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What does this mean? (1 Viewer)

David Preston

Supporting Actor
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Mar 23, 2003
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What exactly does db sensitivity mean? My front speakers are cerwin-vega vs 120 rated at 97db sen my rears are cerwin-vega E-208's rated at 92db and my cv sub is 50-150HZ @18db/octive can someone break this down where I can understand it. I also have my subs freq turned all the way down to 40. 80 is half way 120 is all the way is ok. Thanks.
 

Brett DiMichele

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David,

Forget the sub in this discussion because what you listed
for the sub was the crossover slope not it's sensitivity.

Sensitivity is as the word implies, how sensitive a speaker
or speaker system is.

Sensitivity is measured with a standardized system of 1 Watt
(2.83 Volts) at 1 Meter of Distance.

For example if the nomenclature is factual for any speaker
then it goes like this..Your CV VS120's will produce 97
Decibels of sound at 1 Meter when you supply them with 1
watt of power.

"Sensitive" speakers are anything in the 90Db @ 1Watt 1Meter
range. Low Sensitivity speakers are anything in the 80-89
range generaly.

So what does this all mean? It means that the more sensitive
the speaker is that you use, the less amplifier power you
will need to drive it to the same sound pressure levels as
a not so sensitive speaker.

Make sense?
 

Brett DiMichele

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Brett
David,

As for your subwoofer.. You need to set the Crossover to
the same point as your Reciever Crosses your mains if you
are running them as "Small". In other words if you have your
Receiver set to "Small" on the Left and Right Front Channels
and the Reciever uses the standard 80Hz Crossover then you
also need to set the Subwoofer's Crossover to 80Hz.

Then you need to get a RadioShack Analog SPL meter and
Avia or Video Essentials and do a through calibration of
all the channels. Worst case scenario at least use the
internal test tones to set the levels of all the speakers
the same.
 

Lee Carbray

Second Unit
Joined
Oct 23, 2002
Messages
308
I would disagree with the crossover suggestion. Having two crossovers doing the same thing is not good. It is best to disable the crossover in the sub(if possible), or move it to the highest position effectively taking it out the way. Turn it up to 120.
 

David Preston

Supporting Actor
Joined
Mar 23, 2003
Messages
698
Won't it make the bass sound funny if I turn it up to 120. I can't test till later every one is asleep now. What does it mess up with the crossover on 80. So in other words my speakers don't take much to push them so my receiver will be fine correct. Thanks I learn something new every day.
 

Brett DiMichele

Senior HTF Member
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Brett
David,

Basicaly what Lee is suggesting is that Cascading Crossovers
are bad.. (I don't agree, but that's neither here nor there)

When you set your main speakers to "Small" in the Receivers
setup then it will cross them over at a certain frequency
(EG: 80Hz) anything below will be sent out to the sub woofer
and therfore you "can" set the Sub EQ higher (EG:120Hz)since
there is only a 80Hz signal being output to the sub in the
first place.

Yep efficient speakers generaly don't take much power to
drive to decent listening levels. There are exceptions as
always. For example they may be efficient speakers but the
woofers may have low impedance dips that could cause a typical
Receiver to go into Thermal Protection mode. But if you run
the mains as small this becomes a moote point since you won't
be running the woofers down low enough to dip the impedance
of the woofer.
 

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