What sources does calibration improve?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Aaron Gould, Jan 30, 2003.

  1. Aaron Gould

    Aaron Gould Stunt Coordinator

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    I picked up a Toshiba 57HDX82 about a month ago, and so far it seems pretty good. I watch a lot of hockey, so the games look fairly decent on the bigger screen! (I moved up from a 27" regular TV.)

    My question is... what input sources does a professional calibration improve?

    The component inputs for DVD are a given, but what about the other lower quality inputs like the cable, s-video, composite and DVI?

    I'm viewing satellite (Bell ExpressVu in Canada) via S-Video as my TV programming. I also use the S-Video connector (and occasionally composite connector) for video games (ie. Dreamcast).

    Will ALL my sources look better, or just mainly the DVD on the composite connectors? Will the difference be night and day, or just a slight noticeable improvement?
     
  2. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    It depends on what you include in your calibration session? Are you getting an oil change variety calibration or a tune up variety?

    When you take your car in for a tune up, do you ask the mechanic the same things? Will your car behave night and day different after your tune up? Can the mechanic even answer something like this without looking at your car?

    Of course not ...

    Maybe you see a whole lot of difference, maybe you see none. Since we cannot crawl into your head ... we cannot understand your value system.

    However ... if your TV is out of focus, it is so for all signals, not just DVD or HD. Some things are universal, some are signal specific.

    Sometimes it is like taking an 80% image to 100% ... sweet.

    But for cable, it is like taking a 30% image to 35% ... slightly less crappy, ... or only half a crud sandwich ... and not a whole one. [​IMG]

    Everything depends on where you start out ... and no one can know that. We just know where it should end up ... that is a known point.

    But the vast majority of those that have had it done for RPTV's pretty much do swear by it.

    Regards
     
  3. David Lorenzo

    David Lorenzo Stunt Coordinator

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    Michael.

    What about grayscale tracking? Will it be spot on for NTSC cable signals? I understand that OTA broadcasts are low in resolution and full of interference, but will the colors at least be accurate?
     
  4. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    Unfortunately not. Grayscale for NTSC will be only be closer, but the variability of the signal will make accuracy there literally impossible.

    Some channels are too bright ... others too dark ... some have the tint all wrong, some have the colour sat too high or low ... All this affects grayscale ... so unless you sit and watch a test pattern all day ... NTSC is a lost cause.

    When we do it to DVD ... your base is correct, but then you introduce the NTSC variability and maybe it varies by 1000K to 1500K in either direction.

    And while we are at it ... HDTV is also showing this extreme variability even now which makes calibrating the HD section a questionable proposition at best.

    Regards
     
  5. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    I also was wondering about this. When you set grey scale do you do it once for all inputs or is there a seperate grey scale for each input. I'm assuming that there is only one and it affects all inputs. This would naturally make all sources(inputs) look better right?
     
  6. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    Urban Myth ... Grayscale can be set up by input on a TV.

    Toshiba, Hitachi, Pioneer, Sony, Mits, RCA, Panny all CANNOT be set up by input.

    What can sometimes be set up is signal type ... aka ... 480i/480p/1080i/720p.

    Grayscale is typically set up for the base grayscale controls in the TV based on your preferred signal source ... 480i/p ... etc ...

    So I essentially set up your TV based on your DVD player ... say. Now let's run the same test patterns on the S-video, the composite video, the ant, the HD section.

    If we took grayscale readings of the test patterns now ... you would see something like thing.

    Pre-cal.

    Component Video - 10000K
    S-video - 10400K
    Composite - 9700K
    HD - 11000K

    Now Post Cal using DVD player on component.

    Component video - 6500K
    S-video - 6800K
    Composite - 6400K
    HD - 7000K

    This is what typically happens when we calibrate for one grayscale. There is a somewhat global influence on every thing else in the TV. The other stuff may not be exact, but it will be much closer than where it started.

    Regards
     

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