What did you watch this week in classic TV on DVD(or Blu)?

Jack P

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I mention all of that to say the sole redeeming feature of those episodes was the appearance of Barbara Rhoades in mostly skimpy swim suite type costumes.
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Another episode I didn't care for was the predictable "A Christmas Carol" episode where Dickens was rewritten to be a half hour episode no different than any of the dozens of other times this trope has been hauled out to fill time. I put these episodes in the "A very special episode" group of ones I'll always skip no matter what show does them.

Frank Nelson, aka "the yessss guy" was also in several S5 episodes - different character in each and always with his trademark "Yessss" (something I've always found a bit grating):
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Never was there a more criminally under-utilized presence on 70s TV than Barbara Rhoades. I've always felt her no-BS attitude and Amazonian prowess would have been terrific for a "Police Woman" type show (frankly I never cared for Dickinson in that one). And if "Batman" had still been on, she would have been the PERFECT Poison Ivy.

As for Frank Nelson, I noticed how all his shoehorned guest shots came after Jack Benny's passing and it was as if they were trying to find a way for him to continue his Benny routines with someone else (in the early 80s he got some new mileage out of the gimmick in some McDonalds spots).
 

MatthewA

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One of the weirdest episodes after Redd Foxx's return wasn't even an original plotline: "Fred Meets Redd" from Season 6 had — you guessed it — Fred meeting Redd Foxx. Lucille Ball did it first three years earlier having her meet her Here's Lucy character Lucy Carter to promote the movie of the musical Mame in the last season of her show*. The Sanford and Son redo was actually an improvement; I couldn't even finish Lucy's version, sad to say.

Bud Yorkin had already split from Norman Lear by that point. The first spinoff Grady was under his company, Bud Yorkin Productions, while the other two after the show ended were via Tandem.

It must have been odd to pick up a TV Guide in the fall of 1977 only to find Redd Foxx on a variety show on ABC while NBC tried to build a show around his old show's set. After Columbia bought out Lear and Yorkin separately and Sony bought Columbia, they tried something similar again in the 1990s by putting a black family in Archie Bunker's house with 704 Hauser. CBS had better ratings with actual All in the Family reruns three years earlier!

As for Frank Nelson, I noticed how all his shoehorned guest shots came after Jack Benny's passing and it was as if they were trying to find a way for him to continue his Benny routines with someone else (in the early 80s he got some new mileage out of the gimmick in some McDonalds spots).
My first experience with Frank Nelson was one of his last roles: the Paradise World motel clerk in the 1986 animated special Garfield in Paradise. Film Roman, the studio behind the Garfield specials and CBS-TV series, later took over The Simpsons and created a character named "the Yes Guy."



*That also has a Norman Lear connection: Ned Wertimer, The Jeffersons' Ralph the Doorman, was in it. So was Leonard Stone, who played Violet's father from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, which Jean Stapleton turned down.
 
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BobO'Link

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One of the weirdest episodes after Redd Foxx's return wasn't even an original plotline: "Fred Meets Redd" from Season 6 had — you guessed it — Fred meeting Redd Foxx. Lucille Ball did it first three years earlier having her meet her Here's Lucy character Lucy Carter to promote the movie of the musical Mame in the last season of her show*. The Sanford and Son redo was actually an improvement; I couldn't even finish Lucy's version, sad to say.
I'd have caught that "rip off" had I not given up on Here's Lucy by the time that season aired. I didn't particularly like that Sanford and Son episode.

I Love Lucy - the half hour episodes only - is one of my all-time favorite comedy series. The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour was OK but, for me, the series just didn't work that well in an hour format. And she'd also started to recycle scripts/gags by then. My sister and I watched all of her series and I quickly discovered she essentially recycled the majority of her subsequent series from ILL scripts, always doing them worse as time progressed. Her post ILL series were my first experience in someone pretty much resting on their laurels, milking the past for all it was worth. I mostly enjoyed The Lucy Show in spite of its faults and penchant for using recycled ILL scripts and own a copy of that one. By the time Here's Lucy, which costarred her children, came along I'd pretty much given up on her. I did watch a few episodes of that one but found it quite lacking in talent (her kids can't act and she was almost a caricature of her former self by then). I've almost purchased a copy of that one a few times but then Amazon put it up for Prime streaming so I sampled it instead. Yeah... I'll likely leave this one out of the collection as I found it to be as lacking as I did when it originally aired.
Bud Yorkin had already split from Norman Lear by that point. The first spinoff Grady was under his company, Bud Yorkin Productions, while the other two after the show ended were via Tandem.
I don't remember Grady at all - but, as I've stated before, I pretty much didn't bother with products from Norman Lear. It wouldn't have helped that I didn't care for that character in Sanford and Son.
It must have been odd to pick up a TV Guide in the fall of 1977 only to find Redd Foxx on a variety show on ABC while NBC tried to build a show around his old show's set. After Columbia bought out Lear and Yorkin separately and Sony bought Columbia, they tried something similar again in the 1990s by putting a black family in Archie Bunker's house with 704 Hauser. CBS had better ratings with actual All in the Family reruns three years earlier!
I graduated college the summer of 77. That fall I moved to Paris, TX and was busy working and trying to make a life far from home. The only thing I absolutely remember seeing that fall was Monty Python's Flying Circus. The Dallas PBS affiliate ran it on Saturday night. I'd always heard about the series but it never ran in the Mid-South so I wasn't about to miss out on that one! I loved it from the first episode I saw.

Looking over the schedule for that fall I see very few series I know I watched. I read quite a bit back then so am pretty sure I did lots of reading instead of watching TV. I don't remember seeing, or hearing about, The Redd Foxx Comedy Hour. I may have watched Barnaby Jones as it was on opposite and I did watch that one on occasion but I really don't remember. I just know that that season was one of the first TV seasons I recall pining for the return of "good" TV shows. For once, I had lots of free time (new town and didn't know many people) but there were very few shows on TV I cared to watch - unlike when I was in HS (late 60s/early70s) when almost every night was full of tough choices.
My first experience with Frank Nelson was one of his last roles: the Paradise World motel clerk in the 1986 animated special Garfield in Paradise. Film Roman, the studio behind the Garfield specials and CBS-TV series, later took over The Simpsons and created a character named "the Yes Guy."

I saw that image when looking up Mr. Nelson and wondered what it was about. I recall him from The Jack Benny Show where I found his catchphrases (he also used "Oooh DO theyyy" in every bit) rather annoying, although the audience seemed to love it. I did like the insults and one-liners he'd throw at Benny.
 
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Flashgear

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Quentin Tarantino, at his New Beverly Theater website, has just posted a new review of the 1974 QM telefilm (and pilot for the series that fall) Manhunter, starring Ken Howard, Stefanie Powers, Gary Lockwood and James Olson...along with 1972's Banyon, another of QM's action shows set in the 1930s as part of a nostalgia wave for that era that was a current of early 1970's popular culture with shows like The Waltons and major feature films like The Godfather, Chinatown etc.,...Tarantino remembers seeing it first run as a 12 year old in February 1974, but has clearly also seen it lately (I'll bet his copy looks far better than my multi-gen VHS duped source)...wouldn't it be great if someone of Tarantino's stature and influence got CBS to release the whole series on DVD?

Read his review (with a few typos and minor factual errors) on the New Beverly site:
 
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Jeff Flugel

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It never entered my head to check if the writing staff changed after Foxx's return. If so, that certainly explains many of the little changes in things. So... I had to look it up. Nope... same 2 writers for most of the series: Ray Galtin and Alan Simpson received writing credits for all 135 episodes. No one else even came close with a couple of dozen receiving 1 credit each. Even in S5, the most with 1 episode writing credits, there were only 10 or so credited to others (I'm sure Galtin and Simpson served as either editors on or rewrote even those since they received a credit on all episodes).
I don't think that Galton and Simpson actually wrote any Sanford and Son episodes, Howie...they were of course the creators and writers of Steptoe and Son (which Sanford was based on) and so their credit on Sanford was I think only a "created by" one, as the U.S. version's episodes were often based on their original scripts for Steptoe. According to IMDB (which, of course, is not always accurate, ha ha!), the duo didn't actually write any episodes directly for Sanford. Wikipedia shows a host of writers for Sanford, none of them being Galton and Simpson (who also wrote for Hancock's Half Hour, Frankie Howerd and others.

As to how closely the stories and dialogue of Sanford and Son followed those of Steptoe and Son, I've no idea (not being a fan of either series.) It'll be interesting to hear your take on that once you work your way through Steptoe, which I believe you mentioned was one of your next viewing projects.
 

BobO'Link

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I don't think that Galton and Simpson actually wrote any Sanford and Son episodes, Howie...they were of course the creators and writers of Steptoe and Son (which Sanford was based on) and so their credit on Sanford was I think only a "created by" one, as the U.S. version's episodes were often based on their original scripts for Steptoe. According to IMDB (which, of course, is not always accurate, ha ha!), the duo didn't actually write any episodes directly for Sanford. Wikipedia shows a host of writers for Sanford, none of them being Galton and Simpson (who also wrote for Hancock's Half Hour, Frankie Howerd and others.

As to how closely the stories and dialogue of Sanford and Son followed those of Steptoe and Son, I've no idea (not being a fan of either series.) It'll be interesting to hear your take on that once you work your way through Steptoe, which I believe you mentioned was one of your next viewing projects.
Yeah... I was going solely by the IMDB information. From what I've read there were around 25 or so Steptoe episodes which were "adapted" for the US from its 7 series. From IMDB: "Initially co-writer Aaron Ruben thought that meant that the show had seven years worth of scripts to adapt." That gives me the impression he thought he'd not have that much to do on the series. So... going by all that info, yours about Galton & Simpson, plus the number of different writers listed on IMDB, it looks like there was a regular revolving door of writers on the series. Even Foxx wrote a couple (a 4th and a 5th season episode I wasn't too impressed with). No wonder it lacked consistency...
 
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Jasper70

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Tonight I watched two episodes from season four of The Twilight Zone. I’m not really a fan of the hour long format but I enjoyed the second episode “No Time like the Past”. Left me wondering if it had influenced BTTF 3.
After that was a Mannix episode, I have eight left in the last season and then that one is done. I have enjoyed it but I have watched it over the last six years or so. Sometimes watch several episodes a week and then none for months.
Finally I ended the night with an NCIS episode from season two. I’m enjoying NCIS but fairly formulaic, maybe I’ll feel different later in the series.
 

Jack P

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By sheer coincidence I am going through the entire S4 of TZ in sequence! And right now I am in fact in the middle of "No Time Like The Past". I'll probably have a post later after I finish with just some short blurbs on each episode but so far I can say that "He's Alive" is one of the all-time worst episodes of the series. It's heavy-handedness makes "I Am The Night Color Me Black" seem tame by comparison.

Interesting bit of trivia. "No Time Like The Past" stars Dana Andrews in a time travel story. The very next episode, "The Parallel" also deals with time displacements and stars Andrews' brother, Steve Forrest!
 
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JohnHopper

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By sheer coincidence I am going through the entire S4 of TZ in sequence! And right now I am in fact in the middle of "No Time Like The Past". I'll probably have a post later after I finish with just some short blurbs on each episode but so far I can say that "He's Alive" is one of the all-time worst episodes of the series. It's heavy-handedness makes "I Am The Night Color Me Black" seem tame by comparison.

Interesting bit of trivia. "No Time Like The Past" stars Dana Andrews in a time travel story. The very next episode, "The Parallel" also deals with time displacements and stars Andrews' brother, Steve Forrest!
The worst of the worst is “The Bard”: when comedy doesn't work. I never liked that season 4: too padded.
 
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MatthewA

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I don't remember Grady at all - but, as I've stated before, I pretty much didn't bother with products from Norman Lear. It wouldn't have helped that I didn't care for that character in Sanford and Son.
Well, no disrespect intended, but for a non-fan, you sure seem to drop his name a lot. That show seems to be the least political out of all his major works, and that probably helped it over the years in syndication and later home video. Columbia House released all but 20 episodes of the show on VHS back in the 1990s before the studios started throwing shows to the wall on DVD to see what would stick. Some shows they stopped at the initial 10 volumes. It was bulky and expensive, but it was the only way to see shows without the syndication edits.

As for the spinoff, I'm surprised they didn't just give it to Bubba since they reduced his role on the show anyway. I guess NBC learned the wrong lesson from the salary negotiations with Redd Foxx that resulted in all those episodes where Fred was absent. I guess some characters work better as supporting characters.
 
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Flashgear

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I have to disagree big time on TZ's season four The Bard being a bad episode...to me, that's one of the treasures to be had among that season's 18 episodes...when it isn't being supremely witty in it's biting satirical take on formulaic network TV and early '60's pop culture, which is often, it remains completely charming in it's execution as a modern day fable. Loved it as a 7 year old and find it has so much more to say to me today. And we get to see some very early evidence of the hallmarks that fans of Burt Reynolds star persona would come to love, here and on Gunsmoke.
 
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BobO'Link

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Well, no disrespect intended, but for a non-fan, you sure seem to drop his name a lot.
:laugh: None taken. In spite of my leftist leanings I've always found his work to be abrasive, insulting (on many levels), and incredibly cheaply produced. His production techniques were "borrowed" by many others and reduced the quality level of TV productions for decades.

FWIW, Sanford and Son is one I like simply because he mostly left his politics out of it. Even then, it's not one I'll watch very often. Prior to watching this DVD set I'd not seen an episode in over 20 years. It was purchased mainly to compare to Steptoe and Son, its "inspiration" and a show I've never seen.
 
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MatthewA

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The 1970s was the last decade not graced by my presence, and the reminiscences of those who lived through it as adults or became adults then made it sound like they needed me.:biggrin: But that's actually one of the first shows I ever watched in reruns in the 1980s when it, Good Times, What's Happening!!, and The Andy Griffith Show were the shows that aired after my Mom's soaps. She watched mainly CBS soaps but started watching All My Children at the turn of the century. By that time, TV stations traded out reruns for talk shows. Some of the people who hosted some of the less successful ones were people who had been fixtures of reruns, like Danny Bonaduce and Tempestt Bledsoe.


:laugh: None taken. In spite of my leftist leanings I've always found his work to be abrasive, insulting (on many levels), and incredibly cheaply produced. His production techniques were "borrowed" by many others and reduced the quality level of TV productions for decades.
My reservations are different from yours: the underlying assumption that belonging to one or more minority group(s) = automatically politically on the left seems to pervade so many of these shows.* This mentality got worse after the 1980s from other producers.** Somewhere at my Mom's house, I have a Beta tape of his induction into the Television Hall of Fame, and in his acceptance speech, he longed for a day when TV was no longer dictated by commercial interests. A year later, he sold Embassy to Coca-Cola, one of those same commercial interests who still has sway over the content of TV. The only difference is, we have more options besides The Big Three networks. And now we have movie theater-quality TV screens and projectors (which helps since they've closed the movie theaters).

*Okay, not always since there was one Jeffersons episode where Helen has to explain to Tom why she's not voting for a black candidate running for office: she considers him a dishonest political opportunist. If only they had taken the lesson from that episode to heart.
**That's why I quit watching Family Guy, whose credits pay homage to All in the Family's piano opening. They want to have it both ways by having a completely amoral cartoon that lectures its audience.
 
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Flashgear

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I recently enjoyed watching the unsold TV pilot Dark Intruder, produced by Alfred Hitchcock's Shamley productions, and intended to launch a series called The Black Cloak for the fall of 1965. The long running Alfred Hitchcock Presents/Hour was wrapping up it's 10 year run that spring...Having gone unsold, Universal and Hitchcock producers Jack Laird and Norman Lloyd re-cut the pilot, supplementing it with about 5 extra minutes previously unused, and it was released theatrically worldwide on a double bill with William Castle's I Saw What You Did (Joan Crawford), or alternatively, The Night Walker (Barbara Stanwyk, Robert Taylor)...Dark Intruder bested both of these other films in the critic's reviews, sometimes drawing raves from more appreciative types in the media.

A lot of fans, myself included, see many parallels between Dark Intruder and another Universal horror/occult series produced almost 10 years later, Kolchak: The Night Stalker...In Dark Intruder, Leslie Nielsen plays the 1890s San Francisco author Brent Kingsford, an intellectual bon-vivant who dabbles (by neccessity) in the study of the Occult and ancient Mythologies as a consultant to SFPD Chief Harvey Misbach (Gilbert Green) to help stop a series of brutal and bloody murders, where a strange ivory carving has been left at each crime scene...Kingsford is aided by his trusty assistant Nikola (Charles Bolender), a hirsute mighty midget and confidant...Kingsford's Occult library is full of dusty manuscripts and antiquities...a Mandrake plant, said to be "sensitive to dark occult forces", holds a place of prominence and trembles as a warning when Kingsford is threatened by approaching evils...Kingsford's long time friends, Robert Vandenburg (Peter Mark Richman) and Evelyn Lang (Judi Meredith), are about to be married...but Robert is now seriously unwell, suffering periodic catatonic episodes with disturbing and horrific imagery experienced as a nightmare...having been called to the police station, Kingsford discovers that 4 of these strange and ugly carvings have been recovered at the murder scenes...and that Chief Misbach is now under pressure from the city fathers to stop the murders, with it's tremendous media scrutiny and a panicked populace...many of whom seek out a popular spiritualist medium, Professor Malaki (Werner Klemperer, a few months before his Hogan's Heroes gig as Colonel Klink)...Kingsford, Robert and his fiance Evelyn sit in seance with Professor Malaki...a hooded character who chooses to linger only in the shadows of his parlor...

Kingsford takes one of the ivory sculptures to his friend Chi Zang (Peter Brocco), an Alchemist in Chinatown with a profound knowledge of ancient evils...Chi Zang, presumably also a regular character had the series sold, is a kind of a Huggy-Bear type informant on the streets, ha, ha...But Chi Zang is truly alarmed, recognizing the ivory carving as depicting a shape-shifting Sumerian demon from Ancient Mesopotamia...Chi Zang somberly intones: "This is a Sumerian God...old, old...before Babylon, before Egypt...with it's demons and acolytes so cruel...merciless, evil...banished from this world, but forever struggling to return!"...and Kingsford soon discovers that every one of the victims were members of an 1860s Archaeological expedition to Mesopotamia...a country in which his friend Robert was born!

My screen caps from the TCM/Universal double feature DVD...
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Kingsford's Latin Motto..."Everything ends in Mystery"...
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Kingsford, having survived another life threatening supernatural horror, tries to relax in his office...suddenly, his Mandrake plant begins to tremble once again...he fixes his gaze upon his guardian, and jokingly remarks: "Oh shut up! No one asked your opinion"...
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It's really too bad that this series didn't sell...this pilot is quite effective with a compelling and atmospheric story scripted by Barre Lyndon (The Lodger, Hangover Square, Night has a Thousand Eyes)...Music by the great Bronislaw Kaper...needless to say, a great cast as well...and it features a tremendously well done transformation scene that is far better than many such efforts in Universal's celebrated Monster movies...Werner Klemperer, as the mysterious and shadowy Professor Malaki, is never completely recognizable under his make-up...and when the film was re-cut for the theatrical release, Producer Norman Lloyd (still with us at age 106) re-dubbed Klemperer's lines so that he's never heard either!...Producer Jack Laird would go on to producing Night Gallery and The Questor Tapes in the early 70s...and was also producer of the long running cop show Kojak with Telly Savalas...
 

Rustifer

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Episode Commentary
Leave It To Beaver
"Ward's Golf Club" (S5E14)

It has been a while since I've done a Beaver episode. When I noticed I had this particular one recorded on my DVR, I was excited to review it since I remember seeing it when it first aired (1962).

Gilbert (Steven Talbot) shows off to Beaver a shoe box full of golf range balls that he's collected over the past few days. This, as everyone knows, is one of the first signs that Gilbert will grow up into heroin addiction and abuse his wife and kids. But that's a story for another time, yes? He convinces poor naive Beaver to swipe the golf clubs of his dad (Hugh Beaumont) so they can smack a few balls around. Suggestions like this from Gilbert is a sure recipe for disaster--and you'd think Beaver would know this by now.
But the persuasiveness of Gilbert is second only to fanatic Evangelic preachers who spellbind their unsuspecting flocks. Beaver fears trouble.
"Beaver", explains Gilbert, "Everything that's fun can get you in trouble." This eventually becomes the epitaph on Gilbert's headstone.

Ward comes home after a Saturday golf game, grumbling that he shot his "bowling score" and busted his driver in disgust. June's (Barbara Billingsley) interest in his woes is about equal to her desire to learn Islamic holiday chants. Instead, she opts to haul Ward off to the grocery store with her. It's a perfect opportunity for Beaver and Gilbert to secretly use Ward's clubs. Unbeknownst he's using the broken driver, Beaver takes a mighty swing at the ball only to have the loose driver head fly off. Breaking your dad's best driver supersedes barfing in the car or leaving a laundry basket full of your skid-marked undies. It's serious business.

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Gilbert foments an evil scheme; Then tees up in the Cleaver yard; Wally tests an early cellphone model; Beaver catches hell

Beaver decides to come clean until he hears Ward bawl out Wally (Tony Dow) for wearing one of his best office shirts. Ward figuratively screams "Leave my sh*t alone!"--but in a more sitcom-ish, 1962 manner. This freaks Beaver to the max, so he discusses his options with a sympathetic Wally. In my experience given a similar situation, my older brother would have chortled in glee over my pending disaster. Result-- Beaver decides to buy his dad a new club (on layaway) and covertly replace the broken one before Ward's next golf outing. Imagine Ward's amazement when he discovers his driver in perfect condition. He asks June "Remember when I showed you the loose head on my club?" June quips "Of course I do--I know a loose head when I see one". And people think there was no bawdy talk in this family-oriented series.

Anyway, the cat's out of the bag (literally), and Beaver fesses up. The moral of the story--if you're going to break one of your dad's clubs, make it the 1 iron. Even Phil Mickelson can't hit a 1 iron.
 

Doug Wallen

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Brian's Song - Bluray
1971 (November 30 1971) James Caan, Billy Dee Williams, Jack Warden, Bernie Casey, Shelley Fabares, David Huddleston. Timeless story of friendship through all types of challenges, including the '60's turbulent racism. Caan and Williams were an excellent pairing.

Gunsmoke - Seasons 10-12
Run Sheep Run (10.16) Burt Brinckerhoff, Tom Fadden, Ted Knight, Arthur Malet, Peter Whitney. The body of a no-good man is found in his burning store on the same night as the sudden disappearance of the nice couple he cheated out of the money for their ranch. A misunderstanding about a sale sets a young family on a tragic path.

Deputy Festus (10.17) Denver Pyle, Shug Fisher, Royal Dano guest as cousin/family of Festus. A comical episode that plays up the backwoods nature of the Haggen clan. They run from Dodge after assuming they have killed a man. He was injured by someone else.

One Killer On Ice (10.18) John Drew Barrymore, Dennis Hopper, Anne Helm. Anderson, a stylish bounty hunter, rides into Dodge City. He informs Matt that his partner has a wanted criminal at an ice house. The locale is a two-day ride from Dodge; Anderson wants Matt's help to bring the criminal in. The outlaw's brother intends to go gunning for Matt and Anderson. There's also a twist: Matt finds out Anderson didn't tell him the truth about what happened. Both Anderson's partner and the outlaw lie dead at the ice house.

Chief Joseph (10.19) Victor Jory, Robert Loggia, Leonard Stone, Joe Maross. Chief Joseph has come to town suffering from pneumonia. When he and his party are refused lodging at the hotel, a stranger steps in offering his room. Local sentiment is against this and like a boiling over teapot, trouble begins to brew.

Circus Trick (10.20) Walter Burke, Elizabeth MacRae, Warren Oates, Roy Roberts. A circus family comes to town and charms the populace, who don't know the family's real stock in trade is larceny.

Song For Dying (10.21) Theodore Bikel, Roger Ewing, Lee Majors, Robert F. Simon, Ford Rainey. The head of the Lukens clan blames Martin Kellums for not helping his young bride during a difficult childbirth when the doctor was away. When Kellums runs to Dodge, Matt does his best to keep everyone safe including the local citizens.

Winner Take All (10.22) Tom Simcox, John Milford, Margaret Bly, H. M. Wynant, Nestor Paiva. The head of the Lukens clan blames Martin Kellums for not helping his young bride during a difficult childbirth when the doctor was away. When Kellums runs to Dodge, Matt does his best to keep everyone safe including the local citizens.

Hawaii Five-O - Complete Season 1
Not That Much Different (1.21) Dennis Cooney, Stewart Moss, Lee Paul, Ann Prentiss. The leader of a band of protesters is killed while confronting the general of a foreign nation. Authorities initially believe it was an assassination attempt on the general's life. Five-O, however, turns up leads that the lead protester was the intended victim of the killer. McGarrett & Co. probe the backgrounds of the other protesters. While the young people protested for peace, it turns out some of them did have motive. Not that good.

Cannon - The Complete Series
Come Watch Me Die (3.7) Michael Tolan, Meg Foster, Ahna Capri, John Larch, Don Stroud, Will Kuluva. A convicted murderer escapes from the state hospital for the criminally insane, and Cannon is hired to find him before the police do.

The Perfect Alibi (3.8) L. Q. Jones, Richard Anderson, Whit Bissell, William Watson, Burton Gilliam. A businessman's office is burglarized, the safe cracked, and the cash payroll stolen. A former business partner is the obvious suspect, due to his knowledge of the office layout and safe combination, but he has an alibi: he was in prison at the time.

Dead Lady's Tears (3.9) Dabney Coleman, Peter White, Charles Haid, Amanda McBroom, John Considine. A man's model/girlfriend is murdered in her apartment shortly after she tells him she's leaving for a New York job, and he hires Cannon to exonerate him.

The Limping Man (3.10) Jason Evers, Barbara Stuart, Richard O'Brien, Anthony Zerbe, Vic Tayback. A man with a limp is intercepted at the airport by police, but he inexplicably escapes while held at gunpoint by a cop, an old police buddy of Cannon's.

Trial By Terror (3.11) Simon Scott, Mark Miller, Keith Andes, Ray Danton, Stewart Moss, Ned Romero. When a criminal on trial, kidnaps the daughter of the judge to get him to dismiss the case. He then calls Frank to find his daughter before he is forced to make that choice.

Murder By The Numbers (3.12) Dina Merrill, Glenn Corbett, Burr DeBenning, Ben Wright, Oscar Beregi, Jr. A wealthy middle-aged woman's fiancé disappears shortly before their scheduled wedding, and she hires Cannon to find him.

Perry Mason - Seasons 7-9
The Case of The Wrathful Wraith (9.9) Jeanne Bal, Marion Moses, Gene Lyons, Walter Brooke. Perry successfully defends Louise Selff when she is charged with killing her husband. The pressure of the trial has affected Louise so when strange things happen, it appears she killed him again when it turns out he was still alive.

The Case of The Runaway Racer (9.10) Hank Brandt, Jan Shepard, Anthony Caruso, Gavin MacLeod, Michael Constantine. Pete Griston is a race car driver in a new partnership. After the fact, he asked Perry to look it over and he discovers problems. When Pete has an accident in a test car, it starts a series of events leading to the murder of his partner.

The Case of Silent Six (9.11) Skip Homeier, Dianne Foster, Cyril Delavanti, Virginia Gregg. Susan Wolfe is beaten within an inch of her life while her neighbors sit and do nothing. Her overprotective brother, Dave, an L.A. police detective, runs to the apartment to check on his sister and is knocked unconscious as a man is killed.

The Case of The Fugitive Fraulein (9.12) Gregory Morton, Kevin Hagen, Ronald Long, Jeannette Nolan. Perry is asked to help get a scientist's granddaughter out of East Germany so she can live with her mother's parents. A go-between is murdered during negotiations and the scientist's wife is charged, so Perry defends her in East Germany.

Rawhide - Season 2 - Volume 2
Incident of the Tinker's Dam (2.17) Regis Toomey, Anthony Dexter. Wishbone buries his brother "alive" to keep Kiowas from killing him for romancing the stony chief's wife. T.J. turns out to be a comical embarrassment: a pot fixer whose customers fight to scalp him for his shoddy tinking, which is his ploy for woman chasing. A twist ending plays out as I expected.

Incident of the Night Horse (2.18) George Wallace, Judy Nugent. An embittered mustanger known by Gil Favor in his younger days blocks the pass that the herd needs to use to reach a river ford where they can cross safely. The mustanger is haunted by a fierce stallion who killed his son, once a friend of Favor.

Incident of the Sharpshooter (2.19) Jock Mahoney, Stafford Repp, Hugh Sanders, Raymond Greenleaf, Harry Ellerbe, Olan Soule. An outlaw usurps a dead man's identity and he is heading for the next town along with the drovers. When Rowdy gets in the middle of his business he finds himself in serious trouble and it is up to Mr. Favor to figure out a way of saving him.

Incident of the Dust Flower (2.20) Margaret Phillips, Arthur Shields, Tom Drake, Frances Bavier. The drovers rescue an injured traveler and his grown daughter, who is sensitive about her unmarried status. The woman flees, but scout Pete Nolan locates her. Upon learning that she can't face patronizing relatives in the town she's moving to, Pete decides to accompany her there and pose as her fiancé.

Good viewing.
 

JohnHopper

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John Hopper
I recently enjoyed watching the unsold TV pilot Dark Intruder, produced by Alfred Hitchcock's Shamley productions, and intended to launch a series called The Black Cloak for the fall of 1965. The long running Alfred Hitchcock Presents/Hour was wrapping up it's 10 year run that spring...Having gone unsold, Universal and Hitchcock producers Jack Laird and Norman Lloyd re-cut the pilot, supplementing it with about 5 extra minutes previously unused, and it was released theatrically worldwide on a double bill with William Castle's I Saw What You Did (Joan Crawford), or alternatively, The Night Walker (Barbara Stanwyk, Robert Taylor)...Dark Intruder bested both of these other films in the critic's reviews, sometimes drawing raves from more appreciative types in the media.

A lot of fans, myself included, see many parallels between Dark Intruder and another Universal horror/occult series produced almost 10 years later, Kolchak: The Night Stalker...In Dark Intruder, Leslie Nielsen plays the 1890s San Francisco author Brent Kingsford, an intellectual bon-vivant who dabbles (by neccessity) in the study of the Occult and ancient Mythologies as a consultant to SFPD Chief Harvey Misbach (Gilbert Green) to help stop a series of brutal and bloody murders, where a strange ivory carving has been left at each crime scene...Kingsford is aided by his trusty assistant Nikola (Charles Bolender), a hirsute mighty midget and confidant...Kingsford's Occult library is full of dusty manuscripts and antiquities...a Mandrake plant, said to be "sensitive to dark occult forces", holds a place of prominence and trembles as a warning when Kingsford is threatened by approaching evils...Kingsford's long time friends, Robert Vandenburg (Peter Mark Richman) and Evelyn Lang (Judi Meredith), are about to be married...but Robert is now seriously unwell, suffering periodic catatonic episodes with disturbing and horrific imagery experienced as a nightmare...having been called to the police station, Kingsford discovers that 4 of these strange and ugly carvings have been recovered at the murder scenes...and that Chief Misbach is now under pressure from the city fathers to stop the murders, with it's tremendous media scrutiny and a panicked populace...many of whom seek out a popular spiritualist medium, Professor Malaki (Werner Klemperer, a few months before his Hogan's Heroes gig as Colonel Klink)...Kingsford, Robert and his fiance Evelyn sit in seance with Professor Malaki...a hooded character who chooses to linger only in the shadows of his parlor...

Kingsford takes one of the ivory sculptures to his friend Chi Zang (Peter Brocco), an Alchemist in Chinatown with a profound knowledge of ancient evils...Chi Zang, presumably also a regular character had the series sold, is a kind of a Huggy-Bear type informant on the streets, ha, ha...But Chi Zang is truly alarmed, recognizing the ivory carving as depicting a shape-shifting Sumerian demon from Ancient Mesopotamia...Chi Zang somberly intones: "This is a Sumerian God...old, old...before Babylon, before Egypt...with it's demons and acolytes so cruel...merciless, evil...banished from this world, but forever struggling to return!"...and Kingsford soon discovers that every one of the victims were members of an 1860s Archaeological expedition to Mesopotamia...a country in which his friend Robert was born!

My screen caps from the TCM/Universal double feature DVD...
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Kingsford's Latin Motto..."Everything ends in Mystery"...
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Kingsford, having survived another life threatening supernatural horror, tries to relax in his office...suddenly, his Mandrake plant begins to tremble once again...he fixes his gaze upon his guardian, and jokingly remarks: "Oh shut up! No one asked your opinion"...
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It's really too bad that this series didn't sell...this pilot is quite effective with a compelling and atmospheric story scripted by Barre Lyndon (The Lodger, Hangover Square, Night has a Thousand Eyes)...Music by the great Bronislaw Kaper...needless to say, a great cast as well...and it features a tremendously well done transformation scene that is far better than many such efforts in Universal's celebrated Monster movies...Werner Klemperer, as the mysterious and shadowy Professor Malaki, is never completely recognizable under his make-up...and when the film was re-cut for the theatrical release, Producer Norman Lloyd (still with us at age 106) re-dubbed Klemperer's lines so that he's never heard either!...Producer Jack Laird would go on to producing Night Gallery and The Questor Tapes in the early 70s...and was also producer of the long running cop show Kojak with Telly Savalas...

For the anecdote, Dark Intruder had common denominators with “The Night of the Inferno” (the pilot of The Wild Wild West):
• produced the same year
• taking place during the same century
• had a complexe concept
• has a Chinese character

Producer Jack Laird will recycle the music score in two segments of Rod Serling's Night Gallery.
 

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