What Do I Have Here

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by WyattR, Sep 28, 2005.

  1. WyattR

    WyattR Auditioning

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    Thanks for this incredible exchange of information on this forum and the knowledge you folks give to those like me. This is my first post, so please go easy! I'm just starting to put together a sound system for my 22'x22' studio condo from scratch and need help. Thanks to reviews I ordered JBL E 80's for my fronts yesterday from B&H (you folks are going to cost me lots of money)and need help with the rest. My brother gave me a Onkyo TX-SV515PRO "Audio Video Control Tuner Amplifier" and I would like to use it if possible. Being new, is this a complete amp, tuner and receiver and how will it compare to seperate components. Don't even know if it will work and how old she is. Many more questions, but I shall keep a few for later.

    Thanks You,
    Wyatt
     
  2. John S

    John S Producer

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    That AVR is old, Pro-Logic only. No subwoofer output.

    Maybe Ok for stereo/2 channel stuff, but for modern HT it is a dog.


    You want an AVR with DD 5.1 at a minimum really.
     
  3. WyattR

    WyattR Auditioning

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    Thanks John for that info. Is a newer version of what I have as good as just buying a stand a lone tuner/receiver and amp? And what exactly is the difference between a receiver and a tuner? I would like to keep the whole system to $1500 (including speakers, amp and sub.) How about recommendations for my budget.

    Thanks again,
    Wyatt
     
  4. Tim Hoover

    Tim Hoover Screenwriter

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    A tuner is just that - it tunes in radio stations...

    An integrated amp includes a preamp and amplifier sections. The preamp will allow you to switch among various sources, which are then amplified through the amp portion and sent to your speakers...

    A receiver is basically an integrated amp coupled with a built-in tuner. It will allow you to select sources, tune in radio stations, and amplify the signal to send to your speakers. Please note that you will not need a separate amplifier with a receiver or integrated amp...
     
  5. John S

    John S Producer

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    Not just as good, but just as good in that price range.

    For an impressive start to a system, I like the Yamaha 5890 AVR, and the Velodyne DLS5000R sub, paired with like 3 pair of JBL E30 speakers for full 6.1.......


    A reciever generally referred to as an AVR these days, generally consists of Dolby and DTS decoders, has integrated power amps, a slew of digital and analog audio inputs, and even video inputs and outputs for routing video to your display along with audio to the AVR. The reciever lable has stuck because back in stereo days these always included AM/FM tuners as well.


    In todays world a tuner often means an HDTV tuner, not an AM/FM tuner as is still included with modern AVR's.


    In the modern world, you no longer by a tuner and an amp, you buy a Pre/Pro (pre-amp / Processor) and an amp or amps to provide power for your speakers.

    I'm not even sure the last time I came across a stand alone AM/FM tuner, but I am sure somebody still makes them.
     

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