What, exactly, is scaling and will I need it?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by James Zos, Oct 16, 2002.

  1. James Zos

    James Zos Supporting Actor

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    Sorry for the newbie question, but I am slowly, painfully inching towards the purchase of my first front projector (going from a lowly 27-inch analog Panasonic) and as such I am going to need to buy a new progressive DVD player to replace my old non-prog one.
    I have seen references to players that scale the picture. What is this feature exactly and will I need it for a native 16:9 front projector (AE200)?
     
  2. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Players that "scale" the picture aka progressive scan DVD players "double" in simple terms, the number of visible lines of resolution. Your projector will also do the same thing. The pj I am using can accept regular interlaced DVD video (480i) via one set of component inputs. In this case, the projector will do the "doubling", OR, it can accept progressive scan DVD video (480p) via another set of component inputs. In this case, the projector will not do the "doubling" but the DVD player will.

    There is another thread in this section that indicates the Panasonic DVD-RP62 is a good progressive DVD player that does not have the chroma bug so this would be a good candidate for you if you decided to get such a player. Often, the progressive scan output is better than if the projector did the doubling because there are less steps in creating the end product.
     
  3. James Zos

    James Zos Supporting Actor

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    Thanks for the informative response Neil!
    Was this site down for a while? I couldn't get it to come up.
     
  4. Luis C

    Luis C Stunt Coordinator

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    Neil,
    Scaling and line doubling are two completely different things... [​IMG]
    Scaling is where the picture is "re-sized" by interpolation to match a specific resolution irrespective of its original resolution. This is best for plasma or projectors where a 480i or 480p image may not match the native resolution of the display unit (which it normally is not).
    Line doubling is exactly as it states... the image is decompiled from its interlaced format, de-interlaced and then recompiled to a progressive scan (non-interlaced) format. This is good for when you have various interlaced media (ala NTSC broadcasts, VHS tapes, Y,Cb,Cr DVD output) and want to improve the image quality by having it converted to a higher quality non-interlaced media.
    Getting a really good outboard unit of this type will easily outperform any of the current on-board processors available in DVD players and displays. And most good line doublers (ala the upcoming Iscan Ultra) now come with "chroma filters" that reduce or eliminate the far too prevalent MPEG-2 chroma bug.
     
  5. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Yes. If you take a visit to the computers/HTPC area, you will find posts that deal with this very thing. Seems like the computer is the cheapest/best way to scale an image these days. The results usually blow away "doublers" (as I call them) in current DVD players & displays as you mentioned.
     
  6. James Zos

    James Zos Supporting Actor

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    So Luis, what is a good (affordable) outboard line doubler?
     
  7. Luis C

    Luis C Stunt Coordinator

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    Depends... how many inputs (and what type) do you need? That will affect the cost some...
     

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