What is a "HSP" modem? Does it have any drawbacks?

Kevin Alexander

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I have a 56K HSP modem. I found out that HSP means "Host Shared Processor". Does this mean that it taxes the CPU when it is operating? Is a standalone modem, or non-HSP modem better to access the internet with?
 

brentl

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You got it Pontiac

It uses computer cycles to operate.
Really with todays processors it doensn't really matter. Most people won't pay$70+ for a hardware based modem when you can get a soft modem for $20
Brent L
 

Rob Gillespie

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They're often called "winmodems" and they have a big drawback - they only work in Windows. Install Linux and it's practically impossible to get most of them to work.
 

Kimmo Jaskari

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Winmodems also have their good and bad versions. A modem like yours called HSP 56 is most likely based on the Connexant chipset... those gave us the hardest time when I was still working ISP tech support.
Lucent Winmodems are very good though, even when comparing them to "real" hardware modems. But of course, the problems with any-os-other-than-windows remain.
But of course, if you get decent connect speeds and a stable connection then your modem is fine for you. If not, look at upgrading the software drivers for it first of all (in this case, the software drivers basically are the modem).
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/Kimmo
[Edited last by Kimmo Jaskari on August 24, 2001 at 04:14 PM]
 

Chris

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As someone who directs IT at our facility, and someone who ran (and still owns interest in) a few ISPs, let me give you a heads up:
Lucent Winmodems (seen in your device manager as LT WinModem) are the most expandable and use the least CPU time.
Connexant (aka Rockwell) are some of the worst; using immense CPU time to get off the ground, and in the initial negotiation phase that can really kill you as to your hookup rate..
Cirrus Logic, another manufacturer of WinModem chipsets is basically in the middle; there are a few others out there, but these are the "prime" dogs.
Just realize what you're getting: all WinModems require basically a 300Mhz processor at minimum to even start. They require (really) a 500Mhz processor to really keep a solid connection; and if you're using Connexant, it requires at least 5MB free on your C: in order to create it's mirror files that it uses as it connects.
Good luck no matter which one you chose.
 

Brian Harnish

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Just a question...why would anyone even GET an HSP modem if it taxes CPU resources so much? I'm not attacking the starter (Kevin) of this thread at all. I'm just rather curious as to why someone wouldn't just get a regular internal 56K modem.

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- Brian
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Chris

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Realize, even though HSP is a brand (in general) it's PCI, and it's cheap.
With almost no exceptions, PCI modems (in general) are CPU driven. The only way to guarantee you have a non-CPU driven modem at this point in time is to go External (and even then, their are external CPU driven modems, like all USB modems) or ISA.
And most newer MB's have no ISA slots (good riddance!)
CW
 

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