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What Year Produced The Most "Great" Films?

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by SeanSKA, Oct 1, 2018.

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  1. AnthonyClarke

    AnthonyClarke Screenwriter

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    For me, 1939 and 1942. If I had to choose!
     
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  2. Thomas T

    Thomas T Producer

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    Jose, I'm really just a pushover and a softie! In addition to Junebug, I love raindrops on roses, whiskers on kittens, bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens. :)
     
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  3. Cineman

    Cineman Second Unit

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    Ah! Now we've moved from "Great" movies to "Favorite Things"...

    Then I'll have to go with 1958 being my Favorite Movie Year;)
    But that would be a different thread, I know.
     
  4. Message #44 of 77 Oct 11, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2018
    ScottHM

    ScottHM Supporting Actor

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    I've never seen any of these films. They don't sound interesting. I think they started phasing out "great" films when I was a kid.

    ---------------
     
  5. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
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    I wouldn't say that as some of those films are really good. Matter of fact, I'm going to watch "Breaking Away" again on Twilight Time's Blu-ray that I haven't watched yet. It's a really good coming of age film set in Blommington, Indiana where I once lived for many years. A great college town.
     
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  6. Message #46 of 77 Oct 12, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
    Cineman

    Cineman Second Unit

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    Well, if you are under the age of 40, you could be more right than you know. To be sure, there were some very good movies made in the past 30-40 years. Many very well made. High concept. High quality production values. Lots of visceral stimulation, eye-candy, loud soundtracks and all that. Passionate performances by the actors. But precious few truly "Great" movies have been made since, oh, the late 1970s or so.

    Luckily, virtually all of the "Great" movies ever made are available on some form of fairly high quality home video. I suppose we will never again achieve the impact of seeing them in a more formal setting; in a darkened theater among 100s of strangers, most of whom have never seen the movie before. That was a critical element for their impact because of the way they were made to begin with. But in terms of sight and sound, many affordable home theater set ups can compete with and beat the way audiences experienced most of them originally.
     
  7. Message #47 of 77 Oct 12, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
    Martin_Teller

    Martin_Teller Stunt Coordinator

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    You kids, get offa my lawn! This is absurd. Older movies have the weight of history and canonization (and for many, nostalgia) behind them. But there are just as many exciting, thoughtful, innovative filmmakers around the world as there ever were.

    Using my own standard of "great" (let's face it, we're never going to agree on what movies are great), I counted films that I'd rated 90 or higher. And 2003 came out on top, with 11:

    Linda Linda Linda
    The Wayward Cloud
    The New World

    Lady Vengeance
    Who's Camus Anyway?
    Kong que (Peacock)
    Murderball
    Serenity
    The Curse of the Were-Rabbit
    Grizzly Man
    Noriko's Dinner Table

    However, only the first three make my personal top 100 list. 1963, although it only has 10 "great films" (one fewer than 2003) rates a whopping SIX on my top 100:

    Mahanagar (The Big City)
    8 ½
    High and Low
    I Fidanzati
    Winter Light
    Revenge of a Kabuki Actor

    The Servant
    Crisis: Behind a Presidential Commitment
    I Compagni (The Organizer)
    The Silence

    So in my book, 1963 is the winner. But the idea that few great movies have been made in the past 40 years is utter nonsense.
     
  8. Keith Cobby

    Keith Cobby Cinematographer

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    Me too in term of 'greatness'. From an enjoyment perspective, 1956 was a good year for me.
     
  9. bujaki

    bujaki Cinematographer

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    Good list for 1963, Martin.

    I'd propose 1932. Great year because that's when the talkies really learned how to talk and film was on its way to becoming a new and independent art form, separate from its great, silent sibling.
     
  10. bujaki

    bujaki Cinematographer

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    I cry when Snow White lies in state and when Bambi's mother dies. Also when Dumbo's mother sings Baby Mine to him.
    And when Ingrid cries when she realizes Roberto will die in For Whom the Bell Tolls...who can resist those glorious close-ups of Bergman in tears? But I wish Ernest Lehman had kept the acerbic songs that were excised from Sound of Music so that all had not been whiskers on kittens. And Ally McGraw dying of Hollywood disease and looking wonderful till the bitter end was just too much for my 20-year-old soul. My future wife and I howled with laughter (insensitive souls).
    Going back to June, for years I've asked people of my cultural background about her, and nobody seems to like her. To each his own...
     
  11. Ross Gowland

    Ross Gowland Agent

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    Great suggestions so far. Mine would be 1968:

    2001: A Space Odyssey
    Planet of the Apes
    If....
    Night of the Living Dead
    Rosemary's Baby
    Oliver!
    Romeo and Juliet
    Witchfinder General
    Yellow Submarine
    Hang 'Em High
    Barbarella
    Bullitt
    Head
    Faces
    Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
    Carry On Up the Khyber
    The Devil Rides Out
    L'Enfance Nue
    The Girl on a Motorcycle
    Monterey Pop
    Spirits of the Dead
    Teorama
    Up the Junction
    Where Eagles Dare
     
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  12. Message #52 of 77 Oct 13, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2018
    Cineman

    Cineman Second Unit

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    True, but we can get hints about which movies had so much going for them they inspired generations of discussion, volumes of books written about them, scene by scene breakdowns, sometimes shot by shot, serious analysis of them by international critics on their cinematic merits.

    Long before some of us were yelling at kids to get off our lawn, we could sit with people much older than us and discuss a viewing of, say, PSYCHO, LAWRENCE OF ARABIA, 2001: ASO or BONNIE AND CLYDE for hours and still not cover all of the elements that made them "Great". Sometime by the end of the 1970s, a post-screening discussion of almost every movie we saw lasted about 10 minutes and it was time to move on. We didn't hate them. There just wasn't much there to discuss. Not sure there were more than 5 since then that warranted more consideration. From a cinematic point of view, I mean. Yes, even with young people we hadn't shouted off our lawns.

    AFI stopped producing their "100 Greatest..." tv specials because, as far as I know, they could not come up with any more extraneous categories that might include more than 5-6 movies made in the past 40 years that would pull a younger audience with titles they might be familiar with.
     
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  13. RICK BOND

    RICK BOND Stunt Coordinator

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    1959 ! I have many Bluray movies from this year in my collection !
     
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  14. Message #54 of 77 Oct 13, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2018
    Cineman

    Cineman Second Unit

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    I suppose I'll further establish my shouting at the kids on my lawn creds by submitting that, as far as "Great Movie Years" go (not really this thread's subject, but a good one too), almost any year in the 1950s and 1960s was amazing and could qualify as a Great Movie Year, imo. Those were years when many filmmakers, directors, writers, producers and so on who had become movie fans if not actually cut their professional teeth in their youth on silent films were still highly active and often producing some of their best work; Hitchcock, Wilder, Ford, Wyler, Hawks, Cukor, LeRoy, Fellini, Kurasawa, Wise, Lean, Minnelli, to a lesser extent Chaplin, Welles and Capra, to name a few.

    And in those same years you had "upstarts" coming in who learned from and stood on the shoulders of those giants (therefore, did not totally abandon their powerful, effective and painstakingly incrementally developed cinematic grammar going all the way back to those silent movie years, but instead took on the challenge to improve and expand it) like Kubrick, Penn, Sturges, Frankenheimer, Lewis (yes, Jerry), Kramer, Nichols, Leone and so many more.
     
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  15. SeanSKA

    SeanSKA Stunt Coordinator

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    Give them a shot. "Manhattan" may be Woody Allen's best film (though perhaps problematic in many ways in this day and age). Some here have called "Apocalypse Now" "messy"- it's messiness is part of it's brilliance
     
  16. ScottHM

    ScottHM Supporting Actor

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    I haven't skipped these because they're "bad" movies, but because I don't believe I would enjoy watching them. It's OK.

    ---------------
     
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  17. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
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    You never know if you don't try as I think you'll enjoy "Breaking Away".
     
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  18. Thomas T

    Thomas T Producer

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    Listen to your instincts. Personally I think Being There, All That Jazz, Manhattan and China Syndrome are all fine films. The others are dispensable. But just because I liked something (or disliked) I would never push it on someone who didn't want to see it. I have my own movie radar which works just fine and when I've gone against it and seen something that my movie radar screamed AVOID I regretted it. When friends recommend films that I know I don't want to see, instead of saying "I'd rather clean out the litter box with my tongue", I politely say, "Thanks, I'll keep an eye out for it" that way it avoids lectures on how I really would like it if I gave it a chance :). Life is too short, you can't see everything. See what you want. One man's masterpiece is another man's trash (and vice versa).
     
  19. Message #59 of 77 Oct 16, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2018
    Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
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    How do you know its trash or a masterpiece if you don’t see it? I don’t know what you mean by pushing it on someone as we’re all adults here and talking movies.
     
  20. battlebeast

    battlebeast Cinematographer

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    KRAMER V. KRAMER was an awful film and one of the worst best pictures. The performances were great; the story mediocre and the ending... atrocious! But the other films listed were very good.
     

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