What's cooking?

Johnny Angell

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No because the temp is lowered when I drop mine in. And for steak, one hour per is usually enough, unless it is 2” thick.

It is PFM, and it was a game changer when I learned the trick.
Never mind, another search explained PFM. The first search came up with something I can’t repeat here. :eek:
 
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DaveF

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I’d like to find an all purpose cooking chart for my sous vide but haven’t found one yet.

Here’s everything you’d want to know about Sous vide steak, with a time & temp table.

I use the Anova app with my Anova Sous vide and it’s got clear guides for cook temps and times for typical foods in there.
 

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Here’s everything you’d want to know about Sous vide steak, with a time & temp table.

I use the Anova app with my Anova Sous vide and it’s got clear guides for cook temps and times for typical foods in there.
Kenji at Serious Eats is my cooking God. If I want to know how to cook something, that is my 1st stop.
 

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I've listened to him on some podcasts he does and he pops up on other podcasts I listen to. And I've read some of his stuff on the web. I don't actively follow him, but I appreciate what he writes. And as you note he works with Anova on their sous vide recipes and guides.
 

Johnny Angell

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Here’s everything you’d want to know about Sous vide steak, with a time & temp table.

I use the Anova app with my Anova Sous vide and it’s got clear guides for cook temps and times for typical foods in there.
The Anova guide says an hour and 30’ at 129F for medium rare. Is that steak safe?
 

Johnny Angell

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Awesome! I love time-lapse videos!

I see some good looking steaks in there! What else you have in mind?
One of the by products of the carve, and it was expected, is a ...small roast...best I can describe it. Not quite sure what to do with it. The filets will go into a sous vide.
 

Johnny Angell

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Awesome! I love time-lapse videos!

I see some good looking steaks in there! What else you have in mind?
I forgot to write how easy they are to do. You need an iphone on a tripod and something you want to video. Annnnnd action! No settings to select, at least in the native camera app. I think I read your video session can be up to 40’ but the final video will be adjusted for a max time of 20 or 30 seconds.

PS: that was my first ever time lapse.
 

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One of the by products of the carve, and it was expected, is a ...small roast...best I can describe it. Not quite sure what to do with it. The filets will go into a sous vide.
Johnny, I go way back in this thread as a proponent of Sous vide (https://www.hometheaterforum.com/community/threads/whats-cooking.333909/page-43#post-4453037).

That said, and its simply my opinion, but the benefits of sous vide will be somewhat lost on tenderloin because, as the name suggests, it is already one of the tenderest cuts of meat you can get. I see the most amazing results on NY Strip.

Either way - enjoy those filets!
 

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Should be.

Killing bacteria is time and temperature. Low temperature, but long time.
I'd like to see more details on that. Cursory googling doesn't back that up.

Recommendations seem to be 160 degrees minimum to kill most food borne bacteria.

In a moment of weakness, we bought a whole beef tenderloin, sometimes called a pismo. Here’s a time lapse video of me breaking it down. I’ve noticed time lapse makes me look like I not what I’m doing. ;) \https://share.icloud.com/photos/0uoFHLeOQXAjBf_ixJBPWOUeg
Wow that is a LOT of scrap. But very cool video Johnny. You ever do a deer? Lot more lean but a loooot of work.
 

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I'd like to see more details on that. Cursory googling doesn't back that up.
I guess if you prove it wrong, then millions of sous vide-ers will suddenly die in a poof of logic! :D

I don't have time to google it right now. But sous vide (low and slow) is a popular and widely recognized method that's been used safely for years. My understanding is it's what professional kitchens have been using for decades (sous vide lots of steaks to meet, then sear them on demand to serve customers).
 

Johnny Angell

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I'd like to see more details on that. Cursory googling doesn't back that up.

Recommendations seem to be 160 degrees minimum to kill most food borne bacteria.



Wow that is a LOT of scrap. But very cool video Johnny. You ever do a deer? Lot more lean but a loooot of work.
Good lord no. I don’t consider taking an already prepared cut of beef, and breaking it down further, makes me an experienced butcher. A whole deer? I shudder at the thought, but would not turn down the venison.
 
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Johnny Angell

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Johnny, I go way back in this thread as a proponent of Sous vide (https://www.hometheaterforum.com/community/threads/whats-cooking.333909/page-43#post-4453037).

That said, and its simply my opinion, but the benefits of sous vide will be somewhat lost on tenderloin because, as the name suggests, it is already one of the tenderest cuts of meat you can get. I see the most amazing results on NY Strip.

Either way - enjoy those filets!
True, a filet starts out tender, but with sous vide I will be able to my maintain the desired level of doneness through almost the whole thickness of meat.
 
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When food sits between 40°F/4°C and 140°F/60°C, it is often said to be in the “danger zone” for bacterial growth. It’s between these temperatures that potentially harmful bacteria can thrive. But what is not often referenced is that danger—and, thus, safety—isn’t just about temperature. It’s also about time. “Most people, when they talk about food safety, they oversimplify,” explains Baldwin.

For example, the FDA recommends cooking chicken breast meat (which is comprised of 5 percent fat) to 165°F/74°C in order to pasteurize it. When the center of the meat reaches that temperature, virtually 100 percent of Salmonella is killed immediately. When brought to 160°F/71°C, it takes 14 seconds to kill the Salmonella. At 155°F/68°C, it takes 50 seconds. At 150°F/65.5°C, our favorite temperature for chicken, it takes 3 minutes. We don’t recommend cooking chicken at 136°F/58°C—it’s a little more like chicken sashimi, really—but you can. It will just take 69 minutes at that temperature to be safe.

With enough time, most food pathogens are killed at 130°F/54.5°C, according to the FDA and Baldwin. For our sous vide recipes, this is our magic number. We cook almost everything either at or above that temperature. (When cooking in a water bath set to 130°F/54.5°C, the food will eventually become that temperature as well.) As an extra precaution, if we plan to cook meat below our magic temperature, the first thing we do is sear it in a hot pan in order to kill off any bacteria on the surface before we circulate (for example, see Butter-Basted Rib-Eye Steak).
 

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Gotcha. I personally don't think sous vide is worth it for the types of food I enjoy (grilling is much more my style). But if I did do it I would definitely include a sear stage at some point.
 

Johnny Angell

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Gotcha. I personally don't think sous vide is worth it for the types of food I enjoy (grilling is much more my style). But if I did do it I would definitely include a sear stage at some point.
To each his own. When I sous vide a steak, i sear it in a pan after it’s done. What I like so much about sous vide is how accurate I can be in cooking the steak.
 
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DaveF

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Gotcha. I personally don't think sous vide is worth it for the types of food I enjoy (grilling is much more my style). But if I did do it I would definitely include a sear stage at some point.
Sous vide doesn't eliminate that aspect of the flavor profile. Sous vide for perfect cook, then grill- or pan-sear for final texture and flavor.

I'm not trying to sell you on sous vide. It's another tool in the kitchen. It's not fussy, but it's for me niche. And it takes longer: a filet can be grilled in about ten minutes. Sous vide takes an hour itself and you still need the sear at the end. So it's more time and more effort. But, done right, it's better than grilling. But, like spending for high-end HT gear, you're "paying" a premium for incremental improvements. I typically grill steaks, but sometimes I'm in the mood to go for the sous vide approach.

For me, where sous vide is great is for salmon filet and straight-from-the-freezer cuts of meat. Salmon on the grill is finicky: 30 seconds is the difference between perfect and mediocre. But sous vide salmon filet: perfect with minutes of buffer on the timing. And I can take a pork chop from the freezer and toss it into sous vide and get a good cook, no bother defrosting.

My recommendation is when you want an interesting new cooking tool to expand your options and maybe pursue a new aspect of "perfect" cooking, give sous vide a try. But you can certainly cook great without it.
 
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Johnny Angell

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Sous vide doesn't eliminate that aspect of the flavor profile. Sous vide for perfect cook, then grill- or pan-sear for final texture and flavor.

I'm not trying to sell you on sous vide. It's another tool in the kitchen. It's not fussy, but it's for me niche. And it takes longer: a filet can be grilled in about ten minutes. Sous vide takes an hour itself and you still need the sear at the end. So it's more time and more effort. But, done right, it's better than grilling. But, like spending for high-end HT gear, you're "paying" a premium for a incremental improvements. I typically grill steaks, but sometimes I'm in the mood to go for the sous vide approach.

Ffor me, where sous vide is great is for salmon filet and straight-from-the-freezer cuts of meat. Salmon on the grill is finicky: 30 seconds is the difference between perfect and mediocre. But sous vide salmon filet: perfect with minutes of buffer on the timing. And I can take a pork chop from the freezer and toss it into sous vide and get a good cook, no bother defrosting.

My recommendation is when you want an interesting new cooking tool to expand your options and maybe pursue a new aspect of "perfect" cooking, give sous vide a try. But you can certainly cook great without it.
When the steak is frozen, how much time do you add?
 

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