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What did you watch this week in classic TV on DVD(or Blu)?

Discussion in 'TV on DVD and Blu-ray' started by Bryan^H, Aug 28, 2015.

  1. Message #3181 of 3622 Dec 9, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019
    Rustifer

    Rustifer Screenwriter
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    Episode Commentary
    Leave It To Beaver
    "Beaver Won't Eat" (S4E1)

    I'd like to rename this episode "Beaver's Cruciferous Crisis" because, unlike the actual title suggests, Beaver has no problem actually eating. In fact, his plate is as clean as a nun's conscience save for eight little green brussel sprouts. Even in black and white TV, you can sense how green they are. And probably cold too, now that they've been sitting untouched for so long. A cold congealed sprout is a fearsome thing. It practically shouts "Eat me and you'll have noxious gas for the next five days!"

    Beaver nervously spreads the sprouts around into various geometric shapes while mom June (Barbara Billingsley) exhorts him to eat the damn things or else. Eventually they find their way into his shirt pocket, which is the only sensible place to hide sprouts. It doesn't work. June's sharp eyes immediately spot the deception. Her anger irrationally shifts to Ward (Hugh Beaumont) for not belting the kid over his poor eating habits. The whole affair is rapidly turning into a family cruciferous crisis.

    Ward has been lax because deep down inside he's not a sprout fan either. "Dear, aren't you making a mountain out of a brussel sprout?" he meekly points out. June shoots him a withering look as if to suggest that their sex life might rapidly be coming to a long dry spell.
    Beaver is forced to sit alone at the table until he chokes down his veggies. If no eating brussel sprouts, then he can't join the family for dinner and the football game the following evening. It takes the devious mind of Eddie Haskell (Ken Osmond) to furnish a scheme for Beaver. "Just sit around and look sad until you parents give in and offer you a deal." Taking advice from Eddie is akin to asking an arsonist how to work a fire extinguisher.
    Surprisingly, a compromise is worked out and a deal is reached. Beaver has promised to eat brussel sprouts the next time they're served.

    upload_2019-12-9_9-34-23. upload_2019-12-9_9-34-44. upload_2019-12-9_9-35-13.
    Beaver creates a sprout montage; Eddie dispenses advice; Ward learns of impending lonely nights...

    Cut to the fancy restaurant the following night. Beaver is served a plate of roast beef, mashed potatoes and--you guessed it--brussel sprouts. He tries one and actually likes it, which proves the point that restaurants can cook brussel sprouts better than any mom.*

    Notes:
    I didn't eat brussel sprouts until I was around 40 years old. Maybe my palate had changed, or maybe as an adult I just started to pay attention to how good cruciferous vegetables were for one. But to this day, you still can't make me eat a cold one.

    In the restaurant scene, Beaver's brussel sprout crisis is overseen by the manager, played by Hal Smith--better known as Mayberry's friendly drunk Otis Campbell:

    upload_2019-12-9_9-35-42.

    I've got to hand it to show creators Bob Mosher and Joe Connelly to come up with a very funny premise around something so simple as brussel sprouts.

    *After dinner, the family heads to the football stadium to watch Clemson beat the pants off Alabama.
     
  2. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

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    I really enjoyed Happy Days until around S4 when it transitioned to The Fonzie and Richie Show. It was still enjoyable enough but nowhere as good as those first 2 seasons. When I saw Fonzie literally jump the shark in the S5 premier I swore off it and never looked back (well... other than I worked for an ABC affiliate, on the evening shift, and, if I wasn't busy doing production, sometimes had no choice). I own copies of S1-4 and that's all I'll ever own of that one.

    How are you watching The Ghost and Mrs. Muir? That's one of those missing shows I'd like to see get a release. I always liked it much better than the movie upon which it's based.
     
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  3. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

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    When I was Beaver's age I'd have had the same reaction to brussel sprouts. Fortunately, my mom didn't know what they were (we *did* have cooked cabbage in several incarnations - my favorite being traditional Polish cabbage rolls). I first had them as an adult, thinking they'd be just like tiny cabbages, only to find out they aren't - not exactly.

    I *do* like them, mainly if hot, and boiled until just tender, served lightly salted and peppered. My wife doesn't like them at all and has tried several different preparation methods/recipes - none of which my daughter (the only other person I know who'll eat them) and I like. She's purchased several frozen packages of various preparations, all of which, IMHO, are just not that good (most try to hide the flavor with heavy butter or cheese sauce or garlic or other heavy flavors).

    Have you ever seen the plant? It looks like something from a SF movie:
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

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    Yeah, I may pick up the first 2 seasons at some point...the show's down my "Want" list considerably, but I am finding I do really like these early episodes, and the sets are still cheap, so they'll likely make it into my collection eventually.

    From what I can tell, they're all on YouTube, Howie, and they look complete and uncut (probably sourced from the Region 4 DVDs).

     
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  5. bmasters9

    bmasters9 Producer

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    Maybe he just didn't like how they were made (restaurant preparation, vs. his mother).
     
  6. Rustifer

    Rustifer Screenwriter
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    My mother and grandparents were Romanian--stuffed cabbage rolls and cottage cheese dumplings were a staple for us. To this day, I kick myself for not getting those exact recipes. I'd blindly crawl through a field of cheeseburgers just to be able to taste that dish again.
     
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  7. Rustifer

    Rustifer Screenwriter
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    Episode Commentary
    Peter Gunn
    "Murder On The Line" (S3E38)

    Peter (Craig Stevens) and Edie (Lola Albright) are making dinner and making out. Sanitation be damned. He's stirring the salad and she's stirring his loins (too easy, I know). They're interrupted by the arrival of Arthur McCutchen (Gordon Oliver) who shoves $1,000 cash into Pete's oil and vinegary hands. He's been hired to visit McCutchen's employer Cesar Carlyle (Robert Gist)--an eccentric billionaire who lives in a spooky mansion. Carlyle, who looks eerily like Austin Power's Dr. Evil, is as deaf as a towel rack and can only communicate by special phone.

    He explains to Peter that he's being blackmailed by a woman--Marin Woods--who has stolen certain documents and is demanding $1 million for them to be returned. It's up to Peter to find those documents which apparently are rather damning in their content. As timing would have it, Marin is throwing a party that evening. Peter crashes it and spends his time searching her apartment only to find Marin strangled to death.

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    You gonna eat that salad or...; Craig Stevens misses his appointment with the makeup chair; Peter finally gets his new mail order gun

    Before the police can get involved, Peter doubles back to McCutchen's only to find him dead as well. Everybody with any information is kaput--except Mr. Carlyle. Who was in cahoots with who? Who was the actual blackmailer? Things need to get wrapped up quickly as there's only about 23 minutes run time in the show. More importantly, did Peter ever get back to Edie and his love salad? Too bad, time ran out before we could find out.

    Notes:
    Everyone knows that the throbbing Peter Gunn music score was composed by Henry Mancini. But few know that famed movie theme composer John Williams provided most of the improvised jazz solos. Because of the scant sets on the series, I'm guessing most of the show's budget went to those two guys.
     
  8. Doug Wallen

    Doug Wallen Lead Actor

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    Tis the Holiday Season. Since I have retired I seem to have more time to view "classic" series. This list covers the first 10 days of December.

    The Dick Van Show - Complete series blu-ray
    Father Of The Week (1.22) Classic slapstick/pantomimein Richie's class.

    One Angry Man (1.24) Dabbs Greer, Sue Ane Langdon, Herb Vigran, Herbie Fay, Lee Bergere. A Mason/Berger courtroom parody.

    I Am My Brother's Keeper/The Sleeping Brother (1.26, 1.27) Jerry Van Dyke. What an introduction to somnambulism and the great Stacy (Burford) Petrie.

    The Return of Happy Spangler (1.30) Jay C. Flippen. Rob encounters his old boss and hires him. Great slapstick in final act.

    The Alan Brady Show Presents (3.13) Getting into the holiday spirit.

    JAG - Complete Season 1
    A New Life (1.1, 1.2) Terry O'Quinn. Great introduction to Harmon Rabb and the premise of the series.

    Shadow (1.3) Rex Linn, Ryan Hurst, Tracey Needham. Submarine adventure with a computer nerd who holds the sub hostage.

    Desert Son (1.4) Charles Hallahan, Neal McDonough. A privileged son is drunk and causes friendly fire.

    Hawaii Five-O - Complete 1st Season
    Once Upon A Time Part 1/Part 2 (1.19, 1.20) Joanne Linville, Nancy Malone, David Sheiner, William Schallert, Beah Richards. McGarrett's sister is taken in by a faith healer and pays for worthless medical equipment and tragedy still strikes. McGarrett wants to bring the Dr. to justice.

    Cocoon (1.0) Khigh Deigh, Andrew Duggan, Leslie Nielsen, Tim McIntyre. Red Chinese agent Wo Fat's first appearance on the islands. McGarrett goes undercover to foil the plot.

    Full Fathom Five (1.1) Kevin McCarthy. A womanizing serial killer travels the love boat targeting rich women as his victims. McGarrett sends a policewoman undercover as a potential target.

    Strangers In Our Own Land (1.2) Milton Selzer, Simon Oakland. A land developer and a progressive politician (childhood friends) grow up and become adversaries. Murder ensues.

    Have Gun - Will Travel - Complete Series
    First, Catch A Tiger (3.1) John Anderson. Paladin has a target on his back and heads to meet it head on. Nice tense episode.

    Episode In Laredo (3.2) Gene Lyons, Norma Crane, J. Pat O'Malley. Paladin aids a hired killer reform.

    Les Girls (3.3) Mabel Albertson. A lady is transporting three "brides" to the northwest with Paladin as guard.

    The Posse (3.4) Perry Cook, Denver Pyle, Harry Carey Jr. Paladin befriends a drifter who sets up Paladin for murders he committed. Best episode on this disc.

    Shot By Request (3.5) John Abbott, Malcolm Atterbury, Sue Randall. An aging gunfighter requires Paladin's help to retire.

    Pancho (3.6) Edward Colmans, Rafael Campos. Standard Romeo/Juliet storyline that involves Pancho Villa. Not very interestin.

    Seven Days - Complete Series
    The Football (2.1)
    Pinball Wizard (2.2)
    Parker.com (2.3)
    For The Children (2.4)
    Two Weddings and a Funeral (2.5)
    More time hopping adventures with Mr. Parker.

    Zorro - The Complete Season 1
    The New Commandante (1.24)
    The Fox and the Coyote (1.25)
    Adios, Senor Magistrado (1.26)
    The Eagle's Brood (1.27)
    Zorro By Proxy (1.28)
    Quintana Makes A Choice (1.29)
    Zorro Lights A Fuse (1.30)
    The Man With A Whip (1.31)
    Zorro continues his ongoing quest to find the leader of the feather cult.

    Perry Mason - Seasons 7-9
    The Case of the Missing Button (8.1) Julie Adams, Ed Nelson, Dee Hartford, Anthony Eisley, Dee Hartford, Otto Kruger. A child custody case.

    The Case of the Paper Bullets (8.2) Richard Anderson, Lynn Loring, Ford Rainey, Frank Marth, Patrick McVey. Politics and land speculation and murder.

    The Case of the Scandalous Sculpture (8.3) June Lockhart, Sean McClory, Sue Ane Langdon. Blackmail and blackmail schemes end in murder.

    The Case of the Sleepy Slayer (8.4) Hugh Marlowe, Phyllis Hill, Robert Brown Gigi Perreau, John Napier, Karl Swenson. When is murder not murder?

    The High Chaparral - Season 4
    An Anger Greater Than Mine (4.1) Alejandro Rey, Valentin de Vargas, Frank Silvera. A prisoner is released and wishes revenge on the Montoya's that includes the Chaparral.

    Spokes (4.2) William Conrad. Buck stands up to the town bully.

    Only The Bad Come to Sonora (4.3) Bruce Dern. Mano loses face with his father and goes on a quest to recover a stolen horse and his dignity.

    Wind (4.4) Rudy Ramos, R. G. Armstrong, Scott Brady. Big John wants to beat the Texans on a huge cattle drive amidst a possible Apache uprising. Help is provided by a half breed Pawnee (new character Wind).

    A Matter of Survival (4.5) Barry Sullivan. An episode involving and Indian attack that leaves an orphan. Victoria develops a bond with the child as they evade the war party.

    Feels good to be back immersed in viewing a variety of classic episodes.
     
  9. Message #3189 of 3622 Dec 11, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
    BobO'Link

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    No such heritage here (Western European/English Isles). When mom was pregnant with me they lived in Sandusky, OH. Dad discovered cabbage rolls at a local restaurant and went home raving about them to mom. They lived in a community with lots of Polish immigrants and mom got a recipe from one of her Polish friends. I don't know just how authentic my recipe is but it's quite good (and basic and easy but a bit of work doing the rolls). I've never had cottage cheese dumplings but am sure I'd like them, especially with the cabbage rolls. We normally have them with mashed potatoes (I keep asking for gnocchi - similar to Polish Kopytka - but haven't gotten it yet nor broke down and made it myself), carrots (sliced and boiled until tender), and English peas. My wife won't eat anything but the potatoes. A few years back I stumbled upon a "Cabbage Roll Casserole" recipe that tastes almost identical to the rolls without the work.

    Dad worked at a TV station in Sandusky. His first week of work he was told to bring extra clothes to leave at the station for those times they'd get iced in - for days. He went home, told mom, "Start packing. We're moving somewhere warm before winter sets in." and a few months later we wound up in SE Missouri. I grew up to absolutely love roller coasters. Dad moved me away from the best coaster park in the world. I've never forgiven him. ;)
     
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  10. Message #3190 of 3622 Dec 11, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2019
    BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

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    I've watched the first 2 seasons of Bewitched the past few weeks - the glorious BW versions I purchased a while back. Great stuff! And I'd forgotten Tabitha makes her appearance about halfway through S2. Of course she's not the annoying brat of a kid she became later and there are no inane story lines that revolve around her making her toys move, misuse of magic, etc.

    I'd also forgotten that some actors first appeared in supporting/character roles and were later made regulars:

    Uncle Arthur (aka Paul Lynde) first appeared in "Driving Is the Only Way to Fly" (S1E26) as a nervous driving instructor teaching Samantha how to drive. He appeared in only 11 episodes. I'd have sworn it was more.

    [​IMG]

    Doctor Bombay (aka Bernard Fox) 19 episodes - first appeared in "Disappearing Samantha" (S2E29) as a lecturer who gives talks on "Witches do not exist" and inadvertently curses Samantha and Ednora.

    Seen here with Carol Wayne's sister Nina Wayne from that episode:
    [​IMG]

    Esmerelda (aka Alice Ghostly) 16 episodes - first appeared in "Maid to Order" (S2E17) as a rather inept maid who causes more problems than she solves (not unlike her Esmerelda role). She became a series "regular" as the replacement for Aunt Clara (aka Marion Lorne) following Lorne's death.

    Seen here with the very pregnant Elizabeth Montgomery:
    [​IMG]

    When the Christmas episode from S2 started I thought I'd received a bad set or gotten on the wrong disc as I knew I'd seen the episode when watching S1. So I look it up to see what's going on. I'd absolutely *never* noticed before that they reused that S1 episode to give Montgomery time off for the delivery of her actual baby. All that changed was the cold open.

    And I mentioned Aunt Clara (aka Marion Lorne) who appeared in 27(!) episodes. She first appeared in S1E7, "The Witches are Out" and was in another 7 episodes those first 2 seasons. According to IMDB she owned a collection of antique doorknobs, a fetish that was incorporated into her Aunt Clara character. The props department often used some of her pieces on the show.
    [​IMG]

    And then a young Richard Dreyfuss (18 at the time) makes an appearance as Rodney, an obnoxious boy warlock Samantha used to babysit who's now infatuated and attempting to come between her and Darrin. "Man's Best Friend" - S2E34 (yes, boys and girls - episode 34 of 38(!) that season - there were 36 in S1. That'd be 3-4 seasons today - no wonder we rarely had re-runs!):
    [​IMG]
     
  11. mark-edk

    mark-edk Second Unit

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    Working my way thru Season 6 of Perry Mason (my final season because I wasn't able to buy the set in order). One thing that's really annoying me about this season is the end credits. Most of them are tampered with in some way. Sometimes the music fades in on the second measure rather than the first. Some episodes have glaring edits in the music. The credits themselves often have something cut out of them, with a quick crossfade or ugly jump cut disfiguring the video. But one episode of the season had credits intact, with the version I remember best: The Perry Mason theme proper. Then when it ends a mini-version of the Mason theme (basically the intro and a more florid ending) over a short second set of credits including the CBS Production slide. I wonder if all the season six credits were supposed to be like that. Why bother to edit them at all, to save three or four seconds?
     
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  12. bmasters9

    bmasters9 Producer

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    I have the two volumes of that 6th go, and I'll have to look that up to see what you're referring to.
     
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  13. Message #3193 of 3622 Dec 11, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2019
    ClassicTVMan1981X

    ClassicTVMan1981X Screenwriter

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    Yes, this issue bothers me about them, too!

    The original way the closing credits ended on all season six and seven episodes was like this...
    Long closing theme (first part)
    (Final commercial break)
    Shorter closing theme (second part)
    CBS Television Network "Iris" logo

    The reason why it ended like this was because between the dividing points of the closing theme, there was one last commercial break. On season five, it ended more conventionally: the shorter first part of the closing theme was used to mark the last commercial break. Analysis of the closing for that season (starting from episode 3):
    Short closing theme (first part; with director and writer credits)
    (Final commercial break)
    Longer closing theme (second part)
    CBS Television Network Film Presentation logo (with drumroll and four-note brass jingle)
    CBS Television Network "Iris" logo

    None of the episodes from these two seasons, nor the last two (seasons 8-9), should have the 1959-62 CBS Television Network Film Presentation logo (the one used on seasons 3-5).

    ~Ben
     
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  14. mark-edk

    mark-edk Second Unit

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    Thanks, excellent info!
     
  15. Rustifer

    Rustifer Screenwriter
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    Great array of shows, Doug! Always been a fan of Jag and go back every now and again to watch an episode.

    Yeah, the B&W seasons are the best. Funniest, too.

    Young Dreyfus popped up in quite a few mid-60's series, i.e. Peyton Place, Gidget, Ben Casey...
    A little jarring to realize how long he's been around.
     
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  16. Flashgear

    Flashgear Screenwriter

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    Congratulations on your well earned retirement Doug! I hope you have a much blessed, fulfilling, restful and happy retirement! We are always impressed by the quality line-up of great shows in your viewing reviews. You have compelled me to revisit any number of episodes that you featured therein...keep inspiring us along the way in my own layabout years!

    Oh, and Merry Christmas and happy new year!
     
  17. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

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    When revisiting these older series I'm always surprised to see now "big and famous" stars in bit roles. You tend to forget just how many people got their starts in TV series those years. That's when I start to wonder just why some transitioned to movies, doing quite well, while their TV appearance(s) are lackluster and "big name" TV stars, who were quite good, never could make the jump to movies or if they did delivered a performance that just fell flat.

    As I get older I'm far more aware of TV actors from the 60s/70s/80s who, for me, always came off like they're acting yet got regular work.

    Last night I watched a S3 episode of Hart to Hart, "Hartland Express" with Leigh McCloskey in the cast. Every line he delivered was done in such a way to sound like an amateur - although by this time he'd had dozens of rolls under his belt. He made Florence Henderson sound good (and she could sometimes come off stagy in her delivery). That episode also featured David Doyle, Ron Glass, Bernie Kopell, and Carol Lynley. While the episode isn't one of the better ones (McCloskey's delivery throughout and the fight as they leave the train at the end is done so poorly as to be laughable) that list of stars is quite nice.

    And that fight... Jonathan jumps Vernon Casper (McCloskey) as he's attempting to escape and both fall out of the train onto a pile of luggage. From there they can't decide if the train is moving or standing still. While on the loading dock it's slowly moving and they occasionally get thrown against its moving side. A dangerous stunt but mitigated by them cutting to someone *leaning* against the side of the train being hit a few times. Than back to a long shot scuffling on the dock while the train is moving slowly, coming to a slop. This happens several times totally ruining the scene.

    Leigh McCloskey and Florence Henderson from said episode:
    [​IMG]
     
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  18. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

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    Those potato chip-sized eyeglasses certainly aren't flattering, and I say this as someone who wears glasses.
     
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  19. Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

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    Other than episodes of The Mandalorian and the new The Grand Tour special (both highly recommended), it's all classic Christmas TV shows all the time here the Flugel household, most of it courtesy of YouTube (reviews ported over from the "Favorite Christmas Episodes" thread):

    The Adventures of the Scarlet Pimpernel

    1.11 "The Christmas Present"
    "They seek him here, they seek him there. They seek him everywhere. Is he in heaven? Is he in hell? That damned, elusive Pimpernel."

    This might not be a typical episode of this series, or the best (haven't seen any others yet), but I found it very well done, with some nice snappy dialogue, fine acting and a heartfelt message underneath the disguises and derring-do. I'm sure other entries in this short-lived ITC series are more action-packed and swashbuckling, as befits the subject matter, but for a Christmas episode, this was suitably dramatic. Marius Goring is terrific, all foppish layabout as Sir Percy Blakeney, but once he's alone and learns of his new mission, he instantly turns into the steely and serious Pimpernel.

    Blakeney sneaks into France to rescue several aristocrats held in a house in the countryside, but is taken aback when he finds out that they are all young children. What to do, what to do...the Scarlet Pimpernel is not one to give up when faced with a challenge, but some quick thinking is in order if he is going to be able to whisk the children out of the country...The final grace note is a good one, as the Pimpernel, having successfully brought his young charges to the safety of his English home, leads a spirited rendition of "The Twelve Days of Christmas." Based on how much I enjoyed this episode, I'll be picking up this series on Region 2 DVD real soon.

    The Lucy Show
    - 1.13 "Together for Christmas"
    Lucy and Viv are planning to spend the holiday together along with their children, but find themselves constantly bickering about whose Christmas traditions will be observed. Very funny lines abound here, and both comediennes are on fine form (the scene where both ladies start destroying each other's Christmas trees is a hoot). The kid actors are also good value, especially the little scene stealer playing Lucy's son (Jimmy Garrett). Pity that the series appears to phase the kids out pretty early on. Cute show, and you can tell that Lucy is happy to have I Love Lucy crony and old pro Vivian Vance to bounce off of.

    I gotta say, though, I'm with Lucy...oyster stuffing sounds absolutely disgusting!

    David Nixon's Magic Hour
    1975 special from The David Nixon Show is not quite as good as the previous one, but still enjoyable. Quite a lot of card magic in this one, which I must say, while impressive enough, is not my favorite kind. But we also have a Abba-inspired Brit pop group called Champagne (headed by two stacked female lead singers whose costumes leave little to the imagination), a troupe of performing chimps and assorted other hijinks.

    Dragnet 1967 - 2.15 "The Christmas Story"
    Sgt. Friday and his partner Bill Gannon take on an unusual case on Christmas Eve...someone stole a little baby Jesus statue from a church's Nativity scene, and Father Rojas hopes the detectives can track it down and return it in time for Christmas morning mass. This show always seems to have at least one amusing scene every episode, with an actor or actress playing a peculiar or idiosyncratic witness or information source, and here we get Ralph Moody as a cantankerous owner of a religious art shop. I got a kick out of him, and I could tell Jack Webb did too. Just a gentle, life-affirming story all around...I really enjoyed this one. I also checked out a few minutes of the 1950s version of this story and the '60s one seems to be nearly a word-for-word remake. The '50s version is probably better and snappier, but I liked the '60s one just fine. Will likely watch the earlier version next year.

    Poirot - 3.9 "The Theft of the Royal Ruby"
    This adaptation of the story "The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding" is a personal Christmas favorite. The Belgian master detective (David Suchet) just wants to enjoy the holiday alone in his comfortable modern apartment in London, with his books and hand-made chocolates, but is pressed by Her Majesty's government into spending a traditional Christmas at a country manor. His mission: to nab a couple of thieves who stole a royal ruby from a boorish Egyptian prince. Very fun, and much lighter in tone - and more Christmassy - than "Hercule Poirot's Christmas." Besides the enjoyable mystery plot, we get a big Christmas dinner, including Christmas pudding, plus tree decoration, charades, Christmas mass at the local church (complete with choir) and other seasonal elements - all served up with this series' customary sumptuous art direction, costuming, props and period 1930s detail. The only (minor) flaw is the utter absence of any snow in the exterior shots (it was a full-on white Christmas in the original story). This series looks marvelous on Blu-Ray, by the way.

    The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet
    1.12 "Boys' Christmas Money"
    David and Ricky want to get a job to earn some money to buy Christmas presents. Ozzie and Harriet aren't too sure about it at first, but admire their intentions and eventually give them the go-ahead. Ozzie tries to help by offering some extra money to the local grocer if the man throws some work the boys' way. Turns out, Harriet has a similar deal going with the baker. So when the boys get called in to work that afternoon, each parent assumes they know exactly where they're going...but do they?

    For such a gentle slice of life story about nice people having simple misunderstandings, there are a heck of a lot of laughs here. Everyone gets their fair share of funny lines, but once again the cream goes to Ozzie and little Ricky (who possesses terrific natural comic timing - his refrain of "Oh, I don't mess around, boy" cracked me up). And it's refreshing to see a sitcom where family members actually spend time not only talking, but listening to each other. When Ozzie tells his (embellished, as it turns out) story about his first work experience back when he was their age (walking through three miles of snow, etc.), I was waiting for the standard sitcom cliche eye rolls and sarcastic comments...but here, the boys listen patiently and ask their dad questions. The show is legitimately, and frequently, funny, but there's respect there, too, which is a treat to see. Will watch the follow-up S1 episode, "Late Christmas Gift" later this week.
     
  20. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

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    I'm from The South (born and raised). *Every* "stuffing" I've eaten was absolutely disgusting! We have "dressing" (and at my house it's "chicken and dressing") which is a whole 'nuther dish, usually made with slightly different ingredients and spices, and cooked completely different than stuffing. At my house it's a side dish for the ham (no turkey's allowed - other than relatives, friends and/or in-laws) - and none of that "fancy" spiral sliced stuff - a real ham cooked in a slow oven for hours - preferably overnight. I can hardly wait for Christmas to have it again! :D
     
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