What is Cinema Re-EQ and do I need it?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Eric F, Aug 23, 2002.

  1. Eric F

    Eric F Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,810
    Likes Received:
    0
    My JVC TX-DS595 offers a Cinema Re-EQ function, and I was wondering just what it does. The manual gives a brief explanation saying it's a feature for films to be less harsh in the home environment, but since DVDs are made for home use anyways, what's the point?

    Could anyone give a better explanation, and some input on what material I would use it on? For material produced for a home environment like TV shows (ie:Next Generation) would I even need it?
     
  2. Joe Tilley

    Joe Tilley Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2002
    Messages:
    686
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know there have been post here before about the same question. If you do a search here you should be able to find it. There was quite a bit of information about it when I saw it.
     
  3. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2
    Re-equalization is a originally a THX feature, but it's been incorporated in many non-THX receivers and processors. The short description from THX's website is:

     
  4. GordonL

    GordonL Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2000
    Messages:
    771
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  5. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2
     
  6. GordonL

    GordonL Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2000
    Messages:
    771
    Likes Received:
    0
    Se7en is produced by New Line who had Mi Casa do their mixes. In fact, the majority of Mi Casa's work is for New Line. I also found the reference to the Sony facility at The Digital Bits, so it would seem DVDs released by Columbia/TriStar/Sony would have the near-field mixes also. But what about Warner, Paramount, Fox, Universal, Disney, HBO, Artisan, etc? Do they do near-field mixes?
     
  7. Bill Slack

    Bill Slack Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 1999
    Messages:
    837
    Likes Received:
    0
    A lot of mixes are. I don't know of any set way to tell, but on many titles it is very easy to tell that Re-Eq over compensates and makes it sound worse. I just play it by ear...

    For DPL sources, I almost always use it. My receiver pre-dates DPLII by a few years, so THX and Re-Eq were bigger features to me then, then it is now.

    Overall, I think it's a nice feature to have, since some soundtracks are obviously too bright for a smaller listen enviroment, and have not been altered on DVD, but it's not a feature you should pay too much extra for, alone.
     
  8. Eric F

    Eric F Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,810
    Likes Received:
    0
    So I guess the general consensus is to leave it off?

    I brought up the question of TV shows. Many of them are now either produced or remixed to DD 5.1, but are not broadcast that way. I'm really curious as to the ones being produced for 5.1 are being mixed for a home theater environment or theater?

    I do have an HDTV, and for the few HD OTA shows that are in DD (ABC) they seem oddly mixed. I'm not sure what to make of it, especially the sitcoms, which the 5.1 surround mixes are usually poor. NYPD Blue is the only one that seems to have an excellent mix.
     
  9. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2
     
  10. Bill Slack

    Bill Slack Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 1999
    Messages:
    837
    Likes Received:
    0
    I usually leave it on. A lot of mixes aren't re-done too much for the home, or are still fairly bright and forward sounding. I have a small room and Klipsch speakers, so it really helps.

    Sometimse though, the sound is obviously to rolled off, and I kick it out of THX (with cinema re-eq) mode. Dark City for instance, in the DD track (I used to own the DTS LD too) sounds really rolled off. It seems to be too much to a degree without re-eq, but sounds horrible with re-eq engaged.
     
  11. steve nn

    steve nn Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2002
    Messages:
    2,418
    Likes Received:
    0
    C-EQ will generally add a more warmer sound and enhance bass. When I listen at higher levels I might turn it off and at lower levels I might leave it on. It depends on how much bass is mixed in to the sound-track too. I like having it and having the option. Try it on and off on each movie you watch. You most likely will like it on or off on different't movies.
     

Share This Page