What Size Florescent (sp?)Light To Reduce Eye Strain?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by WilliamG, Dec 11, 2003.

  1. WilliamG

    WilliamG Supporting Actor

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    I've noticed lately that when viewing a movie on my Toshiba 50H81 with all lights out that I tend to get very tired and sleepy. So I did the research here and realized that I was straining my eyes when doing this. I want to go over to Wally World and get an inexpensive setup, but don't know what wattage I need for the bulb. Also, does it work better to somehow mount the tube fixture on the back of the set (don't want to if I don't have to), or can I lay the light down on the floor behind the TV and facing the wall?

    Thanks!
     
  2. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Is your set calibrated? If it is properly calibrated you shouldn't need any lighting, nor should you be getting much eye strain.

    REgardless, if you do want some soft backlighting, try to get a full spectrum bulb, or like a 6500 bulb if possible.
     
  3. WilliamG

    WilliamG Supporting Actor

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    Chris-
    No, not it's not calibrated yet ($$$ is a little scarce right now); and I don't have a *terrible* problem with it, but I DO wish to make viewing easier with all lights out. If you could please explain about "6500 bulb" I'd appreciate it. I'm assuming you're talking about Kelvins, but how is that determined? I'm only aware of wattage- is it closer to 15W, 40W or WHAT? [​IMG]
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Well, then your problem isn't lack of backlighting. Clearly you need to spend a few bucks (like $30?) to get Avia or VE, and calibrate your video. Most likely your contrast is up all the way, so your set is probably WAY WAY WAAAAAAY too bright. So the very bright set will fatigue your eyes. Calibrate first, and chance are you'll never need any backlighting. Or at least turn down the contrast in the interim. Easier on your eyes, AND on the TV.
     
  5. WilliamG

    WilliamG Supporting Actor

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    OK-
    Looks like a slight communication problem here.:b I do have the older version of VE; haven't found the new one yet at a b/m... anyway, when you asked about calibration, I'm thinking PROFESSIONAL calibration! Sorry. And to answer your questions about contrast, no, the contrast is waaaay down. The reason I brought this up in the first place is after we watched a movie last weekend with the lights out, I turned a table lamp on that's beside my wifes' recliner and noticed that my eyes immediately felt better. So that got me thinking about backlighting.
     
  6. Bill_Mis

    Bill_Mis Stunt Coordinator

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    Backlighting is an essential part of any display that is shown in a darkened room. It doesn't matter if your set is professionally calibrated or you use Avia or VE. The trick is to find a backlight that will be approximately 10% of the peak brightness that you encounter when watching movies. The bulb that closely replicates the 6500K standard is prefeered as well as a light rendering index of around 90 or so. I would guess a low wattage bulb like 20 watts should do the trick in an 18" fixture. I keep mine low to the ground behind the monitor so that it isn't too bright on the back wall. The trick is to get a nice even pattern so the light intensity is uniform and only about a tenth as bright as the display. Its the only way I watch tv in a darkened room and it helps alot.
     
  7. WilliamG

    WilliamG Supporting Actor

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    Bill_Mis-

    Thanks for the information [​IMG][​IMG] I'll head over and pick something up tonight. BTW, not to get off topic but as a short side note, do you know of any b/m store that carries the new Digital Video Essentials? I've checked Best Buy and our local Suncoast (where I normally find EVERYTHING that BB doesn't have) and they don't stock it there, either.
     
  8. Andy Goldstein

    Andy Goldstein Stunt Coordinator

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    i picked up a light fixture at wally world the other week. it has 2 10 watt halogen lamps in it, spaced about a foot apart. its an under-cabinet light. i mounted it on the sloping back panel of the rptv with foam tape. it has a 2-level switch. works fine!

    ag.
     
  9. WilliamG

    WilliamG Supporting Actor

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    Andy,
    Sounds great! I was just about to head out when I decided to check the forum posts again and saw yours. I saw that same one last night while looking. Glad it works for you. That just may be the one. I appreciate it.[​IMG]
     
  10. Tim K

    Tim K Second Unit

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  11. Tim K

    Tim K Second Unit

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    Here is a quote from CinemaQuest inc., the makers of the IdealLume backlight. I was a little off on my "pupil explanation" but I knew it was something like that.

    "A small fluorescent fixture, with a proper 'color temperature' bulb, placed behind a direct-view monitor or rear-projection set, fulfills much of what is needed to achieve the SMPTE standards pertaining to ambient light in the room. Viewing a TV in a darkened room can cause eye strain in short order. This is primarily due to the iris opening and closing dramatically as scenes change from dark to light on the screen. For a vivid demonstration of how frequently light levels change throughout a typical program, turn your back to a TV in a darkened room and notice how much the light changes in the room, both in intensity and frequency. Providing a small amount of light behind the set 'biases' the iris (reducing the range of motion in the iris muscle), resulting in more relaxed viewing."
     

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