is quite minimalist, but the way scenes are shot at times significantly aids in the illusion. But nothing about the filming style is particularly showy.

With the exception of the censorship of a couple f-bombs, the libretto is intact -- with far more adult language and adult themes than any other movie I can recall opening with the Disney castle. On one hand, it would have made more sense from a branding standpoint to release this under one of Disney's other brands: Touchstone Pictures, 20th Century Studios, or even Searchlight would have been a more natural fit. On the other hand, I understand why Disney wants what is arguably this century's biggest cultural phenomenon to go out under its flagship brand.

Just an incredible, incredible achievement. Pretty much certain to be a fixture in my Fourth of July celebrations for years to come.

I hope this gets an UHD disc release at some point in the future, because the presentation is tremendous.
 

JohnRice

Film Editor
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Joined
Jun 20, 2000
Messages
13,102
Location
A Mile High
Real Name
John
Hamilton
Originally Released: 07/03/2020
Watched: 07/03/2020
4K digital streaming on Disney+

View attachment 75048

This is billed as the Original Broadway Production, and that's both true and not true. It stars the original Broadway cast, and was filmed in during the final weeks of their run in the same Broadway theater. A significant percentage of the runtime was filmed during two performances of the original Broadway production.

But a significant percentage of the runtime was also filmed between performances, using camera positions and movements that would not be possible with a live audience. The closest thing to it that I can think of is Vanya on 42nd Street, where Louis Malle stages an intimate performance of David Mamet's adaptation of Uncle Vanya inside the abandoned and crumbling New Amsterdam Theater without an audience, with a cast who had been workshopping Chekov's body of work for years.

In both cases, the camera is afforded a level of intimacy not available to live audiences, not even to the people sitting in the first row of the Orchestra seating. It also has a tremendous impact on performance, screen acting is different than stage acting, because what plays to the back row of the balcony is different than what plays to a camera only a few feet from the actors' faces.

Kail's tremendous achievement here is a hybrid approach that essentially rotates between three perspectives:
  1. The live audience's perspective, with everything within the proscenium arch visible in the frame.
  2. The front row audience's perspective, with the cast looming straight ahead.
  3. The actors' perspective, as the camera swoops over them and weaves between them.
The first two perspectives were presumably largely taken from the two live performances while the third was shot in between the live performances specifically for this presentation. The first two perspectives then necessarily feature stage acting, while the third perspective permits screen acting and a level of nuance and subtlety that isn't normally possible on the stage.

The third perspective, then, could have clashed horribly with the first two perspectives. But it all cuts together beautifully and seamlessly. I admired the craft at first, but quickly just got sucked into the experience.

Roger Ebert wrote of Vanya on 42nd Street: "There is not a shot that calls attention to itself, and yet not a shot that is without thought." The same is largely true of this presentation. The framing, the editing, the camera movements all serve to keep the audience focused on what Miranda and Kail wanted the live audiences focused on at each given moment. The set design is quite minimalist, but the way scenes are shot at times significantly aids in the illusion. But nothing about the filming style is particularly showy.

With the exception of the censorship of a couple f-bombs, the libretto is intact -- with far more adult language and adult themes than any other movie I can recall opening with the Disney castle. On one hand, it would have made more sense from a branding standpoint to release this under one of Disney's other brands: Touchstone Pictures, 20th Century Studios, or even Searchlight would have been a more natural fit. On the other hand, I understand why Disney wants what is arguably this century's biggest cultural phenomenon to go out under its flagship brand.

Just an incredible, incredible achievement. Pretty much certain to be a fixture in my Fourth of July celebrations for years to come.

I hope this gets an UHD disc release at some point in the future, because the presentation is tremendous.
Excellent work as always Adam. I might have to sign up for Disney+ just to see this.
 

bujaki

Cinematographer
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2012
Messages
4,616
Location
Richardson, TX
Real Name
Jose Ortiz-Marrero
Quatermass and the Pit (Shout BD) 1967. The best of the Quatermass trilogy and a fitting conclusion. The theme is the destruction of the "other," whatever is different from you. And it is scary. Excellent disc.
The Spoilers (Kino BD) 1942. Dietrich, Scott, Wayne. In that order. Rousing adventure story that I'd never seen in such spectacular glory. Add favorite Margaret Lindsay and silent classic stars like Harry Carey, Richard Barthelmess and William Farnum (who played the Wayne role in the 1914 version), plus one of the greatest fist fights in film history, and you come up with a real winner.
Murder, He Says (Kino BD) 1945. Last seen in a nitrate 35mm print at MoMA in 1976 where it failed to impress me. Damn if it didn't have the same effect once again. Perhaps if it had been a silent '20s Harold Lloyd film I'd have enjoyed it. I felt it somewhat dissonant for a 1945 film. As Crawdaddy says, comedy is subjective.
 
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BobO'Link

Lead Actor
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Howie
1593889809376.png


Another good installment that continues from the previous story arc. Oddly, they don't return to the Ark to tell its inhabitants of their findings.
 

JohnRice

Film Editor
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2000
Messages
13,102
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A Mile High
Real Name
John
What better way to celebrate Independence Day than with a visit to The United States of Zombieland?

In glorious 4K Atmos.

Time to nut up or shut up.

 

Matt Hough

Director
Reviewer
Joined
Apr 24, 2006
Messages
22,020
Location
Charlotte, NC
Real Name
Matt Hough
I watched The Alphabet Murders off the TCM app this afternoon. I usually go four or five years between visits to this horrendous adaptation of Christie's The A.B.C. Murders and always forget in between viewings what makes it so terrible. But it all comes back to me as I watch: dreadful miscasting of Tony Randall as Poirot with a Belgian accent that makes Dick Van Dyke's Cockney sound legitimate, absolute hash made of the masterpiece plot designed by Mrs. Christie for the book, and a basically cheap production with a too self-conscious attempt to make it a comic mystery. Dame Agatha must have been sickened by this lame attempt to bring her brilliant whodunit to the screen.
 

bujaki

Cinematographer
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Joined
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Messages
4,616
Location
Richardson, TX
Real Name
Jose Ortiz-Marrero
It's Alive (TCM app) 1974. Larry Cohen's horror film about a newborn baby mutation killer and family love. Ultimately tender. Haunting Bernard Herrmann score.
 

Jake Lipson

Executive Producer
Premium
Joined
Dec 21, 2002
Messages
10,929
Real Name
Jake Lipson
I hope this gets an UHD disc release at some point in the future, because the presentation is tremendous.
I would be very surprised if Disney didn't do that eventually, but I think it will be a while. Their original deal for the theatrical release in October 2021 would probably have led to a disc release in early 2022. Obviously, the pandemic changed all that. For now, I think it is most valuable to them exactly where it is in order to act as a subscription driver for Disney+.

I might have to sign up for Disney+ just to see this.
That's exactly. what Disney wants you to say (and, because the monthly cost of Disney+ is less than the cost of a movie ticket, it's really easy to justify signing up for just one thing, even if you don't find other stuff you want to watch.). It is obviously the biggest thing to land as a Disney+ exclusive since The Mandelorian ended for the season.

But in a year or two, once they have additional high-profile exclusives like the Marvel shows, they will probably want to make money on it through a disc release. For a $75 million purchase price, they should maximize its value in every possible way. I know I would buy a disc as soon as it is made available. It would be great, too, if they could get the rights to include the Hamilton's America PBS documentary about the show from a while back, since that would be a great supplement to the movie.
 

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