What sort of Board Games do you Play

BobO'Link

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Is this a kids game, or all ages?
All ages - well... 14+ on the box so, like always, depends on how your kids "get" these type games. My 10yo granddaughter did OK (and plays these type games with us fairly regularly). Originally I was going to get a 2nd copy for my son and his kids. His youngest son (almost 6) absolutely *loves* dinosaurs (kid knows dozens more than me and pronounces them all correctly) and I thought it would be good for them. After watching a game play video (while the kickstarter was still live) I decided it was too much for him for at least a few more years so didn't add the 2nd copy. Instead he'll get a copy of "Dino Hunt" I purchased a couple of years ago and put back.

It's a worker placement/resource management type game and requires forward planning for some actions. You're essentially capturing and farming dinosaurs while building enclosures in which to hold them.
 
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BobO'Link

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My oldest granddaughter (13 - 14 in early December) spent the night (my son, daughter-in-law, and their 3 kids - ages 4, 6, and 8 are at the house a few days) so while the little kids were busy doing other stuff this morning I asked her to pick a game for us to play. She came back with "Horrified." I played it solo and with my oldest grandson (16) and son in the month after I purchased it but not since.

We played a game with by randomly selecting The Mummy, Dracula, and The Wolf Man, a combo of "easy, med, difficult" monsters (when I played before I didn't find any of them all that difficult to beat). We beat them - barely - and she wanted to play again (that doesn't happen all that often) so rather than another random selection I suggested playing with the other "3" - The Creature from the Black Lagoon, The Invisible Man, and Frankenstein/Bride of Frankenstein. Different "hero" cards/abilities so it would be more "fresh." She blind selected the hero who can move anywhere on the board as an action (almost overpowered - but has 1 fewer actions to offset this ability). With her playing that hero we had a much easier time beating the monsters and didn't use any of the Special Ability cards she earned rescuing villagers.

I was quite surprised that she really enjoyed the game and indicated she'd like to play again some time. Like me, she'd like to see an expansion to add other classic monsters.
 
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BobO'Link

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A few years back I purchased Agricola (the Z-Man, 5 player w/animeeple version) on sale at a very good price. It's been unopened all this time as I just didn't think the grandkids would/could glom onto this one at younger ages. So... They're older and I think (actually know) they could now handle the mechanics so I move it to the top of the unplayed pile for us to get on the table.

As I'm looking over my Amazon board game wish list I see that the expansion, "Farmers of the Moors" - the OOP Z-Man version, is in stock with a few copies - and it's priced lower than the new "Revised" version. Being a completest with some (most actually) board games I take a chance, in spite of one review saying "You'll get the Lookout Revised instead of Z-Man" (the photo *and* description clearly shows and states Z-Man) and order a copy. Of course it's the new "Revised" version of the expansion that arrives.

While waiting for it to arrive and just in case I got the "Revised" edition I did some looking around to see if it could still be used with the Z-Man edition. It seems that it can with a bit of tweaking. However, the sole reference I find the guy has the German edition of Agricola and writes poorly (or maybe it's that, never having played the base game, I just don't know what he's talking about) so I begin to doubt that it's all that "easy" to incorporate.

So now the conundrum is either keep the Revised version and figure out how to incorporate it into the base game, just return it as "not matching the site description" and be content with the Z-Man, or purchase a copy of the Revised edition of Agricola to avoid any integration issues. After all, everything I'm now reading indicates the Lookout Revised edition is the version all future expansions/modifications will be published to use, essentially making my unopened Z-Man copy a "collector item".

Well... a day later, Amazon Warehouse put a few copies of the Lookout (not Mayfair) printing of the Revised Acgricola up in "Like New - in original box" condition for ~$40. You guessed it - I took a chance. I'm pleased to say that what arrived is *new* in box with original shrink wrap and no damage to the box.

Now I just need to get it to the table to see if I wasted all that effort...
 

BobO'Link

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I've been bugging my oldest grandson to come over and play board games with me once or twice a week after I get home from work (around 4:15). He's not yet done that but *did* come over today and we spent the afternoon playing nothing but new-to-us games.

We started with one I've been wanting to get to the table for some time: Lords of Waterdeep. It's surprisingly quick and easy to play. A mostly worker placement game with quests to complete and some hidden objectives to provide end game bonus points it adds different actions with buildings (action spaces) players can purchase and put in place for anyone to use (you get a bonus any time someone uses one of your buildings). We both enjoyed the game and feel it would play better with 3 or more players, although it's perfectly OK with 2. We each played slightly different strategies and I can see several others that would be quite valid.

Lords of Waterdeep:
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A winner - and I'll now purchase the expansion as this one will be played again.

I then brought out the others I'd selected as the day's picks: Wingspan, Palace of Mad King Ludwig (one we've played once before and would like to try again), Deus, Citadels (the 2016 edition), Ethnos, and Eight Minute Empire: Legends. I had him select the next game out of that short list. He looked over the unfamiliar ones (Wingspan, Deus, Ethnos) proclaiming them all interesting sounding and selected "Citadels" commenting "I've seen that one in your games before and have wanted to play it." As I'm breaking the seal he notices "Eight Minute Empire: Legends" and comments on the title. I tell him that, supposedly, you can play a game in 8 minutes - if you've played before and know what to do. He changes his mind and asks for that one instead.

So we play Eight Minute Empire: Legends. It took a while to get going as I'd not read up on it before cracking open the box. You guessed it - we took far longer than 8 minutes to play. In this one, a row of cards you purchase control your movements on a "world" of 4 random tiles. You have a very limited money supply so have to make some tough decisions about just which card to purchase. Hopefully that expensive one will come down in price and you'll snag it before an opponent does (cards slide down as purchased so they gradually become less expensive). You place and move "armies" on the board to conquer regions over the course of 12 turns.

Eight Minute Empire : Legends on the table for play.
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We both enjoyed this one, again agreeing it would likely play better with 3 or more players and that we'd like to play again but not today. Too many other games calling...

We then played Citadels. Since it was a first time play for both of us we opted for the recommended setup. This one's very simple but quite fun. He kept commenting on the "Head games" it forces you to play trying to outguess your opponent. Each round you select a new role card from a "deck" of 8, each with a unique ability, while also removing roles to make things more random. In a 2 player game you each will receive 2 role cards and play each card once per round. You either get 2 coins or draw 2 cards, keeping 1 of the cards. You then either "construct" a building (a card from your hand) if you have enough coin or pass to the next player. The first player to construct 8 buildings triggers end game with points coming from the value of buildings and the variety of buildings in your town,

Citadels (2016 edition):
1598145565646.png

While again agreeing it needs more than 2 players to reach its full potential we decided it's quite fun with just 2 and played a 2nd game. This, too, will see more table time.

So that's 3 winners played this afternoon and 3 games we fully believe his mom and sisters will enjoy.
 

BobO'Link

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A few bargains pulled out my game junkie and I picked up:

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We really enjoy Carcassonne and several of the stand alone versions. This one sounded pretty neat.

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A "diving" game - you have divers who are going into the depths to obtain treasures and artifacts.

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A cute looking with interesting looking play puzzle type tile laying game.

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Build an ant farm with tiles. Tile selection is similar to Queendomino's dragon track.

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Another interesting sounding tile laying/resource gathering game.

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Another expansion for Smallworld - a game we really enjoy. Like with Carcassonne, I have most of the expansions and add ons for this one.

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Since I picked up the revised base game and Farmers of the Moors I figured I might as well get this too.

Now to find/make the time to play them all...
 
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BobO'Link

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I've had a chance to play Gingerbread House and Micropolis with my 10yo granddaughter. I'm happy to say she really enjoyed both of them with a slight nod towards Micropolis.

She's been at my house for several days this past week after not coming over for several weeks. She's taken advantage of it to have grandma make some of her favorite dishes for supper and to play games with me.

To that end we've played Carcassonne a few times with one of them seeing me throw in the "Inns and Cathedrals" expansion, along with its rules, to shake things up a bit. She did quite well with that one and came within 9 points of a victory! Had she just dropped a couple of her spare meeples on some open farmland she'd have pulled out the win. We had lots of smaller farms in this game with each touching multiple completed cities. She's not yet gotten the hang of farmers but did complete several larger cities with one of them having a cathedral to get those bonus points. 2 of her cities scored 24+ points - quite good. It also helps that I don't go all-in with strategy when it's just the 2 of us by not using the city stealing tactics I use with her 17yo brother.

We've played several rounds of Micropolis. She's not yet won a game but has come close. I haven't cut her any slack on this one as she "gets" all the scoring methods and has done a few true cut-throat moves. :) Some of the finer points to scoring pass her by (the things where it might be better to pick up the first tile rather than pay a "soldier" for the 2nd as the point difference works out to a single point and you give up that "soldier" you may really want to keep for bonus points later) but overall she does quite well.

We played "Gingerbread House" once and both of us liked it - but we played it wrong when laying down tiles to collect gingerbread (we layed some new tiles directly over others - can't do that - new ones played have to overlap 2 existing tiles). At least both of us did it and we now know better. The *right* way makes for a bit of a tougher game.

And a new shipment of games came in yesterday. This shipment included:

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I'm most excited about "Clank! Adventuring Party" as it adds a 5th and 6th player. If we're able to get all of us to the table the 10yo doesn't have to be left out for Clank! - a game she's expressed a desire to play.

I think my 7yo grandson will be able to play Draftosaurus - and he's a huge dinosaur fan so if he "gets it" it'll be a double win. He's supposed to be at the house with his brother and sister in a week or so while grandma and I babysit while mom & dad move them into their new house.

"Architects of the West Kingom" is mostly for me. Since my closer grandkids haven't been coming around as much (their mom got a new boyfriend who lives ~4 hours away and they've been going there on weekends) I've made a point to purchase a few more games which have an automa so I can play solo. To further that goal I'm looking quite hard at "Teraforming Mars" and "Viticulture".
 
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jcroy

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(On a sad aside).

Recently I purged the rest of my old game collection. The remaining stuff was mostly really old wargames made by Avalon Hill or SPI from the 1970s (before they were gobbled up by larger companies like Hasbro, etc ...).



I came to the realization there was hardly anybody around anymore, who was still into old style wargames played over several weeks/months with chits on a map and dice.

The few folks locally who were still into such older style wargames, were rather unpleasant individuals who I actively stayed away from outside of gaming sessions (usually held at a nearby gaming/comic shop). Think of what Sheldon Cooper would be like at age 60, after a lifetime eating too many cheetos and constantly arguing over Star Wars and/or Star Trek trivia.
 
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LeoA

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I remember playing a board game in an economics class one day when going for my MBA. Something to do with businesses, power lines, etc. I'll have to figure out what game it was and hunt down a copy someday.

Probably was a stretch to incorporate it into the class, but I suspect the professor felt like giving everyone a break since the MBA program was an intense program that condensed everything into just two semesters. I recall it being fun, but most of the class whined for some reason.
 
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BobO'Link

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I've looked at Power Grid a few times but have always decided against it due to the complexity and "mathiness" that looks to be involved. I think it'd be quite a challenge for my daughter and the 10yo due to all the math involved. Not that they *wouldn't* get it but that they'd rather not have to and likely balk at playing for that reason. Frankly I don't know that my oldest grandson would go for it for the same reason. He's quite good at math (qualifies for AP math classes) but doesn't like it.
 

jcroy

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In my process of cleaning out my old games, I came across an old non-fiction book "War Games" by Thomas B. Allen.

It was about how chits and hex wargames similar to Avalon Hill and SPI type games from the 1970s, were used to research + simulate war scenarios by the department of defense. It also discusses the dark side of using highly mathematical wargames/simulations, like what was done when Robert MacNamara was defense secretary during the vietnam war era.
 

jcroy

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I remember playing a board game in an economics class one day when going for my MBA. Something to do with businesses, power lines, etc. I'll have to figure out what game it was and hunt down a copy someday.

Probably was a stretch to incorporate it into the class, but I suspect the professor felt like giving everyone a break since the MBA program was an intense program that condensed everything into just two semesters. I recall it being fun, but most of the class whined for some reason.
There was a book written about using wargames to analyze business/market type scenarios, by Herman & Frost.




 

BobO'Link

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My 17yo grandson talked me into playing Monopoly last night (he's been asking almost every day for a week). He got his 2 sisters (13 & 10) *and* grandma to play with us (I've mentioned before that almost the only games grandma will play are old Ameritrash games like Monopoly and Sorry, or classic card games and UNO).

A half hour or so after all the property had been purchased the 10yo (never played before and was excited at first to *finally* be playing Monopoly) said: "Can we start over? This isn't fun any more." adding that purchasing the property was fun but not anything after that. We explained how that's just the getting started part and the "real game" begins after it's all been purchased. She didn't like that answer but stayed in the game. She turned into a shrewd and quite stubborn trader.

After 2 hours grandma went bankrupt. The 10yo lasted 3 hours. At 4 hours, when we'd bankrupted the 13yo, I told my grandson: "That's it... I'm done... let's cash in and see who won." adding: "We're in nothing but a game of attrition which could go on for hours" to which grandma, who'd just walked back in, agreed. He talked me into 2 more dice rolls in which nothing changed and I insisted on a cash in. He won by the ~$400 I'd been stiffed on when the 13yo landed on a housed up property of mine and got the 10yo to roll while I was talking to grandma and not paying attention (the old "Hurry and roll the dice before they notice so I don't have to pay rent" ploy).

Yes - we played strictly by the "official" rules - no putting money in the middle of the board for a "Free Parking" bonus and following house/hotel rules appropriately - no paying the purchase price of the needed houses to get a hotel instead of actually owning them. My grandson and I got the first monopolies and pretty much locked down the houses, following the "don't purchase a hotel unless *you* need more houses on another of your properties and can afford to pay for it all in a single transaction/turn" adage.

I laughed when a utility came up for auction and I bid it up, bailing when it hit a bit over double the purchase price, sticking him with it. He said: "Ha! Got it from you!" to which I replied: "I didn't want it - I just bid it up to suck more money out of you!" He thought I'd want it since I owned the other one. I really don't like to own those as they're pretty worthless most of the time. I only purchase 1 of them if the opportunity arises to keep someone from getting the monopoly early on.

That game served to further convince me that I can go the rest of my life and never, ever, play another game of Monopoly.

In that 4 hours we could have played 2 or 3 "good" games. The only good things were the 10yo finally discovered how boring Monopoly is and grandma played a game with us for a couple of hours.
 

DaveF

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I've looked at Power Grid a few times but have always decided against it due to the complexity and "mathiness" that looks to be involved. I think it'd be quite a challenge for my daughter and the 10yo due to all the math involved. Not that they *wouldn't* get it but that they'd rather not have to and likely balk at playing for that reason. Frankly I don't know that my oldest grandson would go for it for the same reason. He's quite good at math (qualifies for AP math classes) but doesn't like it.
Power Grid is a great game. But its pretty mathy and has the most complex round transitions and poorly designed instruction manual explaining them, for the euro games I play.

So, maybe not for younger kids. But eventually, get it or one of its variants. :)
 
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