what does "mint condition" mean to you?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Ted Lee, Mar 25, 2005.

  1. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    hi all -

    help me settle a debate between me and wifey! [​IMG]

    i say "mint" condition means the item is just like new. in other words, if i handed it to you, you would not be able to tell i just took it out of the box. no scratches, dings, scuff marks, etc. however, it has been used in day-to-day activities.

    she says "mint" condition means brand-spankin' new, never been used, etc. in other words, no human hands have ever touched or operated the thing.

    so...who is right?

    [​IMG]

    vote for ted!
     
  2. Rob Gardiner

    Rob Gardiner Cinematographer

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    You can read a comic book and if you are very careful, it will still be in mint condition. Therefore, Sugartastic wins the fruit cup for today. [​IMG]
     
  3. Kevin Alexander

    Kevin Alexander Screenwriter

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    Once again Ted, you're right and your wife is WRONG.[​IMG]
     
  4. Henry Gale

    Henry Gale Producer

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    Ted,
    Your wife is always correct, even when she may not be.
    This time however I happen to agree with her definition. A "mint" coin for instance, has NOT been in "day-to-day" use.
     
  5. RichardK

    RichardK Second Unit

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    Mint condition to me is never used, could be taken out of the box if it can be placed back in the box without any difference to the look or performance to the unit, if the packaging has remained pristinely intact that also helps. Your definition is more of a 'like new' condition and to me works just as good as mint but costs less!

    out of the box example...I bought my PSP and opened the box with only the slightest hint that the tape seal had been lifted. I took the PSP out of the container, inspected it and put it back just the same as if it had not ever been opened. If i wanted to sell it, i would sell it in mint condition. couldnt say never opened cuz that would be lying [​IMG] . If i would have turned it on, watched the start up screen, said this sucks, and then turned it back off, boxed it up oh so carefully, and tried to sell it...i'd have to say it was 'like new', if i said mint condition, that would be lying IMO. YMMV.
     
  6. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    I agree with you Ted, mint is as new. new would be, well new or new in box.
    I don't think either is right. it's like asking "how many is several?"

    also, the dictionary isn't much help

    I suppose "as if new" would mean not new, but just like it was, in my mind anyway. (6th edit of the afternoon)
     
  7. Jason Kirkpatri

    Jason Kirkpatri Second Unit

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    There is no debate; "new" is used to describe a new item and "mint" is to described a used item.

    The truth at last!
     
  8. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Since "mint condition" is used exclusively to describe items that have, in fact, been used, it should be obvious who is right. (As noted above, we already have a perfectly good word for new, unused, items - "new".) [​IMG]

    Take a look at eBay or Amazon or the newspaper classifieds. New, unopened, items are invariably described as "new, unopened." Used items in "like new, you'd never know the difference" condition are "mint".

    Joe
     
  9. Dennis Nicholls

    Dennis Nicholls Lead Actor

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    "Mint condition" means it's like a coin newly struck from the mint. In other words, no wear from day to day use. Even light handling of a coin will cause surface oxidation and fingerprints, so it's not really mint condition unless you handle it with gloves. So I would expect the same about other kinds of items labled as "mint".

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Jason Adams

    Jason Adams Supporting Actor

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    Roger Jason Adams
    Mint Condition means, not exactly new, but in like new condition. If she doesn't change her stance, then divorce the silly broad. [​IMG]
     
  11. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    ha! the tally (so far)

    ted: 6
    wifey: 2
    ?: 1

    so far 3:1 ratio ... i'll take that to the bank! [​IMG]
     
  12. Patrick_S

    Patrick_S Producer

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    and if you are not careful, to the couch tonight.
     
  13. BrianW

    BrianW Cinematographer

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    Add me to the Ted-O-Rooney column. (If only I had a nickel for every time I've said that...)

    Mint means indistinguishable from new (or very close to it), even though it is not new.

    Your wife's definition of "mint" is the definition of "new." Why even have different words if they mean the same thing?
     
  14. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    You are right.

    The Wife is wrong.


    Women have 17 different words all describing the color "white," so why not?
     
  15. Bob Graz

    Bob Graz Supporting Actor

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    Mint condition is used but like new. Now Ted, do you want to be right or be "lonely".
     
  16. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    lol...point well taken my friends.

    i'd rather be wrong, not sleeping on the couch...or lonely!

    as my friend often tells me, "pick your battles ted...pick your battles!"
     
  17. ShelbyB

    ShelbyB Stunt Coordinator

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    Mint condition means that the item of subject is in the same condition as the day it left the mint. This includes baseball cards, stamps, coins, dollar bills, ANYTHING THAT CAN BE MINTED.

    Speakers cannot be minted. Nor can headphones. Cars, houses, clothes, and electronics CANNOT BE MINTED.

    Sorry, but this is my pet peeve. For non-minted items, use the word 'perfect' or 'flawless' or (gasp) 'new and unopened.'
     
  18. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    The term comes (very obviously) from coins that appear as though they have just come from the mint. That is they cannot show wear. They may have been used. The term that numismatists use to describe coins that have never been used is uncirculated.

    This minor (but important if you collect coins, which I don’t) distinction clearly points out that mint condition does not mean new or never used, only that it has that appearance.

    Regardless I go along with Henry—your wife is right, even though she might not technically be correct on this one.
     
  19. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Er, ever hear of words like "metaphor", "simile", "comparison", Capt. Literal? If we took your "pet peeve" to its logical conclusion we wouldn't have colorful terms to describe women like Pamela Anderson, trapped by the fact that human females clearly aren't made of brick. [​IMG]

    Doubtless the original term was "near mint" condition for coins that are circulated, but which show no sign of wear, and in that form was transferred by an obvious process to things which are not minted. (And, by the way, baseball cards, comic books and even paper money are not "minted" - that is, they are not stamped out of metal. That's why the U.S. Mint produces coins, while the Bureau of Engraving and Printing produces the paper money. So you're not even being consistent. Comic books are no more minted than sports cars are.)

    After constant usage "near mint" was worn down to "mint", the "near" being understood. (Well, by most people. [​IMG])

    To insist that the modern term adhere literally to its origins is just silly. Do you also yell at people who speak of "dialing" a phone? "Cutting" a record? I guess we can't talk about watching "films" in our home theaters, since few if any of us have film projectors in them and are really watching them on discs...

    Later,

    Joe
     

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