What did you watch this week in classic TV on DVD(or Blu)?

BobO'Link

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I *finally* finished the entire run of Columbo last night.

I enjoyed the episode with Faye Dunaway. It's possible I missed the information early in the episode but for most of it thought Dunaway and Christian's characters might be lovers. It was one of the better episodes in these final years.

I really liked the one with Patrick McGoohan as much as anything for all the dark humor. And I saw that McGoohan also directed the episode. Very enjoyable.

I wanted to like the one with Billy Connolly - and did for a short while. But I'm a classically trained musician and there were just too many musical issues for me to let them slide and ignore them. The "apprentice" and his "conducting" was so bad as to be laughable. On one occasion, Connolly's character is conducting the orchestra but you can see his shadow on the screen which is less than 5' in front of him (the one on the "big" set is easily 50' away and no way you'd see a shadow on it). When he starts the lift at the beginning of the public performance there's *no one* back stage! This is a "major" production and there's *no* stage manager!?! Absolutely ridiculous. While it was likely editing, when Connolly's character is faux conducting Tchaikovsky for Columbo the timing is so far off as to be laughable. And there was more. I really liked the premise but the technical flaws kept taking me out of the story.

The last episode was a horrible one with which to end the series. Bad music, and another of those "murder that's not a murder" story lines. An accidental death that's not reported so a shifty boyfriend can get the funding needed for his new dance club. And the former girlfriend is afraid the mob will come after for the former boyfriend's death. Columbo knowing that fish in tanks need a specific amount of water per inch of fish? Borderline ludicrous. Oh well... I'm done.

All in all, I enjoyed watching all the episodes and don't regret the purchase. I'll watch some of them again in the future, but not likely all of them.
 

Jeff Flugel

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Man in a Suitcase - 1.23 "Web with Four Spiders"
McGill (the wonderfully brooding, Method-trained Richard Bradford), finds himself manipulated and targeted by criminals, British Intelligence, and even his old cronies in the CIA, after he is hired by an arrogant lawyer (Ray McAnally) with a supposedly impeccable reputation, who is being blackmailed with photos taken during a drunken blackout. But tarnished knight McGill, battered, bruised, pushed around and generally treated with contempt by his client, the client's adoring daughter (Jacqueline Ellis), and pretty much everyone else involved in the case, soon finds out that it's not money the blackmailers are after, but something much bigger...Outstanding episode, twisty and supremely cynical, with lots of juicy dialogue (courtesy of writer Edmund Ward), delivered by a larger than usual supporting cast, which includes John Savident, Warren Stanhope, Edward Evans, David Cargill, and Simon Oates (a few years before he joined the main cast of Doomwatch). But it's Bradford's performance as McGill, world-weary but honorable, which is the shining constant in this gritty ITC gem.

The Andy Griffith Show
2.18 "Jailbreak"
3.16 "Man in a Hurry"
More soothing time spent in Mayberry. "Jailbreak" treads similar material to S1's "The Manhunt" (it even brings back Ken Lynch as another dismissive big city detective), but is even more comically inspired, including as it does Barney's hilarious attempt at disguising himself as a criminal and sharing a jail cell with infamous robber "Doc" Malloy (Allen Melvin) to glean information on the man's partner. There's also a fun car chase finale, in which the supposed "country bumpkin" sheriff and deputy save the day.

No need to say much about the genius piece of work that is "Man in a Hurry"...others, including Russ and Randall, have waxed lyrical upon this episode before. Suffice it to say that it remains one of the finest half-hours of television I've ever seen, and I never get tired of watching it. The sponsor tags at the end of these episodes are a treat, too...I find Kellogg's cereal and Sanka coffee better fits for the denizens of Mayberry than seeing Jed and Granny from The Beverly Hillbillies puffing on Winston cigarettes.




The Six Million Dollar Man - 2.5 "The Seven Million Dollar Man"
This episode makes most 6MDM fans' top five lists, and it's easy to see why: a great premise, a good script and a fine guest star turn by Monte Markham. Steve Austin learns that - unbeknownst to him - Oscar Goldman has another bionic man waiting in the wings, to take over missions if something happens to Steve. The trouble is that the man chosen, former champion race car driver Barney Miller (Markham), is not taking his conversion into a cyborg at all well, and sets out to destroy the OSI's cybernetic program. It's up to our humble main man Steve to stop him, and the final bionic throwdown is a doozy. Markham returned in S3's "The Bionic Criminal," with his character's name changed to "Barney Hiller," for obvious reasons.

The Hardy Boys Nancy Drew Mysteries
1.12 "The Mystery of the Ghostwriter's Cruise"
Nancy and George accompany a famous, surly mystery writer (David Wayne) on a cruise, and it soon becomes apparent that someone is out to kill him. No great shakes as a mystery, but relaxing fun, and the viewer is treated to a constant parade of Pamela Sue Martin changing from one sexy outfit to another. All three seasons are available on YouTube, but who knows for how long?



Star Trek - 2.23 "The Omega Glory"
Kirk, Spock, McCoy and the usual dead meat regulation "red shirt" beam aboard the derelict U.S.S. Exeter, only to find that nearly the entire crew has died of some hideous infection. Forced to beam down to the planet, whose inhabitants are immune to the disease, Kirk and crew are horrified to discover the Exeter's lone survivor, Captain Tracey (Morgan Woodward) has broken the Prime Directive and taken sides in a generations-long war...

It's been a while since I've given The Original Series a spin, and it was fun to get reacquainted with this show, my favorite of all the Trek incarnations. I've always had a soft spot for this episode, despite its ridiculous and predictable final reveal. The set-up is interesting, the action is good, and we get another memorable Star Fleet officer gone rogue here, in the menacing presence of Morgan Woodward. Happily, costume designer extraordinaire William Theiss continued to buck the 1960s "no belly button" edict in his wardrobe choices for the supporting actresses who briefly appear here.

Strange Report
- 1.13 "X-Ray: Who Weeps for the Doctor"
When a highly-skilled but greatly disliked young surgeon (David Collings) seemingly commits suicide, Strange and his assistant Ham (Kaz Garras) investigate, and find that there is much more to the case than at first appears. Another serious, well-structured story, quite different from the usual ITC glam, globe-trotting adventure norm, anchored by the low-key but commanding presence of Anthony Quayle as the compassionate, gentlemanly Adam Strange. And, of course, there's the added bonus of sunny, super cute Anneke Wills sporting a variety of Carnaby Street fashions. Directed by Charles Crichton, and also starring Trisha Mortimer, Nicholas Selby, Annabelle Lee and John Laurie (Private Frazier from Dad's Army). Richard Carpenter has a brief bit as another surgeon; he would later move on from acting and become a successful writer, creating the cult TV series Catweazle, The Ghosts of Motley Hall, Dick Turpin and Robin of Sherwood.



Rawhide
- 1.3 "Incident with an Executioner"
Dan Duryea guest stars as a notorious killer-for-hire stalking the passengers of a wrecked stagecoach who are riding along with the drovers. Of course, tough-as-nails trail boss Gil Favor sorts him out in the end. Per usual, lots of great outdoor location work and some eerie atmosphere, as all the rescued passengers are twitchy and nervous, not knowing who is Duryea's target. The reveal of the killer's twisted motivation adds a weird, dark touch to the final showdown. Besides Duryea, the exceptional supporting cast includes James Drury, Martin Milner, William Schallert, Jan Shepard (in her first of three appearances in the series), and bosomy former '40s starlet, Marguerite Chapman.

F Troop - 1.6 "Dirge for the Scourge"
Captain Parmenter's efforts to clean up a local saloon (run, naturally, by O'Rourke Enterprises) result in his incurring the wrath of gunfighter Sam Urp (played by Jack Elam), so O'Rourke and Agarn have to scramble to save their pigeon-in-chief's life. Lots of broad laughs here, with Urp's clumsiness with saloon doors the highlight. Elam makes any production he appears in better, and this is no exception.

 
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JohnHopper

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The Six Million Dollar Man - 2.5 "The Seven Million Dollar Man"
This episode makes most 6MDM fans' top five lists, and it's easy to see why: a great premise, a good script and a fine guest star turn by Monte Markham. Steve Austin finds out that - unbeknownst to him - Oscar Goldman has another bionic man waiting in the wings, to take over missions if something happens to Steve. The trouble is that the man chosen, former champion race car driver Barney Miller (Markham), is not taking his conversion into a cyborg at all well, and sets out to destroy the OSI's cybernetic program. It's up to our humble main man Steve to stop him, and the final bionic throwdown is a doozy. Markham returned in S3's "The Bionic Criminal," with his character's name changed to "Barney Hiller," for obvious reasons.
It's wild, Steve, It's wild.”
—Barney Miller.

One of the greatest episodes ever along with “Population: Zero”, “The Pioneers”, “Return of the Robot Maker”, “The Midas Touch”, “Stranger in Broken Fork”. The theme music of Barney Miller is filled with saturated acid electric guitar.​
 

Flashgear

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Man in a Suitcase - 1.23 "Web with Four Spiders"
McGill (the wonderfully mercurial, Method-trained Richard Bradford), finds himself manipulated and targeted by criminals, British Intelligence, and even his old cronies in the CIA, after he is hired by an arrogant lawyer (Ray McNally) with a supposedly impeccable reputation, who is being blackmailed by photos taken during a drunken blackout. But tarnished knight McGill, battered, bruised, pushed around and generally treated with contempt by his client, the client's adoring daughter (Jacqueline Ellis), and pretty much everyone else involved in the case, soon finds out that its not money the blackmailers are after, but something much bigger...Outstanding episode, twisty and supremely cynical, with lots of juicy dialogue (courtesy of writer Edmund Ward), delivered by a larger than usual supporting cast, which includes John Savident, Warren Stanhope, Edward Evans, David Cargill, and Simon Oates (a few years before he joined the main cast of Doomwatch). But it's Bradford's performance as McGill, world-weary but honorable, which is the shining constant in this gritty ITC gem.
Jeff, your description of this series and episode reviews of Man in a Suitcase makes me want to get the series, especially in those magnificent Blu-rays, ASAP! I've seen the Network promo videos that you have posted, and "McGill" sounds like a "Harry Palmer", "John Drake", "Alec Leamas", and "George Smiley" all wrapped into one character, although perhaps more emotive than some of those other characters who maintain a buttoned-downed and grim resolve as a suit of armor, until they explode. Making their violence all the more shocking and effective.

Strange Report - 1.13 "X-Ray: Who Weeps for the Doctor"
When a highly-skilled but greatly disliked young surgeon (David Collings) seemingly commits suicide, Strange and his assistant Ham (Kaz Garras) investigate, and find that there is much more to the case than at first appears. Another serious, well-structured story, quite different from the usual ITC glam, globe-trotting adventure norm, anchored by the low-key but commanding presence of Anthony Quayle as the compassionate, gentlemanly Adam Strange. And, of course, there's the added bonus of sunny, super cute Anneke Wills sporting a variety of Carnaby Street fashions. Directed by Charles Crichton, and also starring Trisha Mortimer, Nicholas Selby, Annabelle Lee and John Laurie (Private Frazier from Dad's Army). Richard Carpenter has a brief bit as another surgeon; he would later move on from acting and become a successful writer, creating the cult TV series Catweazle, The Ghosts of Motley Hall, Dick Turpin and Robin of Sherwood.
I'm a big fan of Anthony Quayle as well (my Film Movement Blu-ray box set of British War films including Ice Cold in Alex being delayed by the current crisis). Strange Report is another one you have peaked our interest for. And your mention of gorgeous British "birds" in form-fitting couture and mini-skirts enhances my interest.

The Hardy Boys Nancy Drew Mysteries
1.12 "The Mystery of the Ghostwriter's Cruise"
Nancy and George accompany a famous, surly mystery writer (David Wayne) on a cruise, and it soon becomes apparent that someone is out to kill him. No great shakes as a mystery, but typically relaxing fun, and the viewer is treated to a constant parade of Pamela Sue Martin changing from one sexy outfit to another. All three seasons are available on YouTube, but who knows for how long?

Thanks for letting us know this series is on Youtube! It's a show I never watched back in the day, as TV itself wasn't available in the many hell-holes I was forced to inhabit in the late '70s. Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries is very affordable on disc, and thus I have considered getting it on DVD, but perhaps I should view several on Youtube first. Other than the lovely Pamela Sue Martin (who I understand left the series before the end), I have zero interest in the two other guys playing the leads. But in looking up the impressive guest stars on IMDB, many old favorites and big names among them, I'm tempted for them alone! I fully expect the series to be a Disco era artifact, with all the attendant irritants of youth oriented programming. But perhaps It's good escapism as well.

It's been a while since I've given The Original Series a spin, and it was fun to get reacquainted with this show, my favorite of all the Trek incarnations. I've always had a soft spot for this episode, despite its ridiculous and predictable final reveal. The set-up is interesting, the action is good, and we get another memorable Star Fleet officer gone rogue here, in the menacing presence of Morgan Woodward. Happily, costume designer extraordinaire William Theiss continued to buck the 1960s "no belly button" edict in his wardrobe choices for the supporting actresses who briefly appear here.
The original Star Trek is so famous and much talked about, being obsessed over for decades among baby-boomer fandom, that this series has almost merged into the wallpaper of my classic TV viewing. I watched it first run and loved it back in the day, still consider the original to be the only Trek series for me (though I have seen all or parts of the successor Trek spin-offs of varying attraction). I have the whole original Trek on Blu-ray, having previously collected it on DVD and video. Funny that I almost need a reminder to dig it out again, that's what I mean by "wallpaper". Same thing with Twilight Zone, even The Outer Limits, which I only re-watched in the last few years because of KL's splendid Blu-ray reissue. There are a lot of classic TV collectors who ONLY collect Science Fiction, Horror and Fantasy shows. When you have a much broader selection of genres, like Westerns, Cop/Detective, War/Espionage, Contemporary Dramas, Cartoon/Animated and Sit-Coms, I find I sometimes need a reminder to dive back into the SF wallpaper of my youth. Morgan Woodward is a favorite, especially in Westerns like Gunsmoke, where he guest starred in 18 episodes alone!

Rawhide - 1.3 "Incident with an Executioner"
Dan Duryea guest stars as a notorious killer-for-hire stalking the passengers of a wrecked stagecoach who are riding along with the drovers. Of course, tough-as-nails trail boss Gil Favor sorts him out in the end. Per usual, lots of great outdoor location work and some eerie atmosphere, as all the rescued passengers are twitchy and nervous, not knowing who is Duryea's target. The reveal of the killer's twisted motivation adds a weird, dark touch to the final showdown. Besides Duryea, the exceptional supporting cast includes James Drury, Martin Milner, William Schallert, Jan Shepard (in her first of three appearances in the series), and bosomy former '40s starlet, Marguerite Chapman.
Great episode with a typical strong cast! Rawhide got off to such a strong start (and maintaining that excellence for most of it's run). Of the 23 episodes in that first season's run, as a mid-season replacement and being a show that CBS didn't even know if they wanted, there are many greats (Alabaster Plain, Executioner, West of Lano, Dog Days, Judas Trap, No Man's Land, Misplaced Indians, Roman Candles, etc.). Then you've got all the great guest stars... Mark Richman, Martin Balsam, Dan Duryea, Brian Donleavy, Martha Hyer, Margaret O'Brien, MacDonald Carey, Rick Jason, Mercedes McCambridge, Whitney Blake, Brian Keith, Shirley Knight, Gerald Mohr, Phyllis Coates, Beverly Garland etc. Even the much fewer ordinary episodes are an hour well spent. You discover that Eric Fleming, as a self-trained actor, was a tower of power, a tremendous presence on this show. And you begin to see the stuff that Clint Eastwood would turn into his Oscar winning and outstanding career to come, as with Incident of the Misplaced Indians. Even Sheb Wooley gets a chance to shine in Incident of the Roman Candles.

Eric Fleming and Clint Eastwood in Incident at Alabaster Plain (Jan.16, 1959)...
Rawhide 11.JPG

Rawhide 12.JPG



The Andy Griffith Show
2.18 "Jailbreak"
3.16 "Man in a Hurry"
More soothing time spent in Mayberry. "Jailbreak" treads similar material to S1's "The Manhunt" (it even brings back Ken Lynch as another dismissive big city detective), but is even more comically inspired, including as it does Barney's hilarious attempt at disguising himself as a criminal and sharing a jail cell with infamous robber "Doc" Malloy (Allen Melvin) to glean information on the man's partner. There's also a fun car chase finale, in which the supposed "country bumpkin" sheriff and deputy save the day.

No need to say much about the genius piece of work that is "Man in a Hurry"...others, including Russ and Randall, have waxed lyrical upon this episode before. Suffice it to say that it remains one of the finest half-hours of television I've ever seen, and I never get tired of watching it. The sponsor tags at the end of these episodes are a treat, too...I find Kellogg's cereal and Sanka coffee better fits for the denizens of Mayberry than seeing Jed and Granny from The Beverly Hillbillies puffing on Winston cigarettes.

Wonderful stuff, Jeff! A visit to The Andy Griffith Show and the funny and sweet people of Mayberry would be among the best escapes for our troubled times...reliably funny and uplifting, and often inspiring in profound ways, as with Man in a Hurry, which is a real touchstone...for us baby boomers who grew up on The Andy Griffith Show, whether first run, decades of re-runs or the home video age, these images hold great import and profound meaning...
AAA Andy Griffith 6.JPG

AAA Andy Griffith 5.JPG

AAA Andy Griffith 8.JPG

AAA Andy Griffith 4.JPG

AAA Andy Griffith 1.JPG

AAA Andy Griffith 2.JPG
 

Jeff Flugel

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Barney: You know what I think I'm gonna do?

Andy: What?

Barney: I'm gonna go home, have me a little nap, then go over to Thelma Lou's and watch a little TV... Yeah, I believe that's what I'll do. Go home, have a nap, then over to Thelma Lou's for TV... Yep, that's the plan, go home, little nap...

Malcolm Tucker: For the love of Mike, do it! Do it! JUST DO IT!

Great episode! :)
 

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There are a lot of classic TV collectors who ONLY collect Science Fiction, Horror and Fantasy shows. When you have a much broader selection of genres, like Westerns, Cop/Detective, War/Espionage, Contemporary Dramas, Cartoon/Animated and Sit-Coms, I find I sometimes need a reminder to dive back into the SF wallpaper of my youth.
____________________
Good topic and good observation.
As a collector, I'm only focused on dramatical series from the Silver Age whatever the genres.
Apart from the sci-fi crowd, you omit to mention the western crowd.​
 

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_________________________________________
I'm currently riding through the second disc of Gunsmoke season 18!
The series impresses me for the wide array of guest actors and recurring character-actors.​
 

Jeff Flugel

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Jeff, your description of this series and episode reviews of Man in a Suitcase makes me want to get the series, especially in those magnificent Blu-rays, ASAP!
I'm a big fan of Anthony Quayle as well (my Film Movement Blu-ray box set of British War films including Ice Cold in Alex being delayed by the current crisis). Strange Report is another one you have peaked our interest for. And your mention of gorgeous British "birds" in form-fitting couture and mini-skirts enhances my interest.
Thanks for all the comments, Randall! I can't recommend these two series highly enough. Man in a Suitcase is a very strong series, and looks stunning remastered on Blu-Ray. Strange Report is DVD only, but looks great, too...I'd say on a par with the top tier CBS / Paramount releases.

Other than the lovely Pamela Sue Martin (who I understand left the series before the end), I have zero interest in the two other guys playing the leads. But in looking up the impressive guest stars on IMDB, many old favorites and big names among them, I'm tempted for them alone! I fully expect the series to be a Disco era artifact, with all the attendant irritants of youth oriented programming. But perhaps It's good escapism as well.
Yes, I'd recommend checking a few out on YouTube first. I have some nostalgia for this series that you understandably don't, Randall, but I do think you might find some enjoyment in this very '70s but fun take on the classic characters...especially the Pamela Sue Martin Nancy Drew episodes. The Hardy Boys episodes, at least in the first year, are not bad, either...especially the ones where Shaun Cassidy isn't allowed to sing. ;) I recommend the following episodes, which feature either atmospheric little mysteries and/or good supporting casts:

Nancy Drew:

"Mystery of the Pirate's Cove" (with Monte Markham)
"The Secret of the Whispering Walls
"A Haunting We Will Go" (with Carl Betz, Pippa Scott, Dina Merrill, Bob Crane and Victor Buono)

The Hardy Boys:

"The Mystery of Witches' Hollow"
"The Disappearing Floor"

...plus S2's tag-team two-parter, "The Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew Meet Dracula" (with Lorne Greene and Paul Williams), a bit padded but quite atmospheric in places.

Great episode with a typical strong cast! Rawhide got off to such a strong start (and maintaining that excellence for most of it's run). Of the 23 episodes in that first season's run, as a mid-season replacement and being a show that CBS didn't even know if they wanted, there are many greats (Alabaster Plain, Executioner, West of Lano, Dog Days, Judas Trap, No Man's Land, Misplaced Indians, Roman Candles, etc.). Then you've got all the great guest stars... Mark Richman, Martin Balsam, Dan Duryea, Brian Donlevy, Martha Hyer, Margaret O'Brien, MacDonald Carey, Rick Jason, Mercedes McCambridge, Whitney Blake, Brian Keith, Shirley Knight, Gerald Mohr, Phyllis Coates, Beverly Garland etc. Even the much fewer ordinary episodes are an hour well spent. You discover that Eric Fleming, as a self-trained actor, was a tower of power, a tremendous presence on this show. And you begin to see the stuff that Clint Eastwood would turn into his Oscar winning and outstanding career to come, as with Incident of the Misplaced Indians. Even Sheb Wooley gets a chance to shine in Incident of the Roman Candles.
Eric Fleming has been a revelation for me in this series...he's just great, an authoritative, rugged screen presence, and he comes across like an authentic cowboy. The whole cast of drovers seems authentic, really. I watched another good one from S1 today, "Incident of the Curious Street," with Mercedes McCambridge and Whitney Blake. I have the first three seasons of the show, the ones overseen by Charles Marquis Warren, and look forward to digging further into them.
 
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Jeff Flugel

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It's wild, Steve, It's wild.”
—Barney Miller.

One of the greatest episodes ever along with “Population: Zero”, “The Pioneers”, “Return of the Robot Maker”, “The Midas Touch”, “Stranger in Broken Fork”. The theme music of Barney Miller is filled with saturated acid electric guitar.​
Agreed, John...the music is ultra funky in this, and many other, 6MDM episodes. Hopefully some enterprising company (LaLaLand Records, maybe?) will release a proper soundtrack on CD someday.
 
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So, I've been spending my stay-in-place time re-watching Route 66 episodes on Prime. I'm finding the more comedic storylines have grown to be my favorite, although Lance of Straw (S1E2)--certainly not a "fun" episode--is well worth it just for the appearance of Janice Rule, who is the most unbelievably gorgeous shrimp boat captain that ever existed. Ann Helm in The Clover Throne (S1E15) runs a close second as the very correctly dubbed 'Sweet Thing' who just oozes lust from every pore.
Stirling Silliphant, who writes most of the shows, must turn himself inside out in creating such esoteric dialog between Tod and Buzz that no 20-something year old would ever be able to express in real life. God knows I never talked like that--my most poetic prattle generally started out with "Will ya look at that chick..."

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upload_2020-4-1_10-11-54.jpeg

A shrimp boat captain and a most assuredly Sweet Thing; and Patty McCormack, who was just beginning to fill out nicely...

Sleep on Four Pillows
is a fun one with a very young Patty McCormack who hoodwinks Tod and Buzz into thinking she's in the mafia. What's most interesting in the episode is the concept of computers via 1961-- the size of Buick Roadmasters with about as much storage data as fits on a business card.
They're all great episodes, always made a bit better while sipping a straight up vodka martini.
 
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The Hardy Boys:
"The Mystery of Witches' Hollow"
"The Disappearing Floor"
"The Disappearing Floor (Number 19 in the Franklin W. Dixon series--1940) was one of my favorite Hardy Boy books, to which the TV version was about as akin to as I am to a rhinoceros. But then, who's paying attention?

upload_2020-4-1_10-37-33.jpeg
upload_2020-4-1_10-37-57.jpeg

Just loved the book jackets and cover page illustrations. Jeez...what a simpler time.
 

Jeff Flugel

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"The Disappearing Floor (Number 19 in the Franklin W. Dixon series--1940) was one of my favorite Hardy Boy books, to which the TV version was about as akin to as I am to a rhinoceros. But then, who's paying attention?

View attachment 70534 View attachment 70535
Just loved the book jackets and cover page illustrations. Jeez...what a simpler time.
Hey Russ! Oh, yeah, the 70s TV show bears only the merest wisp of a resemblance to the original book series...but it's fun enough if taken on its own terms. One thing I do really like about the show is how it incorporates the stars into the classic hardback cover illustrations during the atmospheric opening credits:

 

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Barney: You know what I think I'm gonna do?

Andy: What?

Barney: I'm gonna go home, have me a little nap, then go over to Thelma Lou's and watch a little TV... Yeah, I believe that's what I'll do. Go home, have a nap, then over to Thelma Lou's for TV... Yep, that's the plan, go home, little nap...

Malcolm Tucker: For the love of Mike, do it! Do it! JUST DO IT!

Great episode! :)
I always wanted Andy to say something along the lines of "Well... you know, Barney... there's a couch right inside... you *could* just go lay down on *it* a while... it'd save us all a lot of worry... and, after all, Thelma Lou'll keep..." without missing a lick on the guitar.
 
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BobO'Link

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...I find Kellogg's cereal and Sanka coffee better fits for the denizens of Mayberry than seeing Jed and Granny from The Beverly Hillbillies puffing on Winston cigarettes.
If it makes you feel better... all us kids thought Jed and Granny puffing on a smoke was just weird. They never did it in the show so why now? The Kellogg's tags with Jethro were far superior to those Winston ones...
F Troop - 1.6 "Dirge for the Scourge"
Captain Parmenter's efforts to clean up a local saloon (run, naturally, by O'Rourke Enterprises) result in his incurring the wrath of gunfighter Sam Urp (played by Jack Elam), so O'Rourke and Agarn have to scramble to save their pigeon-in-chief's life. Lots of broad laughs here, with Urp's clumsiness with saloon doors the highlight. Elam makes any production he appears in better, and this is no exception.

I, too, like it when Elam shows up in a show. He's quite a character. Your description and that photo makes me want to get out my copy of F-Troop for another viewing. It was a favorite back than and I still like it quite a lot.
 

BobO'Link

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So, I've been spending my stay-in-place time re-watching Route 66 episodes on Prime. I'm finding the more comedic storylines have grown to be my favorite, although Lance of Straw (S1E2)--certainly not a "fun" episode--is well worth it it for just the appearance of Janice Rule who is the most unbelievably gorgeous shrimp boat captain that ever existed. Ann Helm in The Clover Throne (S1E15) runs a close second as the very correctly dubbed 'Sweet Thing' who just oozes lust from every pore.
Stirling Silliphant, who writes most of the shows, must turn himself inside out in creating such esoteric dialog between Tod and Buzz that no 20-something year old would ever be able to express in real life. God knows I never talked like that--my most poetic prattle generally started out with "Will ya look at that chick..."

View attachment 70532 View attachment 70533

A shrimp boat captain and a most assuredly Sweet Thing; and Patty McCormack, who was just beginning to fill out nicely...

Sleep on Four Pillows
is a fun one with a very young Patty McCormack who hoodwinks Tod and Buzz into thinking she's in the mafia. What's most interesting in the episode is the concept of computers via 1961-- the size of Buick Roadmasters with about as much storage data as fits on a business card.
They're all great episodes, always made a bit better while sipping a straight up vodka martini.
I've been racking my brain trying to figure out just where I know Patty McCormack from... I finally resorted to a Google search.

It's from the Three's Company spin-off show - The Ropers:







She's the primary reason I watched that one...
 

Purple Wig

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Matlock: S3EP16 "The Thoroughbred". A later period work from director Leo Penn, who was behind many classic 60s TV dramas. Guest starring a cowichan sweater clad Claude Akins, and Lonny Chapman, who probably occupies more screen time in this episode than the last 3 westerns I saw him in combined.

and not classic TV, though could qualify on a technicality, just caught "Smokey And The Bandit 2" on cable. Starring Dan August, Gidget, Tarzan, Ralph Kramden, and Stanley Belmont, with a screenplay by Jerry Belson ("The Dick Van Dyke Show", "Hey Landlord") who is probably responsible for some genuinely clever lines amongst the shenanigans. With a surprise (to me anyway) appearance by John Anderson, somehow looking 15 years younger in 1979 than he did in any TV western (though just as menacing).
 

Rustifer

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I've been racking my brain trying to figure out just where I know Patty McCormack from... I finally resorted to a Google search.

It's from the Three's Company spin-off show - The Ropers:







She's the primary reason I watched that one...
Yeah, me too Howie. She was in full bloom by then. In a sweater, she had my interest as much as porterhouse steaks in a good butcher shop.
 

Purple Wig

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I've been racking my brain trying to figure out just where I know Patty McCormack from... I finally resorted to a Google search.

It's from the Three's Company spin-off show - The Ropers:







She's the primary reason I watched that one...
Mini Skirt Mob is worth checking out as far as Patty McCormack vehicles.
 

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Hey Russ! Oh, yeah, the 70s TV show bears only the merest wisp of a resemblance to the original book series...but it's fun enough if taken on its own terms. One thing I do really like about the show is how it incorporates the stars into the classic hardback cover illustrations during the atmospheric opening credits:

The exception is the S1 episode "The Mystery of Witches Hollow" which is actually a faithful adaptation of Book #41 in the series "Clue Of The Screeching Owl" and is the only episode to prominently feature the character of Chet Morton from the books. The Chet character had just a brief appearance in one more episode and then the actor doing the role, Gary Springer, left the series to take a part in "Jaws 2".
 

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