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What to do? (1 Viewer)

disneyhound

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Hi Folks, first time poster to this forum. I recently had my old surround system go down. The Amp would "pop" and go into protection mode. After some on-line searching, and several attempts at a remedy, I decided to replace my 10 year-old plus amp. :emoji_thumbsup:

I have not yet received the new AV system, but have downloaded the manual and picture of the back. I have been reading of the advantage of having both the audio and the video controlled by the amp. Most everything seems straightforward. DVD, use component video and digital coaxial audio.

My confusion, and the question of my post, how do I connect my cable TV to the AV system. There is no CATV jack on the back of the AV component. I was planing to to have only the component video jacks from the AV receiver connected to the TV and let the AV do all the switching.

I only have basic cable, no cable box is involved, just the standard TV cable coming out the wall, to the VCR, to the TV. Is there an adapter/converter that is available that would split the video and audio to RCA jacks, or S-video. What am I missing here.

The idea of not having to switch the audio, and the TV, get everything adjusted to watch TV, then switch each component for a video, then again for a DVD, but let the one AV amp do it all is appealing.

Thanks for taking the time to read my post. :D
 

Robert_J

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Your VCR is your adapter to convert basic cable to video/audio to be used by your receiver. Depending on the TV, it could be used as well if it has fixed level audio outputs.

For ease of switching audio/video sources, I suggest a Harmony remote. It doesn't matter what your configuration is, it will easily handle switching if set up properly.

-Robert
 

drobbins

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I would suggest a all in one remote control. I use a Harmony. This style is programmed by activity, not specific equipment. You press "Watch Movie" and all your equipment is automatically set on the right settings. Same with watch TV etc...

I agree with Robert who posted while I was typing.:frowning:
 

disneyhound

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Thanks Robert. If I understand your post, I use the VCR as the converter for my CATV. But, doesn't that mean that the VCR needs to be turned on to watch the TV?
 

Joseph DeMartino

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Robert and Dave had offered one solution. But depending on the make and model, your receiver may be able to convert other analog signals (like s-video or composite video) to component output - in which case you would run one of those cables from your VCR to the receiver, and then the component cables from the receiver to the TV.

It would help if you would list the make and model of all the components, as that would let people familiar with each of them comment on your opitons, or download the manuals themselves and try to find some answers. (AV manuals appear to be written in a kind of code, and it can take awhile to learn how to read them.
htf_images_smilies_smile.gif
)

Regards,

Joe
 

disneyhound

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Thanks Joe:

I went through my owners manuals, yes I saved them... :D

Below is an image of the connections from the back of my Panasonic TV:



Below is an image of the connections from the back of my JVC DVD/VCR:



Below is an image of the connections from the back of my Yamaha AV:



I hope posting a link to a photo is OK. I assumed that some pictures would be better than my explanation.

My current configuration has my CATV into DVD/VCR, then CATV out to TV. Also out of DVD/VCR is Component Video to TV and Coaxial digital to old Surround amp. Have recently run audio and video directly to TV from DVD/VCR due to Surround amp failure.
 

Joseph DeMartino

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Yup. Your other alternative is to put a splitter on the cable coming from the wall, and run one end to the VCR and the other directly into the TV. That way you can watch stuff using the TV speakers when sound isn't an issue and switch on the VCR when it is. Since you only have basic cable, the best you are probably getting in terms of audio is stereo or Dolby Pro Logic, anyway. Using the TV speakers would not be that much of a sacrifice.

It would still help to have the make and model for all this stuff. Based on your descriptions of everything I'm assuming that you do not have an HDTV or HD service. If you did you could run an optical or digital coax cable from the TV's digital output to the AV receiver and you'd be all set.

Regards,

Joe
 

Robert_J

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As others have stated, you will have to keep the VCR on and use it to change channels if you want to use that to convert basic cable to a viewable picture.

On your post above, your TV does have audio outputs so you may not need to use your VCR as a converter. Turn on the TV and receiver. Set the receiver to the proper input (all of this can be programmed to 1 button on any Harmony model remote) and you will have simulated surround sound via the receiver.

We ask for model numbers because we don't know if your audio outputs are fixed or variable (level changes as you change the TV volume). Fixed outputs are what you want. Your TV may have both and a menu option selects each.

-Robert
 

Joseph DeMartino

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OK. I didn't realize that you have a combo DVD/VCR. Well, that makes things straight forward. You'll get the best picture using the component connections. Your best bet is actually to split the coax coming from the wall, as I mentioned above. One line to TV's antenna input, one to the VCR. That way you can watch TV with the TV's speakers alone. Run the component video from the DVD/VCR to the TV. Then run the TV's audio outputs (left and right) to the new receiver. Don't run any video connections from the DVR/VCR to the receiver. In your setup they aren't necessary.

If you hook everything up as I suggest above, you can watch cable using the TVs speakers and turn the receiver on only when you want surround sound. And you can also watch tapes and DVDs using either sound system.

Again, the actual model numbers for your equipment, rather than just pictures of the connections, will allow people to give more useful suggestions, because that way we can check all the specific features of all your gear. Snippets like the pictures don't really give us enough information to work with.

Regards,

Joe
 

disneyhound

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You haven't heard my TV speakers! LOL! One thing that was cool with my old surround amp was the ability to have the audio sound sooo much better while watching TV. The broadcasts in Stereo are much improved when not routed through the TV. My TV does have the ability to set the audio to fixed, which is what I have done in the past. I read somewhere that you can ruin the surround by not muting the TV speakers; is that true?

My DVD/VCR combo is a JVC HR-XVC18. I cannot find the model of the TV, it is a Panasonic, but the manual lists about 10 models on the cover.

Thanks Joe
 

disneyhound

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Thanks Robert. As I do not yet have my new AV, Christmas Gift, I will try you suggestion when I can. Looking at the back of my soon-to-be new Yamaha HTR-6040, it is a bit intimidating. My old surround amp had about 1/2 the connections.

You are correct about my TV having both variable and Fixed audio output, but you have to enter the TV's menu structure and locate it, then switch it. I would not want to have to do that every time I wanted to go from TV to DVD. I just set it to fixed and did not use the TV speakers.

I appreciate your time and suggestions;

Patrick
 

disneyhound

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10-4 on the component connection giving the best video from the DVD player. I was hoping to pass all the video/audio to the AV receiver, then allow that one receiver to control the system, pass back the video from whatever source through the component connections to the TV.

It sounds like I need a new TV to accomplish this goal. But, times as they are, I can't justify the expense right now. When I get my new AV, I will try any and all suggestions offered. Thanks for your responses.

Patrick
 

Scott Merryfield

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This is how I would make the connection... in fact, I do have my TV setup this way when I do not want to use the cable box. The only difference is I run the digital optical output (instead of the L/R analog outputs) of my TV to the receiver. This way I can get DD5.1 if the station is broadcasting in that format. With the analog connections, you will only get stereo.

Look to see if your TV has a digital audio output -- either optical or coaxial. That will give you the best sound, and not require you to use the VCR.
 

disneyhound

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My TV is pre-optical and coaxial, at least for the model that I have, the only output seems to be right/left audio RCA jacks.

Thanks Scott.

Patrick
 

Rick Steverson

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Patrick,

People seem to be missing the point that your on basic (non-digital) cable.

If you want the receiver in the loop, I would go for a simple stereo connection (RCA cables) between the TV's audio out and the DTV/CBL input on the receiver for your tv audio. That appears to be the best for your set up. No need to use the VCR connection.

If the TV audio output is fixed, the receiver will do the mute and vary volume. If the TV audio output is variable, changing either tv volume or receiver volume works, but causes some minor problems as you may wind up switching back and fore between the tv volume and receiver volume. At some point you will get blasted away when you switch to VCR/DVD source if the last person had the TV volume turned way down and was turning the receiver way up to compensate.

And, yes, if you use the VCR for audio output from cable, the VCR has to be on.
 

disneyhound

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Thanks Rick. That was the set-up I was using with my old surround amp, and likely the way I will go forward when I get the new AV system.

This whole thread was started because I was reading a PDF manual of my new AV that I downloaded. The description that the one component could control all audio/video streaming to the TV seemed so "sexy" (kind of appropriate). Hence the issue with how to connect the CATV to the AV...

Thanks everyone for participating.
 

disneyhound

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I was in the electronics department of our local "big-box" store and I was looking at DTV converter boxes with a friend. He doesn't have cable. The converter box had the normal CATV input, and component video and stereo audio outputs. The converter box also said analog pass through. I believe this means that analog signals pass through the converter as they are. If I connect my basic cable to the converter box, would this provide the connection from CATV to component video to the AV receiver I have been searching for?
 

Robert_J

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The converter box had an F connector on it. It is the same type of connecter used for CATV connections but not the same function. Yes, it will pass through analog signals but do nothing with them. Nothing. It will not strip the audio off of them and send it through the RCA jacks. It will only do that when converting digital ATSC to analog.

-Robert
 

disneyhound

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Thanks Robert! I was looking at the Zenith DTT-901. Here is a photo of the rear connections.



If I understand your post correctly, the analog signals will not exit the converter box via the RCA connections, but only through the F connector.

Patrick
 

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