what to get?

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by MatthewTh, Apr 4, 2005.

  1. MatthewTh

    MatthewTh Auditioning

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    OK here is my problem...
    I want to get better rear channel effects in movies and need to know if a speaker upgrade will fix this problem.

    I currently have:
    Yamaha 5560 receiver
    onkyo sks-ht500 sattelite speakers and sub
    cerwin vega e76c center channel
    all the speakers are connected with monster cable, and the DVD player is connected to the receiver with a optical digital toslink.

    I was looking at some cerwin vega bookshelf speakers like the v-5m or e706 to go with my center, but I don't know if the v-5m would be matched with it. Or I've seen a polk audio set for 450$ at HH gregg the rm6750. Money is a factor in the solution but I want to get the best results for my budget.

    Any advice would be helpful, I'm still kind of a rookie at all of these things but am trying to become more informed. Thanks for any help.

    Matt
     
  2. Garrett Lundy

    Garrett Lundy Producer

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    Yes!
     
  3. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    A speaker upgrade may help, but first play with the system you've got.

    Have you ever calibrated your system? If not, DEFINITELY do that first. It involves using an SPL meter and calibration disc such as Avia. If you've never done this, use the search function on the forum or ask questions here.
     
  4. MatthewTh

    MatthewTh Auditioning

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    I've gone into the settings turning the power up and down for the surrounds and to little differance overall except for the center channel, it blows the others away. The rear ones still hardly got above a whisper. I've never really heard of spl meters or calibration discs.
     
  5. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    You definitely should calibrate then. Trying to setup speakers by ear may sound easy, but it's almost impossible to do it really well.

    An SPL meter measures the Sound Pressure Level. You can buy one at Radio Shack. You place it in your seating position and run through each speaker using the test tones built into the receiver, or better yet a calibration disc. Set each speaker so that it has an equal SPL at the listening location. This should make your current system sound MUCH better. The SPL meter and a calibration disc could probably be had for $60 total if you're willing to use ebay. Probably closer to $80-90 if you buy them new.

    It's money well spent. Even if you bought a new system, you'd still need the calibration stuff to get the most out of your purchase.
     

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