What is a sindicated show? How does the industry work?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Andre Barros, Dec 21, 2003.

  1. Andre Barros

    Andre Barros Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, being that English is my second language I have never understood what a sindicated show is. Probably because I do not live in the US I also don't have a knowledge of how the TV game works over there so here is my question. What is a sindicated show? Why do people always mention that a show is sindicated, what is the advantage/difference between that a a non-sindicated show (if there is such a thing)? Are there any successful shows on American TV that are non-sindicated, or is that like a requirement or something? Thank you in advance.

    Regards,

    André
     
  2. Steve_Tk

    Steve_Tk Cinematographer

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    I don't really know either. But I know that Seinfeld and Friends are syndicated now, and I think that means the rights to play them have been sold and are shown as reruns on another station. Plus the actors still make money off the reruns, but I'm just guessing so I could be 100% wrong.
     
  3. Jason GT

    Jason GT Second Unit

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    Syndication is a distribution method. I don't work in the broadcast industry so my terminology may be incorrect, but this is my understanding of things:

    Take a TV show, say ... The Simpsons. Waaaay back when, Fox procured the rights to broadcast The Simpsons. Distribution (broadcasting) is controlled solely by Fox. Eventually there is a fair size library (say 3-4 seasons of episodes), enough for ... syndication. If your original series is still going, the rights holder still has exclusive broadcast rights over new episodes, but broadcast rights over the old episodes/reruns can be purchased by any station.

    For series that have ended, syndication can ensure a long lifetime on TV (Seinfeld, Cheers are examples of shows that are long gone but still can be caught in syndication)

    Alternatively, you have some shows which are NOT originally distributed via the network method. Some shows are distributed straight from syndication (Star Trek, The Next Generation was a notable example).

    Syndication is not usually a requirement for success but tends to ensure the longevity of a series. Usually a network-to-syndication transition means that the television series has been relatively successful (such that independent stations would WANT to rebroadcast reruns).
     

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