what to do with left over cable?

Discussion in 'Accessories, Cables, and Remotes' started by PeterK, Sep 8, 2004.

  1. PeterK

    PeterK Supporting Actor

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    Our satellite guy came the other day to do the wiring for our second receiver. He did A descent job but he left the cable empty box and 2 chuncks of 75 ohm coax sitting in our side yard. although it ticked me off that he didn't clean up, I do have a 3' and a 12' piece or coax cable now. I am wondering what I should with them. If I put standard AV jack on them will they be good for all apps. including AV cable Digital coax and Component cable. Is this cable any good? it is made by the company vextra.
    thanks
     
  2. Stephen Hopkins

    Stephen Hopkins HW Reviewer
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    It's probably some sort of RG6, possibly even quat-shield. W/ the right connectors it should make very good digital coax or component video cables. Is it marked w/a brand? If so, does it have a number signifying the type of cable? If so you could find out what coresponding connectors you could use and make some nice cables. Good connectors, however, aren't cheap, so expect to spend upwards of $3 per connector for the good stuff. Also connectors like Canare require special tools to crimp them on which can drive the cost up to more than you would want to spend on a simple project to utilize some excess cable. Solder on connectors, however, require no special tools (other than a soldering iron), so if you're good w/ an iron then you could go that route. The easiest way would be basic crimp on F connectors w/ F-to-RCA adapters.

    Hope this helps [​IMG]
     
  3. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Examine the ends of the center conductor where it was cut. If its all copper colored, it might be worth using. If the middle of the wire looks steel colored, you've got copper over steel in which case just junk it.
     
  4. RomanSohor

    RomanSohor Second Unit

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    Ebay perhaps?
     
  5. PeterK

    PeterK Supporting Actor

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    Stephen, I assume you meant $30 because $3 is nothing. The exact markings on the wire are "vextra RG6 cu 3000 mhz 75 ohm" And it is copper all the way through, not steel
     
  6. Stephen Hopkins

    Stephen Hopkins HW Reviewer
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    Nope, $3 for Canare crimp on RCAs. These are true 75ohm and broadcast quality. These are what TV and Movie studios use (although they usually use BNC, not RCA). But even at $3 a plug, for a length of component video cable that's $18 just for RCAs.
     
  7. Stephen Hopkins

    Stephen Hopkins HW Reviewer
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    Nope, $3 for Canare crimp on RCAs. These are true 75ohm and broadcast quality. These are what TV and Movie studios use (although they usually use BNC, not RCA). But even at $3 a plug, for a length of component video cable that's $18 just for RCAs.
     
  8. PeterK

    PeterK Supporting Actor

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    What is BNC? Is there a standard crimper that will crimp things like RCA and coax (CATV type) cables. if so I think the computer dept. at my school will have a crimper lying around that I could use. Just how do I go about putting an end on my cables? I have never done it before, RCA or coax, I've only ever made a CAT5 cable for networking
     

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