What is the name of the zany theme music from Wilder's ONE, TWO THREE?

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Ronald Epstein, Oct 1, 2003.

  1. Ronald Epstein

    Ronald Epstein Administrator
    Owner

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 1997
    Messages:
    46,993
    Likes Received:
    4,686
    Real Name:
    Ronald Epstein
    I collect instrumental music -- mostly "pop" stuff
    from the likes of Bob Crewe, Herb Alpert, Bert
    Kaempfert, Henry Mancini, etc.

    You get the picture.

    Been a particular instrumental I have been searching
    fyears for. It wasn't until I viewed One, Two,
    Three
    today that I heard it. It's the zany
    theme music that plays during the title credits and
    then during every chase scene in the film.

    I think it's called Firehouse something
    or another. Not sure.

    Anyway, if anyone has the title and/or artist
    I'd appreciate knowing.

    Regards
     
  2. Agee Bassett

    Agee Bassett Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Messages:
    922
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sabre Dance by Aram Khachaturian.
     
  3. Peter Apruzzese

    Peter Apruzzese Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 1999
    Messages:
    3,363
    Likes Received:
    896
    Real Name:
    Peter Apruzzese
    Agee is correct. It's also used - to great effect - in The Hudsucker Proxy during the Hula-Hoop montage sequence.
     
  4. Ronald Epstein

    Ronald Epstein Administrator
    Owner

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 1997
    Messages:
    46,993
    Likes Received:
    4,686
    Real Name:
    Ronald Epstein
    You guys are great!

    You won't believe this, but I own it on CD!

    Now that I have the title, I did a search of
    my CD database and found it in a DANCE collection
    that I haven't even taken the shrinkwrap off of.

    Quite amazing!

    Thanks gents!
     
  5. Eric Peterson

    Eric Peterson Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2001
    Messages:
    2,959
    Likes Received:
    1
    Ron,

    What did you think of "One, Two, Three"?

    Personally, it's one of my top ten comedies of all-time along with "Blazing Saddles", "Young Frankenstein", "Airplane", "Some Like It Hot", & "The Big Lebowski".
     
  6. Peter Kline

    Peter Kline Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 1999
    Messages:
    2,393
    Likes Received:
    0
    The film is exhausting in a good way! [​IMG]
     
  7. Ronald Epstein

    Ronald Epstein Administrator
    Owner

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 1997
    Messages:
    46,993
    Likes Received:
    4,686
    Real Name:
    Ronald Epstein
    Excellent film! Lively dialogue and some
    very funny slapstick. Never pictured James
    Cagney in a role like this.

    It was given to me by Robert Crawford who has
    been regularly advising me on what classic films
    I need to be purchasing.

    The man hasn't been wrong yet.
     
  8. Mark Zimmer

    Mark Zimmer Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1997
    Messages:
    4,300
    Likes Received:
    40
    Sabre Dance, by the way, is from the ballet Gayane (sometimes written Gayne) by Aram Khatchaturian. A particularly beautiful and haunting segment of this ballet is used to excellent effect during the Discovery sequences of 2001: A Space Odyssey. The entire ballet is wonderful, and I advise it to anyone seeking something new and interesting for their classical music collection.
     
  9. Ashley Seymour

    Ashley Seymour Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2000
    Messages:
    938
    Likes Received:
    0
    Have to agree with Ron, Eric, etc. that this is one of my favorite comedies.

    When slapstick works, as it does well in ONE, TWO, THREE it has a major element of satire. It pokes fun at our human vanity and self interest while bringing the characters together in their embrace and recognition of their common needs.

    Dr. Strangelove used the heavy handed version of satire to scare us with the realization that no plan or system could be put in place to foil the ability of humans to foul up any system.

    One, Two, Three implies that even diverse cultures such as post war American, Russian, and German still are based on the same basic human motives.

    Coneheads did a similar, though in a less frenetic way, when it poked fun at our preoccupation and self interest and missed seeing our value systems is the element that other - alien - cultures ultimately choose to emulate.
     

Share This Page