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What did you watch this week in classic TV on DVD(or Blu)? (10 Viewers)

The 1960's

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The Twilight Zone (1959-1964) (BluRay Photo Essay #4)

S05E17 Number 12 Looks Just Like You (Jan.24.1964)



In a future society, everyone must undergo an operation at age 19 to become beautiful and conform to society. One young woman desperately wants to hold onto her own identity. (IMDb)

I think of this episode as somewhat of a sequel to Eye of the Beholder as both speak about the morality of human appearance and that individuality is an attribute that must never be forgotten. Many years ago an old girlfriend said something which has stuck with me to this very day. It was in regards to another woman who was particularly unattractive making a speech before a large gathering. “You should have seen how confident she sounded considering her appearance” she said. I responded, “what an odd comment. You’re saying because she happens to be extremely unattractive she hasn’t the right to be speaking with authority about the business she’s in?” Fact: She was very much in love with herself.

Number 12 Looks Just Like You was suggested as a photo essay by Alan aka Purple Wig. His yearning for tasty cheesecake is evident. (Note the same hallway set was used for both Eye of the Beholder and this one.)

Rod Serling’s Opening Narration:

Given the chance, what young girl wouldn't happily exchange a plain face for a lovely one? What girl could refuse the opportunity to be beautiful? For want of a better estimate, let's call it the year 2000. At any rate, imagine a time in the future where science has developed the means of giving everyone the face and body he dreams of. It may not happen tomorrow, but it happens now in the Twilight Zone.

Cast:

Marilyn Cuberle Collin Wilcox Paxton
Uncle Rick / Dr. Rex / Professor Sigmund Friend / Tom Richard Long
Valerie / Marilyn Pamela Austin
Lana Cuberle / Grace / Eva / Doe / Jane / #12 Suzy Parker
Narrator / Self - Host Rod Serling

Crew:

Writing Credits Charles Beaumont John Tomerlin
Created Rod Serling
Produced by William Froug
Cinematography by Charles F. Wheeler
Film Editing by Thomas Scott
Casting By Patricia Mock
Art Direction by Malcolm Brown George W. Davis
Set Decoration by Robert R. Benton Henry Grace

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The 1960's

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Rod Serling’s Closing Narration:

Portrait of a young lady in love - with herself. Improbable? Perhaps. But in an age of plastic surgery, body building and an infinity of cosmetics, let us hesitate to say impossible. These, and other strange blessings, may be waiting in the future, which, after all, is the Twilight Zone.


 

Jeff Flugel

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Mr. Lucky – 1.31 “Stacked Deck”.
Mr. Lucky (John Vivyan) and his pal Andamo (Ross Martin) must contend with rich young blonde runaway, Margot (Yvette Mimieux), who has stowed away on their yacht-turned-floating restaurant, The Fortuna. The blonde is not the worst of their problems, though, as a Beatnik serial killer (Grant Williams, unrecognizable as the same guy from The Incredible Shrinking Man) is also on board, and determined to make Margot his next victim. The killer seems small fry compared to some of the hard cases Lucky and Andamo have taken out in past episodes, but the story rachets up some decent suspense…and this time it’s Andamo who ends up with the buxom Ms. Mimieux in his arms, not Lucky (Ross Martin, you old lady killer, you...)

There's some nicely noirish lighting on display here, as well as several clever camera setups, courtesy of veteran feature film director Jack Arnold (including a scene with a gun-toting Williams in the foreground and a pensive Vivyan reflected in a background mirror.) Needless to say, Yvette Mimieux, just a hair over 18 years old here, looks sensational. I’ve always considered Mimieux and Carol Lynley as similar types: both petite, stacked blondes, both fine actresses when called for, and both regularly gave off a somewhat spaced-out, beach bunny vibe that belied their innate intelligence. Both actresses have sadly passed on now, but their beauty and talent will remain, captured on film and forever etched in time.

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Rustifer

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Rod Serling’s Opening Narration:

Given the chance, what young girl wouldn't happily exchange a plain face for a lovely one? What girl could refuse the opportunity to be beautiful? For want of a better estimate, let's call it the year 2000. At any rate, imagine a time in the future where science has developed the means of giving everyone the face and body he dreams of. It may not happen tomorrow, but it happens now in the Twilight Zone.

Cast:

Marilyn Cuberle Collin Wilcox Paxton
I remember Collin Wilcox Paxton best from her portrayal as the hopelessly backwoods Mayella in To Kill A Mockingbird.
It was the first time I ever heard a bedroom dresser referred to as a "chiffarobe".

But then, I'm from Indiana where we refer to a 'creek' as 'crick', 'roof' as 'ruff' and we warsh up before supper.
 

Mysto

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I remember Collin Wilcox Paxton best from her portrayal as the hopelessly backwoods Mayella in To Kill A Mockingbird.
It was the first time I ever heard a bedroom dresser referred to as a "chiffarobe".

But then, I'm from Indiana where we refer to a 'creek' as 'crick', 'roof' as 'ruff' and we warsh up before supper.
It's the hanging bar that does it. But without drawers it is armoire. :rolling-smiley:

Now I'm closing our doorwall and drinking my pop.

Cheers Russ
 

The 1960's

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I remember Collin Wilcox Paxton best from her portrayal as the hopelessly backwoods Mayella in To Kill A Mockingbird.
It was the first time I ever heard a bedroom dresser referred to as a "chiffarobe".

But then, I'm from Indiana where we refer to a 'creek' as 'crick', 'roof' as 'ruff' and we warsh up before supper.
I actually forgot Collin Wilcox Paxton was in To Kill A Mockingbird. I just rewatched this segment. Fine actress. I had to look up Chiffarobe.

Chifforobe
A chifforobe, also chiffarobe or chifferobe, is a closet-like piece of furniture that combines a long space for hanging clothes with a chest of drawers. Typically the wardrobe section runs down one side of the piece, while the drawers occupy the other side. It may have two enclosing doors or have the drawer fronts exposed and a separate door for the hanging space.
Wikipedia

It's the hanging bar that does it. But without drawers it is armoire. :rolling-smiley:

Now I'm closing our doorwall and drinking my pop.

Cheers Russ

Hey Marv is this where you park your behind watching classic tv and movies? I found it in your album.

mysto's
 

Mysto

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I actually forgot Collin Wilcox Paxton was in To Kill A Mockingbird. I just rewatched this segment. Fine actress. I had to look up Chiffarobe.

Chifforobe
A chifforobe, also chiffarobe or chifferobe, is a closet-like piece of furniture that combines a long space for hanging clothes with a chest of drawers. Typically the wardrobe section runs down one side of the piece, while the drawers occupy the other side. It may have two enclosing doors or have the drawer fronts exposed and a separate door for the hanging space.
Wikipedia



Hey Marv is this where you park your behind watching classic tv and movies? I found it in your album.

mysto's's
Yes Neal. Our theater has two of these facing a 10 foot wide screen. Love it. Most recently we upgraded to an Atmos sound bar. Not anywhere close to what some of our members have but to us it is movie heaven.
 

Purple Wig

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I often pick episodes without researching them first, always interesting when the same actor pops up in more than one of them. Today this happened with:

Felony Squad - “The Strangler”.
Barnaby Jones - “The Bounty Hunter”

Both featuring Jason Evers. “The Bounty Hunter” also starred Carl Weathers, who I once saw sitting alone in a coffee shop, around the time of his run on Arrested Development.
 

Flashgear

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Mr. Lucky – 1.31 “Stacked Deck”.
Mr. Lucky (John Vivyan) and his pal Andamo (Ross Martin) must contend with rich young blonde runaway, Margot (Yvette Mimieux), who has stowed away on their yacht-turned-floating restaurant, The Fortuna. The blonde is not the worst of their problems, though, as a Beatnik serial killer (Grant Williams, unrecognizable as the same guy from The Incredible Shrinking Man) is also on board, and determined to make Margot his next victim. The killer seems small fry compared to some of the hard cases Lucky and Andamo have taken out in past episodes, but the story rachets up some decent suspense…and this time it’s Andamo who ends up with the buxom Ms. Mimieux in his arms, not Lucky (Ross Martin, you old lady killer, you...)

There's some nicely noirish lighting on display here, as well as several clever camera setups, courtesy of veteran feature film director Jack Arnold (including a scene with a gun-toting Williams in the foreground and a pensive Vivyan reflected in a background mirror.) Needless to say, Yvette Mimieux, just a hair over 18 years old here, looks sensational. I’ve always considered Mimieux and Carol Lynley as similar types: both petite, stacked blondes, both fine actresses when called for, and both regularly gave off a somewhat spaced-out, beach bunny vibe that belied their innate intelligence. Both actresses have sadly passed on now, but their beauty and talent will remain, captured on film and forever etched in time.

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Thank you so much for this fine review and screen caps, Jeff! Thanks to Neal also, for those lovely caps from The Time Machine. A lot of gorgeous girls on that series, but none more stunning than Yvette Mimieux. Pretty sad to hear that news, not long after I viewed much of her career film work on TV and feature films. A memorable turn also for Grant Williams in those Coke-bottle eyeglasses, full of Beatnic slang and snearingly calling Lucky 'dad', working off the Warner lot where he was a regular in all the WB shows and soon to be recurring lead on Hawaiian Eye.

Mr. Lucky...that whole series just screams style and elegance, with the 'cool' factor exemplified. John Vivyan and Ross Martin are a superb team, and as you pointed out, great talent like Jack Arnold and Boris Sagal were involved. The exquisite Henry Mancini music! What a damn, dirty shame it was ended prematurely, and for artificial reasons...the show's sponsors were spooked by a relatively small 'legion of decency' type write-in campaign complaining about the glamourization of professional gambling (why that didn't take down Maverick is thankfully unexplained). Of course, the producers of Mr. Lucky dispensed with the floating casino aspect of the Fortuna II and transformed it into a floating restaurant for the rest of the series, although still inexplicably anchored beyond the then 2 mile territorial waters.

About gambling on TV these days: I watch a lot of pro sports, and nearly every second G'damn commercial is for some sleazy online casino or sports book! How far we have fallen! Time for Pete Rose and Shoeless Joe Jackson to be in the Hall of Fame!

I believe it was the sponsors who backed out on renewing Mr. Lucky, as the show was doing well against NBC's The Deputy and ABC's Lawrence Welk Show. And Mr. Lucky benefitted from being in the midst of CBS' powerful Saturday night lineup (back when Saturday nights were a sought-after TV marketplace full of power competition, not like today where lots of cheaply made garbage resides). The CBS Saturday night lineup for 1959 was Perry Mason, Wanted Dead or Alive, Mr. Lucky, Have Gun Will Travel, Gunsmoke and Markham!

Yvette Mimieux, as you know, also features in another delightful outing in the superb short-lived series from a year earlier, Jock Mahoney's Yancy Derringer. Those two one-season series, Mr. Lucky and Yancy Derringer are among my most woefully lamented shows that were ended before their time. Damn Proctor and Gamble and Bristol Myers!
 
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Jeff Flugel

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Hawkins – 1.8 “Candidate for Murder”
Hawkins goes to Washington in this, the eighth and final TV movie, starring the great James Stewart as canny old fox and famed defense attorney, Billy Jim Hawkins. This time, Billy Jim and his cousin/legman R.J. (Strother Martin) have been called to D.C. by a senator (Pernell Roberts) to defend his campaign manager (Paul Burke), who has been charged with the murder of a muckraking newspaper columnist (John Larch). A terrific cast of suspects here, including the dead man’s protégé (Diana Hyland), whose career is on the upswing; her husband (John Ericson), whose career is in the toilet; fellow journalists, one who is jockeying to take over the dead man’s job (Andrew Prine), and the other (Mark Gordon) blinded years before by an acid attack meant for the victim; plus an old man (Ian Wolfe) and a union boss (David Sheiner). both with strong grudges against the victim. Wily Hawkins uses his folksy charm and sneaky courtroom tactics to finagle the truth out of the real killer and clear his client, Perry Mason-style. From what I’ve read online, CBS was interested in doing another season of the show but Stewart put the kibosh on it, apparently having tired of the TV grind. Too bad, but what we do have is a fun series of legal mysteries, raised up several notches by the presence of Stewart and the frequently high caliber array of guest stars.

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The Jimmy Stewart Show
1.3 “The Price of Plumbing is Numbing”
1.4 “Father and Son Game”
One reason Stewart might have become fed up with the TV machine after Hawkins is from his experience making 24 episodes of this gentle sitcom two years before. Its relaxed pace and cozy family hijinks must’ve seemed quaint in the volatile 1971 TV landscape, but today the show plays pretty well as a rather idiosyncratic, low-key little comedy. Each episode begins with the cute meta gimmick of Stewart introducing himself and the title of that week’s story directly to the audience. In the show proper, he plays James K. Howard, an anthropology professor at a small California college founded by his grandfather. Jim lives together with his beautiful and patient wife, Martha (Julie Adams, still looking fab), and young son, Jake (Kirby Furlong). Due to Jim’s accidentally burning down their house in the first episode, the family of his older son, Peter (Jonathan Daly) – including wife (Ellen Geer) and son, Teddy (Dennis Larson), approximately the same age as Jake – have temporarily moved back in with them. “The Price of Plumbing is Numbing” centers on the difficulties of morning bathroom and toilet access for the newly-doubled Howard household, as Jim is forced to drive to the local service station, get a buck's worth of gas and use their facilities. After a couple of morning's of this, Jim's becoming grumpier and grumpier. Can the family come up with a plan to accommodate everyone’s morning ablutions? In “Father and Son Game,” when Jim’s non-athletic younger son, Jake, is down in the dumps because he lacks the necessary skills to join the Booster Club’s annual father-son baseball game, it’s up to Jim to find some way to enable the boy to participate in the event.

Stewart is on amusingly crusty form in this show, and while the show is rarely laugh-out-loud funny, it’s consistently amusing and most episodes end on a note of uplifting, heartfelt sweetness. The only false note for me is Daly; I just have a hard time buying him as Stewart’s grown-up son. It’s not the actor’s fault, really, more the way the part is written. But it's possible he - and his character - may grow on me over the next 20 episodes. Special mention must be given to character actor extraordinaire John McGiver, who brightens up each episode as Jim's best friend and colleague, Dr. Luther Quince.

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Bronk – 1.3 “The Gauntlet”
Ann Wedgeworth (perhaps best known for her role on Evening Shade) gives a memorably raw, edgy and unstudied performance as the long-time girlfriend of a notorious gangster (David Sheiner) who the D.A. wants her to testify against in a murder trial. Lt. Alex Bronkov (Jack Palance) agrees to act as her bodyguard and escort her across the state…but is her burgeoning romantic interest in him genuine, or all part of a set-up? Just when you think Bronk’s going to wind up a love-starved patsy, he shows that he was two steps ahead of the game all along, and the episode concludes with an exciting car chase and cat-and-mouse showdown in the desert. I’m continuing to enjoy this one-season-and-done police drama, and it’s a kick to see the usually scary Palance in sensitive (but still manly) good guy mode.

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Most Wanted – 1.8 “The Ten Pencenter”
The last hurrah for Quinn-Martin TV dramas, Most Wanted ran for 23 episodes from 1976-1977, and stars a 58-year-old and still fighting fit Robert Stack as the head of an elite police unit, along with younger partners Shelly Novack and cutie pie Jo Ann Harris. In this one, Stack goes toe-to-toe with guest baddie Lynda Day George, as a defense attorney who handpicks certain of her past clients to pull off lucrative home robberies, taking 10% of the haul as payment for her research and planning. Not only does Ms. Day George look great as usual, she also proves to be a worthy adversary, wily and resourceful. She’s one cold, calculating customer here, and gives ol’ Stack a real run for his money…but he nabs her in the end. Lalo Schifrin’s main theme is a good one. Also with Len Birman, Sharon Spelman, Joan Pringle and Hari Rhodes (as the Mayor).

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Combat! – 5.22 “A Little Jazz”
Sgt. Saunders (gruff Vic Morrow) and his squad are forced to take along a stranded USO jazz quintet, led by querulous bandleader Bernie Wallace (Dan Duryea). The group hole up inside a bombed out, abandoned millhouse to await an escort for the musicians, but are soon pinned down by a German patrol. Another excellent, tense outing, featuring a strong supporting cast which includes Noah Beery, Jr., Dennis Hopper, Joe Maross and Robert Easton. Duryea turns in yet another terrific guest star performance (his second on the show), and Morrow easily commands attention with his stoic, authoritative demeanor.

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The Rifleman – 2.29 “Shotgun Man”
John Anderson, under some heavy yet quite effective old age make-up, does a great job playing Beaumont, a broken-down former outlaw who’s recently been released from serving a 15-year prison sentence and is out for revenge on the man who put him there – Lucas McCain (Chuck Connors). Beaumont is prematurely aged, with trembling hands, a shuffling gait and weak vision, but he’s still a man to be reckoned with…as a nosy gunfighter (Jack Elam) finds out to his detriment. Directed with taut, economical style by B-movie specialist Joseph H. Lewis. I might have to amend what I said a few pages back about John Russell’s holding the record for most intimidating death stare…watching him here, I think big bad Chuck Connors can match him all the way. I do prefer the more iconic title sequence from S1, though.

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McMillan & Wife – 3.2 “The Devil You Say”
Enjoyable if rather outlandish Halloween episode finds Sally (the adorable Susan St. James) targeted by a Satanic cult, apparently due to her uncanny resemblance to an ancient priestess. One of the cult members tries to warn Sally and then disappears, later turning up murdered, and somebody’s playing mind games with the McMillan’s live-in housekeeper Mildred (Nancy Walker, a little of whom goes a long way). It’s up to Sally's millionaire police chief hubby Mac (Rock Hudson) and Sgt. Enright (John Shuck) to put the clues together and rescue her before she’s sacrificed by the coven. The eclectic guest cast includes Keenan Wynn as a wide-eyed Satanist; Werner Klemperer as a physician with an interest in the occult; Robert Hooks as a former Asst. D.A. who lost his job when Mac nailed him for doctoring evidence; Barbara Colby, as the wife of the dead man; and John “voice of Piglet” Fielder as a forensics expert.

I was originally planning to view this one back in October, but thought it might be fairly weak tea for the HTF’s annual "Scary Movie" challenge. I was right, as it’s not remotely frightening in its execution, though there are some creepy ideas scattered about. But I still had fun seeing our husband-and-wife sleuths deal with such an oddball premise. Rock Hudson does his usual smooth old pro job, making this kind of slick leading man stuff look easy, and he and St. James spark off each other very well. And who can resist the recurring motif of the lithe St. James prancing around in her bedtime attire of a '49ers football jersey and seemingly little else?

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Last of the Summer Wine
10.2 “Treasure of the Deep”
10.5 “Downhill Racer”
Having recently received a few more DVD sets of this venerable Britcom, I’d thought I spend a bit more time checking out the “Seymour” years of the show (1986-1990). I’m not yet 100% sold on all the newly-added ancillary characters (such as Pearl, Howard, Marina, Edie, Wesley etc.) who joined the show along with Michael Aldridge’s Seymour, and remained with the series till the very end of S31 (or, in a few case, until they passed away). But at least at this early stage, the focus thankfully remains centered on our main trio of increasingly aged reprobates and their goofball antics in the bucolic Yorkshire countryside…which is just how I like it. Seymour is a more amiable, avuncular figure than his predecessors, Foggy or Blamire, but can still deliver a withering putdown when required. He’s a former headmaster and frustrated inventor who concocts all manner of improbable gadgets which he then cajoles his mechanic brother-in-law Wesley (Gordon Wharmby) to construct for him…and invariably, it’s scruffy little Compo (Bill Owen) who’s “volunteered” to test them out.

In the very funny “Treasure of the Deep,” Compo’s chance fall into the river inspires Seymour to embark on a treasure hunt, sending Compo underwater in a homemade, pedal-powered submarine. The climactic payoff to this one results in some great visual gags. And in the climax of “Downhill Racer,” Seymour somehow convinces Compo to climb aboard a bicycle on skis and plummet down a hillside…straight into the arms of his horse-faced would-be inamorata, Nora Batty. Still massively enjoying this show, and will likely keep collecting it on DVD…for a few more volumes, anyway. I’ve no plans to go further than S21, the last with Bill Owen’s Compo.
 
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Jeff Flugel

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Yvette Mimieux, as you know, also features in another delightful outing in the superb short-lived series from a year earlier, Jock Mahoney's Yancy Derringer. Those two one-season series, Mr. Lucky and Yancy Derringer are among my most woefully lamented shows that were ended before their time. Damn Proctor and Gamble and Bristol Myers!
Thanks for the comments, Randall! Yes, it's a pity that Mr. Lucky - much like Yancy Derringer - was cancelled after a single season, due not to a lack of ratings success, but to petty backstage power-brokering between the producers, studio and sponsors. Both very good shows which I'm pleased to have in my collection (Thank you, Timeless Media Group!)

Speaking of Yancy, I plan to check out the episode guest starring the late Yvette Mimieux later this morning. According to IMDB, that episode ("Collector's Item") appears to be her very first credited acting role...and she would have been only 17 years old at the time! Boy, they sure hired their starlets young back in the day, eh?
 
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Rustifer

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Yes Neal. Our theater has two of these facing a 10 foot wide screen. Love it. Most recently we upgraded to an Atmos sound bar. Not anywhere close to what some of our members have but to us it is movie heaven.
You have a 10 foot wide screen, Marv? Our kids bought us a considerably tinier 50" for our bedroom, which--since my wife views watching television about as delightful as aluminum-flavored chewing gum, is about 49" too large.
 
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Rustifer

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Mr. Lucky...that whole series just screams style and elegance, with the 'cool' factor exemplified. John Vivyan and Ross Martin are a superb team, and as you pointed out, great talent like Jack Arnold and Boris Sagal were involved. The exquisite Henry Mancini music! What a damn, dirty shame it was ended prematurely, and for artificial reasons...the show's sponsors were spooked by a relatively small 'legion of decency' type write-in campaign complaining about the glamourization of professional gambling (why that didn't take down Maverick is thankfully unexplained). Of course, the producers of Mr. Lucky dispensed with the floating casino aspect of the Fortuna II and transformed it into a floating restaurant for the rest of the series, although still inexplicably anchored beyond the then 2 mile territorial waters.
Great behind-the scenes stuff on Jeff's review of this show, Randall. Another show of the era facing "decency" roadblocks was The Untouchables--stirring up the wrath of law-abiding Italian-Americans being depicted as machine gun-carrying thugs, J. Edgar Hoover for its fictionalized representation of the FBI, the National Association for Better Radio and Television and last but not least, my mom.

Despite all that, the series successfully plugged through 4 seasons. Seems like riverboat gambling is kinda tame in comparison.
 
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Jeff Flugel

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Well, I think you knew what I meant, Howie (i.e. underage actresses playing adult roles), but fair play to you.

I guess a 17-year-old Yvette Mimieux is no big deal...especially when Warner Bros. allowed 16-year-old Melody Patterson to repeatedly make out with Ken Berry on F-Troop.

51OCPy6CE8L._AC_.jpg


At any rate, this is Hollywood we're talking about, so why should I be surprised? Even so, I doubt you'd see a 16-year-old actress necking with a guy twice her age on screen these days.
 
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Mysto

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marv long
You have a 10 foot wide screen, Marv? Our kids bought us a considerably tinier 50" for our bedroom, which--since my wife views watching television about as delightful as aluminum-flavored chewing gum, is about 49" too large.
It is projection Russ and when they get that big they're not television - they're THEATER ah hum! (pinky extended) <_<
 

BobO'Link

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You have a 10 foot wide screen, Marv? Our kids bought us a considerably tinier 50" for our bedroom, which--since my wife views watching television about as delightful as aluminum-flavored chewing gum, is about 49" too large.
Sounds a bit like my wife... She's been using my old (very old) 32" CRT for ~4 years (replaced the 19" one she'd been using when I got a 42" WS set) and commented a couple of years ago she wanted a WS set to put on a wall in the LR (between the hallway door and dining room doors - where the TV now sits in a cabinet). So... I got a 49" non-smart (I see no reason for a "smart" TV as the apps go out-of-date far too soon) set that would fill that area quite nicely (there'd be 2" on each side - great fit). Nope... she didn't want one "that big" (for the record, she thinks my 42" set is too big and thinks I'm nuts for wanting a 60"+ set) so it's been collecting dust in the box waiting for either my set to die or me decide I want something a bit larger and swap them out (and I'd planned to do that at first but she balked at me putting the 42" in the bedroom - there's no set there at all and she wants to keep it that way - I get it, but...). I *think* she wants something 32" or smaller for that wall and I just don't see the point. If that's the largest she wants I see no issue keeping the CRT as long as it's working. :wacko:
 

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