What screen technology, DLP, LCD, Plasma, etc., HDTV in is better for video games?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by orestes, Jul 22, 2006.

  1. orestes

    orestes Second Unit

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    What screen technology, DLP, LCD, Plasma, etc., HDTV in is better to play console video games? BTW, I am only interested in 40-42" screen size.

    Thanks
    orestes
    P.S. I will leave for Tokyo, Japan on July 31st and arrive in Tokyo on August 1st. I hope to see some new technology in acton!
     
  2. orestes

    orestes Second Unit

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    Well I guess nobody is sure if these new technologies are any good for console video game!

    orestes
     
  3. Zack Gibbs

    Zack Gibbs Screenwriter

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    For that size I'd only go with a direct view LCD screen. All the others will have burn issues.
     
  4. Phil Iturralde

    Phil Iturralde Screenwriter

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    No burn issues w/DLPs.

    orestes, I don't play games so I can't answer your question. So, if you can, audition the sets on your list using your game console. Look for lag, pixelation, breakup, streaking / trailing (motion artifacts) and ghosting.

    Phil
     
  5. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    No burn in issues with LCD rear projection or LCoS, for that matter.
     
  6. Christopher Cheadle

    Christopher Cheadle Stunt Coordinator

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    I play console games (Xbox360) on a Samsung HL-S5086W (DLP) and it is virtually flawless. I haven't noticed any lag or pixel breakup at all. I am using a VGA cable from the 360 to the Sammy with the console outputting 1280x720 (never have had to use the game mode).
     
  7. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Some LCDs can be slow, which can be an issue with video games.
     
  8. Gregg Loewen

    Gregg Loewen Video Standards Instructor, THX Ltd.
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    hi guys
    I can confirm that LCOS can have burn in. I saw it on a Sony unit that had been running a Sony HD demo loop at a local retailer.
     
  9. Christopher Cheadle

    Christopher Cheadle Stunt Coordinator

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    Yikes...good to know. I am within the 30 day return window on the Sammy and had toyed with the idea after the first couple of weeks of returning it for an LCoS unit just to see which one I liked better. I am now right at about a month and am loving the quality of the DLP unit even more than when I first bought it. And, knowing this potential problem with the LCoS sets, I am extra glad I stuck with the Sammy. [​IMG]

    For purposes of this thread, I took my 360 over to my parents' house last night and hooked it up to their 60" Sony LCoS to see how well it performed. With the console set to 1080i (figured this was the best setting with the least amount of conversion of the signal for the 1080P set) and I did notice a bit of lag between the controller and action on the screen. It wasn't horrible, but just enough to be annoying.
     
  10. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Not to contradict Gregg, who is clearly The Man when it comes to calibration, but both Sony and JVC state in their manuals that portions of the screen that stay static for extended periods of time can retain an image on their LCoS sets, but that this will quickly fade when other program material is displayed.

    In other words the pixels will take longer to return to a neutral state but they will not literally "burn in" the way phosphors will. Hence no permanent burn in. I can see where a set running a demo loop would appear to exhibit the problem, but even after running that loop for days at a time I'd be very surprised if the screen didn't return to normal after at most a couple of hours of running regular programming. Real burn-in does not heal itself this way, and if you don't plan on running static images on your TV for days at a time, I don't see how you'd get into this situation in the first place.

    I've had my HD-ILA since last November and have never seen a hint of a problem. Of course I don't leave it sitting on a test pattern for days at a stretch, either. (Actually, I couldn't, since both my DVD players have screen savers. [​IMG])

    I would not consider a fear of burn in a reason for avoiding LCoS as I might with plasma or CRT. If Gregg or anyone else has information to the contrary, I'm prepared to be educated, but I don't see this as being a problem and I love my JVC LCoS.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  11. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Indeed, LCOS has probably the same chance of burn in as an LCD, which is not much at all unless you are using it for a fixed image for along long long time.

    More temporary image retention happens, but is not permanent.
     
  12. Gregg Loewen

    Gregg Loewen Video Standards Instructor, THX Ltd.
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    long term static image became PERMANENT BURN IN....this is pretty much a theoretical thing in real world viewing.
     
  13. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    Question is ... how long to reverse image retention? 1 day ... 1 week ... 1 month ... 1 year? What is reasonable? What is not?

    Can we be comfortable if retention lasted one year ...?

    REgards
     
  14. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    From what little I've read on the subject, which doesn't come up a lot because it happens so infrequently, we're talking minutes or hours, not days or months. And first you have to have a static image on your screen long enough to produce the problem in the first place. My freeze frame on my DVR stops after 1/2 a hour. The screen saver on my DVD players all kick in after about 5 minutes on a paused image, disc menu or player menu. So I've never seen image retention on my LCD flat panel (which I bought last September) or my LCoS RPTV. If I did ever see it, I suspect the time needed to clear the problem would be no greater than the time that it took to cause it, and probably substantially less because - again - we're not talking about phosphors.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  15. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Just for temporary retention, it's probably on the order of minutes at the extreme, and less if you're playing moving content to get rid of it. Computer lab LCDs that are running a desktop basically 24/7 will show some retention that dissipates fairly quickly with just a blank image. I think the fear people have is more burn-in realated with regards to playing video games with fixed GUI, or burning in an aspect ratio, and in those cases I would consider LCD/LCOS pretty much immune for any reasonable use.

    As for permanent burn-in, again I think like gregg seems to be insinuating, it has to be a fixed image for a LONG long time (say airport flight monitors or something that just have the same thing for days and days and days). My point would be that except for people who are buying displays for commercial purposes, a home user shouldn't be worried about burn-in on an LCD display. And even for those somewhat abusive commercial uses, LCD is probably still the clear choice over something like Plasma or anything else phosphor based which certainly WILL burn-in quite severely over a long time in that kind of an abusive use.
     
  16. Joe Szott

    Joe Szott Screenwriter

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    As far as looks go man, I like plasma the best. You do have to make sure you aren't in "torch" mode, but the calrity, angle of viewing, and color depth is hard to beat for video games.

    I've played on older RPTV, LCD, CRT, DLP, and plasma at different times. I liked the plasma the best, but of course this could just be personal preference (I did buy one for this purpose.) They all look darn good though, no loser technologies in the modern batch of HDTVs.
     

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