What's cooking?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by DaveF, Aug 24, 2014.

  1. Stan

    Stan Producer

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    Me again. Went shopping with a friend who has a monster SUV so could drive through the snow. Bought a really nice Dungeness crab, kind of a Pacific NW thing. They are fantastic, take a lot of cleaning and prep work but so much bigger and tastier than east coast crabs.

    I'll probably get 1/2 pound of meat, plus a lot of labor, but well worth it. I've bought the pasteurized, cleaned crab meat, but there must be a chemical additive or something going on, never taste nearly as good as fresh.
     
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  2. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    We gave them another try, roasted with olive oil and salt/pepper. We're still not fans. For me, the smell/flavor reminds me of a Chinese medicinal ointment, so that's hard to get over. :)
     
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  3. Stan

    Stan Producer

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    Understandable. We all have our likes and dislikes. I can eat almost anything except for squash and cucumbers, although I like pickles.

    I've also got that genetic thing where cilantro tastes like soap, so that ingredient is out.
     
  4. EricSchulz

    EricSchulz Producer

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    First time posting here! I have found that the New York Times Cooking app is a great resource...especially if I am at the store and unsure about what to make since the recipe is right on my phone. Tried this last night and it was quite delicious although I made a few minor modifications. It's Shrimp, Kale and Tomatoes. I added baby spinach and bay leaves and served it over quinoa thin spaghetti. Other than cleaning the shrimp the whole thing took about twenty minutes!
     

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  5. EricSchulz

    EricSchulz Producer

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    IMG_0229.JPG A friend posted the video for this recipe on Facebook and I finally got around to trying it...IT'S SO DELICIOUS! I LOVE going out for breakfast/brunch more than dinner and when I do, the first thing I look for are their takes on Eggs Benedict. This recipe is a restaurant quality dish that I would gladly have paid for! It's sweet potato pancakes, pepper jelly, sliced ham and poached eggs. I didn't have the pepper jelly so I substituted a bacon jam with red peppers and garlic. Absolutely heavenly! And considering I've NEVER made true poached eggs before I'm damn proud as to how this turned out!

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/bobby-flay/sweet-potato-green-onion-pancakes-with-poached-eggs-holiday-ham-and-pepper-jam.html
     
  6. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    That looks delicious. I also love breakfast/brunch and Eggs Benedict.

    I made a Cheesy Chicken Spinach Bacon Lasagna tonight that was very good.
     
  7. Sam Posten

    Sam Posten Moderator
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  8. ChristopherG

    ChristopherG Screenwriter

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    For Christmas this year I got a sous vide device. Finally gave it a test last weekend:

    First off I found this idea online to modify a Coleman cooler to serve as the cooking vessel:

    [​IMG]

    Cut a 2 3/8" hole and the anova sous vide device fits perfectly. The insulation of the cooler is the perfect vessel for this style of cooking.
    The device is bluetooth compatible so I can check on it from either the garage, deck of family room. I set the temperature to 150F

    [​IMG]
    Wait for the water to come to temperature and start prepping the chicken (my first choice for testing this out)
    Using my food sealer I took split chicken breasts and seasoned with salt and pepper, added a tablespoon of EVO and a sprig of rosemary and then sealed each one individually:
    [​IMG]
    I put six breasts into their warm bath and then set timer for four hours. This is what they looked like when pulled:

    [​IMG]
    The skin needs to be crisped so they then went on the Weber for 3-4 minutes:

    [​IMG]

    The result was some of the most moist, tender and flavorful chicken breasts we have ever eaten. I mean superb. Next experiment: Baby Back Ribs. For 12 hours....
     
  9. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    Very neat!
     
  10. Kevin Hewell

    Kevin Hewell Cinematographer

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    I find the technology pretty cool but I've never been a fan of sous-vide.
     
  11. ChristopherG

    ChristopherG Screenwriter

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    What did you not like?
     
  12. Alf S

    Alf S Banned
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    Looks tasty enough, but dang that's a LOT of work/time just for some semi basic chicken breasts. I think I'll stick with my Weber. :)
     
  13. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    It looks like it's more, but not much more, work than taking time to marinate the breasts before cooking, and then cooking. The benefit, as I understand it, is you're at no risk of under/over cooking the chicken on the grill. The final step is simply to brown the exterior for that extra flavor and texture.

    That said, I've got enough kitchen gadgets I don't use that I'm not ready to get a sous vide. But I'm convinced now it's a thing; a year ago I thought it was just a dumb idea.
     
  14. 854 Jan 27, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2017
    ChristopherG

    ChristopherG Screenwriter

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    Actually it wasn't much more work as Dave suggests and the good news is you can freeze the individual bags prior to cooking which makes it actually a breeze for later dinners. As for the time - it's all self regulated. Kinda set it and forget it. If you ever cook BBQ low and slow this is actually less work and "hover" time. I just cut up two full racks of baby back ribs into 3-4 rib portions, rubbed them down with a dry rub, added 3 drops of liquid smoke and sealed them up for their bath tomorrow. I'm going to throw at least 4 of those portions in the freezer for another time. Easy peasy.

    Don't get me wrong. I still love my Weber and Primo grills. This is just another weapon in my culinary arsenal. [emoji6]
     
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  15. Stan

    Stan Producer

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    Not to sound snarky, but it seems awfully "pretentious". Like what Alton Brown called a "unitasker". Yet then you have to broil things to crisp the skin? So it's kind of like a half-tasker.

    Like when you have to chop things up to put them in a food processor (which I will never purchase), just spend the extra ten seconds and finish the job with the knife.

    I'm just kidding, but it seems like a lot of effort for something that could be done much easier.:)
     
  16. ChristopherG

    ChristopherG Screenwriter

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    Easy doesn't always mean good. I get it. This isn't for everyone but if you haven't tried it or sampled what the result is then it is probably best to keep an open mind.
     
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  17. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    Not having a food processor is crazy talk!

    I don't use mine a lot, but when I need it, it's fantastic. Recent uses are:

    Grating a whole block of cheese in seconds.
    Making bread crumbs.
    Blending flour and butter for pie crust.
    Pulsing diced tomatoes for a bolognese sauce.
     
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  18. ChristopherG

    ChristopherG Screenwriter

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    I also have a food processor that gets used infrequently but when it does I'm really happy to have it. Hadn't thought about the pie crust idea..."food" for thought...
     
  19. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    Cook's Illustrated has a pie crust recipe that blends flour and butter in a food processor that then gets mixed in with more flour for the complete dough. It also uses Vodka to give liquid with less water. It's fussier than the standard of manually cutting butter or margarine into flour, but it turns out well.
     
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  20. ChristopherG

    ChristopherG Screenwriter

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    Funny I just saw something in the last couple days about using vodka in pie crust.
     

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