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What did you watch this week in classic TV on DVD(or Blu)?

Discussion in 'TV on DVD and Blu-ray' started by Bryan^H, Aug 28, 2015.

  1. Message #3001 of 3178 Oct 23, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
    Rustifer

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    Episode Commentary
    Father Knows Best
    "The Angel's Sweater" (S3E15)

    The sister of Jim Anderson (Robert Young) shows up at the Anderson house for the holidays. The only one happy about Aunt Niva's (Katherine Warren) arrival is Jim himself, who keeps promising egg nogs for everyone as a diversion to Niva's scatological disposition.
    Kathy (Lauren Chapin) in particular finds Aunt Niva to be about as compatible as a lantern is to Mrs. O'Leary's cow. Christmas is spoiled for sure in little Kathy's estimation.

    To add to the general household malaise, a water pipe breaks inside a wall of the house. Where to find a repairman on Christmas Eve?
    A search of the yellow pages (remember those?) turns up Mr. Fix-it (Ludwig Stossel), a kindly white-haired gentleman of some European descent. Distraught Kathy finds solace in talking to Mr. Fix-it as he administers his repair to the busted pipe. The man fairly bubbles over with good cheer, sticky-sweet platitudes, and--of course--a relevant story about a young girl conveniently named Katrina. In this day and age, most parents would have separated the old coot from their children and rung up the cops. But this is 1958, where the only predators known to suburban mankind are raccoons in the nightly garbage.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Great fun listening to Bud talk dirty to his girlfriend; The family prays for Margaret's stew to be edible; Kathy sadly learns a dog is smarter than her

    Mr. Fix-it's story gets re-imagined using the entire Anderson crew as characters, all speaking in biblical thee's and thou's. Katrina is searching through the village for "the perfect gift" which, surprisingly enough, turns out not to be a brand new Maserati. Who knew? Anyway, Katrina / Kathy learns a valuable lesson from the repairman's story. A grateful Margaret (Jane Wyatt) forces a cement-like fruitcake on Mr. Fix-it in gratitude. The important thing is that Kathy and Aunt Niva reconcile their differences so that Jim finally gets to serve up his noxious egg nog to everyone.

    Moral: Be kind to mean old ladies and maybe you'll get mentioned in the will.

    Notes:
    After 1960, Lauren Chapin could not find work as an actress, having been typecast as Kathy Anderson for so many years on the series. "My mother would always dress me as Kathy Anderson and never let me be just Lauren Chapin", she bemoaned. Drugs followed, along with casual lovers, fast company, eight miscarriages, declining health, welfare and prison. Eventually she found religion and now manages a small cadre of singers and actors and is an ordained evangelist.
     
  2. Message #3002 of 3178 Oct 23, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
    bmasters9

    bmasters9 Producer

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    Bumping this up-- have taken the checkers on Riptide!

    nascarcheckeredflag.

    Just want to say that I have been enjoying Riptide very much because of this: that the trio of lead characters in this NBC series (Cody Allen, Nick Ryder and Murray Bozinsky, all Vietnam vets, IINM), while they had their differences at times, and ran into some rather challenging cases and clients and suspects along the way, were, to me, more the band of brothers than the WWII soldiers in HBO's miniseries called Band of Brothers.

    Also, I personally enjoyed seeing June Chadwick's Lt. Joanna Parisi character from the middle to late going of the third and final go; she seemed, based on how helpful and friendly she was towards Cody, Nick and Murray, to be somewhat like a team mom in a lot of ways.

    Jack Ging's Lt. Ted Quinlan character, on the other hand, was far tougher in the early going of the series, but seemed to soften and be more friendly and helpful towards his last episode in the third and final season.

    All that said, again, I have finished Riptide through and through and enjoyed it, and I think VEI's all-in-one is another one of the great values on DVD (I even think it holds up better than Hardcastle and McCormick)!
     
  3. Message #3003 of 3178 Oct 26, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2019
    Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

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    In Search Of...
    1.10 "Atlantis"
    2.1 "The Lost Dutchman Mine"
    3.8 "The Great Lakes Triangle"
    More good entries from this '70s paranormal classic, none of them particularly creepy in subject matter but all still pretty interesting, esp. the lore about the legend of the Lost Dutchman Mine, of which I was previously unaware. Once again, Leonard Nimoy's compelling narration really holds things together.

    Battlestar Galactica - 1.6 "The Lost Warrior"
    Received my UK Blu-Ray set of this show (which also includes the much-maligned Galactica 1980, which doesn't look quite as bad as I remember), and rather than committing right off the bat to the opening three-parter, which I've seen a few times since its original airing, I decided to jump forward a little bit to this, one of the episodes I remembered most clearly from my youth. After evading a squadron of Cylons, Apollo (Richard Hatch) runs out of fuel and crashlands on a small planet. He befriends a young widow (Katherine Cannon) and her son, and in true Shane fashion, eventually squares off against the local scumbag ganglord keeping the community under his thumb, with the help of his quick-draw Cylon henchman. There's a fun western vibe to this episode, obviously, with the highpoint being Apollo's blaster-slinging showdown with the rogue Cylon. The show has more than its share of cheesy elements, but overall I enjoyed revisiting it after all these years. The regular cast is likable enough, though the script's over-reliance on goofy, made-up words like "felgercarb," "centon" and the like began to bug me after the umpteenth use. Also with Lance Legault, Claude Earl Jones and Red West.

    Gideon's Way - 1.14 "The Tin God"
    This 1964 one-season police procedural, based on a John Creasey series of novels, has a different vibe than the usual ITC action man heroics, more down-to-earth and workaday, which gives it its own distinct feel. John Gregson stars as amiable Scotland Yard Commander George Gideon, with Alexander Davion as his right-hand man, Chief Inspector David Keen. This episode focuses on two convicts who escape from Strangeways Prison, played by Darrin Nesbitt and a very young John Hurt. Nesbitt's character, Benny, is hellbent on revenge against his wife, Ruby, who "shopped" him to the coppers years before, after enduring repeated instances of domestic violence and criminal activity. Benny plans to get back at her by luring away their teenage son, who worships his father and refuses to believe all the bad things he's heard about him, and whisking him away to South America on a tramp steamer. Gideon, who arrested Benny in the first place, feels responsible for Ruby's plight, and marshals the full force of the Yard to track down the convicts before it's too late.

    The story is nothing we haven't seen before countless times on other cop shows, but the quality acting by the cast (despite Nesbitt being perhaps a tad too suave and articulate to be entirely convincing as a mad dog thug), typically slick ITC production values, and extensive location shooting around London, makes this one worth watching. I've seen some fans describe this series as a U.K. version of Naked City...haven't seen enough of Gideon's Way to make that judgment, but I can see some similarities in its tone, sympathetic both to the police and criminal classes. This episode was remastered for HD and is on one of Network's Retro-Action samplers, absolutely sparkling in black and white. And once again, ITC comes through with a memorable theme tune.



    Gomer Pyle USMC
    1.1 "Gomer Overcomes the Obstacle Course"
    1.2 "Guest in the Barracks"
    Howie encouraged me to pick up the first season of this Andy Griffith Show spinoff, and I'm glad I did, as it's a real joy. Initially, I was a bit taken aback, as the first episode basically ignored the backdoor pilot from TAGS and started more-or-less from scratch, but I suppose it makes complete sense, as it had to stand on its own for those who were just tuning in for the first time. Anyway, in no time at all I was smiling along with the shenanigans of sweet-natured, innocent rube Gomer, as he drives his apoplectic drill instructor, Sgt. Carter, up the wall. Gomer gets to interact with some of his fellow grunts more in episode 2, as he helps smuggle a lovesick pal's girlfriend into the barracks, to expected comedic effect. The chemistry between Neighbors and Frank Sutton is through the roof, and they should make for a great ying-yang duo as I work my way through this series for the first time. Highly enjoyable stuff.
     
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  4. Message #3004 of 3178 Oct 26, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2019
    BobO'Link

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    I took a break from Horror (looks like I'll make the 100 titles viewed so...) to watch the 2 telefilms that preceded Doc Martin.

    Yes, they are different than the series, but not appreciably so. "Doc" is still pretty much the same person/character just with a slightly different back story. Instead of a surgeon who's suddenty bothered by blood so "retires" to a small community to be a PCP he's an obstetrician who's divorcing his wife and looking to start a new life away from his adulterous "friends." In both he's the new doctor in a small harbor community though in one he's more friendly and engaged with the community while the other he's somewhat a curmudgeon. I'd have been quite happy had they just continued the series where the 2nd telefilm left off. Still, I do like the series so...

    Something I discovered reading about the telefilms was they were spun out of the movie Saving Grace (2000) and are prequels to that movie. I own a copy of that one so need to dig it out for a rewatch.
     
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  5. Message #3005 of 3178 Oct 28, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2019
    Rustifer

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    Episode Commentary
    Wanted: Dead or Alive
    "The Pariah" (S2E27) - 1960

    Josh Randall (Steve McQueen) rides into the town of Horse Hollow on his mustang (not the 5.0L V8 kind he'll prefer later on) looking for one Randy Halloran (Don Dubbins). The townspeople mistake Josh as one of the killers they've hired to knock off poor Randy. Nope. Josh is there to protect Randy--a promise he made to Randy's father.

    Randy Halloran, as a human being, proves to be about as odorous as a buffalo's fundament. His one saving grace is his incredibly gorgeous and protective girlfriend, Bess (Susan Oliver). The townspeople all despise Randy for buying up all their land to gain the right-of-way for a railway spur that no one wants. Town folks don't need no Wal Mart or Kroger movin' in, dammit! The General Store keeper offers Josh a thousand bucks to skip town, which he refuses. Sniveling Randy calls Josh a "noble creature" for his fortitude, which Josh assumes is just weasel-like pansy talk.

    upload_2019-10-28_9-18-53. upload_2019-10-28_9-19-29. upload_2019-10-28_9-21-36.
    When all else fails, either grab Susan Oliver around her chest or look down the front of her blouse; Dude, you lookin' at me...?

    A trio of nasty-looking gunman show up as expected to hunt down Randy. Josh has no luck in finding any help to stand up against them as the town's gumption is made up entirely of marshmallow. Cowardly Randy doesn't know how to handle a gun which makes him as useful as an elevator in an outhouse. So it's up to Bess' heaving bosom and Josh's tricked-out sawed off .40-44 Winchester to save the day. The killers don't stand a chance and are soon dead in the street as quick as if run over by an express Greyhound bus. So what becomes of Randy? Unfortunately, he drops dead of a heart attack from all the excitement. And what about Bess? A girl with a heaving bosom can go far in a town like Horse Hollow. Especially without a pansy boyfriend.

    Notes:
    I've always been fascinated by the bottomless depth of Susan Oliver's blue eyes. Besides just being beautiful, in 1967 she was only the fourth woman ever to fly solo across the Atlantic in a single engine Aero Commander plane.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Oh those eyes! I dare you to fly one of these across the Atlantic on your own...
     
  6. Flashgear

    Flashgear Screenwriter

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    So very true, Russ. Such a beauty and a very good actress as well. Too many fine performances to list, but right off the top of my head, her 3 episodes of Route 66. And of course, her place in television immortality was fixed in Star Trek's original pilot, The Cage...Susan Oliver could portray the wounded and heartbreaking vulnerable girl who suffers despite, or because of, her beauty in so many ways. There's no doubt she is one of our absolute favorites as a lovely guest star on so many shows. So sad that she passed away at 58 from lung cancer in 1990.

    Her phenomenal exploits as an aviator were mind blowing to me, especially as she had to overcome her fear of flying by hypnosis! She had previously had a scare as a passenger on a transatlantic Boeing 707 flight from NYC (her hometown) to Paris in early 1959...the airliner fell from 35 thousand feet to 6 thousand before the aircrew regained control, landing safely...it probably didn't help that this event happened the very same day "that the music died", the day that Buddy Holly died in his own plane crash. (Wikipedia). Susan Oliver was also in another crash as a passenger.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Susan Oliver as a young starlet and cover girl on a British fan magazine, 1958...
    [​IMG]

    Vina, unquestionably her most famous role...
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Message #3007 of 3178 Oct 28, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2019
    Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

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    I had no idea about Susan Oliver's aviation exploits...most impressive. Other than Star Trek, I most remember her from Route 66's "Welcome to Amity," the two-part "Never Wave Goodbye" from The Fugitive, and "Prisoner of Love" on The Andy Griffith Show, but she was in sooo many classic television shows. She was a unique beauty and a fine, sensitive actress.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Purple Wig

    Purple Wig Stunt Coordinator

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    Susan Oliver has another aviation-adjacent role in The Invaders "The Ivy Curtain" and is as memorable as ever.
     
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  9. Message #3009 of 3178 Oct 30, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2019
    Flashgear

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    With Halloween just a few days hence, I decided to revisit some episodes from Boris Karloff's Thriller...one episode that I am very fond of is Hay Fork and Bill Hook (Feb.7, 1961), with a fine guest cast of Kenneth Haigh, Audrey Dalton, Alan Napier, Alan Caillou, Doris Lloyd, J. Pat O'Malley. Directed by Herschel Daugherty, with a typically brilliant original music score by Jerry Goldsmith...

    The setting is a contemporary (to 1961) Welsh village called Dark Woods, nestled in the fog bound marshy moors of Western Wales...home to a traditional, superstition bound people who fervently hold fast to ancient beliefs concerning Witchcraft, the power of spells and curses, and fear the dark legacy of Druid magic and human sacrifice...fearing also that some among them are indeed practitioners of the ancient dark arts...at the Druid stones nearby...for many have died under suspicious circumstances for many centuries in the local folklore...another long time resident has now died, an elderly hedge cutter, found with his throat slashed by his own bill hook, a tool of his trade, in concert with the aforementioned hay fork...Scotland Yard sends a young inspector (Kenneth Haigh) to investigate...he drags along his newly wed young bride (Audrey Dalton)...all this while postponing their honeymoon!

    The wonderfully evocative Boris Karloff, in his introduction to tonight's story, dares us beat the Devil at his own game...my screen caps from the Image DVD complete series set...
    Hay Fork 4.JPG
    Hay Fork 3.JPG

    The cast is introduced by Karloff, with a nicely done process optical shot, their faces superimposed over a burning and boiling Witch's cauldron...all accompanied by Jerry Goldsmith's superb music! Strings swelling, viola, cello, oboe and bassoon eliciting a sense of a dark foreboding...
    Hay Fork 5.JPG
    Hay Fork 6.JPG

    Choosing to begin his investigation stumbling about in the dark with his wife in hand (naturally, ha, ha), the young couple are startled by a shadowy figure who lurks near the scene of the crime...the Druid stones...he turns out to be the local constable (Alan Napier), in his plain clothes, who has kept the scene under surveillance, standing guard with his pitchfork...
    Hay Fork 11.JPG
    Hay Fork 10.JPG

    Introductions having been established with the scary constable, the Inspector and his wife invite him to join them in their car to drive back to the village of Dark Woods...along the way, the inspector's wife is startled to see a black dog on the road that her husband doesn't see, and she grabs the steering wheel...piling the car into the ditch...the inspector and constable are adamant that there was no dog on the road to be seen...she is emphatically insistent that she did see a black dog in front of their car, about to be driven over! Unable to get the car out of the ditch, the constable leads the couple to a local imposing Manor House...the Lord of the Manor is played by the great character actor Alan Caillou...
    Hay Fork 14.JPG

    Welcoming them to his Manor, the Lord is concerned by the girl's strange story about a black dog that only she could see...he gently insists that there has been no black dogs allowed in the village and environs for generations past...long since some bloody and evil events centuries ago, that foretold of the black dog as an omen of death...the Lord tells them that these ancient superstitions still rule the people by virtue of the power of their traditional fears in believing them...and now they have recent proof of the dark evil that has long haunted the Druid stones...
    Hay Fork 16.JPG

    Allan Caillou as Lord of the Manor...and he also wrote this wonderful teleplay! I did some research on him, and from multiple sources he proved to be an absolutely fascinating man in real life! I will do another post in the near future on his back story, which is more dramatic and phenomenal than any Hollywood hero...as a teaser, I can tell you that this guy was a real life hero, along the lines of a James Bond in WW2...
    Hay Fork 20.JPG

    The Lord tells his guests that the locals believe the apparition of the black dog is a harbinger of more deaths to come...they believe the black dog to be a "Familiar"...a Demon in concert with the Devil himself! Then, a house maid enters, asking the Lord about a missing laundry hamper...a very large wicker basket...suddenly, the girl becomes frantic...insisting that a local girl is about to be a burned as a blood sacrifice!...burned in a wicker basket as a ritual sacrifice at the Druid stones! Her husband is aghast...how could his sheltered and naive young wife possibly have any knowledge of these bizarre and bloody ancient rituals? But she seems to be in a trance...saying softly "I can feel the flames...the burning!"
    Hay Fork 17.JPG
    Hay Fork 19.JPG

    Having turned down the Lord's offer to stay at the Manor, the Inspector decides that his murder investigation would be better accomplished with them staying at the village inn...where they encounter the constable and his social circle of fellow Ale drinking cognoscenti...what a great gallery of grizzled old faces...Alan Napier, Lumsden Hare and J. Pat O'Malley...these guys were always on casting call for shows like this...the pub is now all worked up into a near frenzy, having heard from the constable that the Inspector's wife has seen the black dog...much fearful ancient folklore is dredged up, to be mulled over while sipping a pint...
    Hay Fork 22.JPG

    Taking a room on the upper floor of the inn above the pub, the Inspector steps out to wash up in an adjacent shared washroom...leaving his wife alone...where she sits down at the dresser to put her hair up for bedtime...she is suddenly startled by something behind her that she sees reflected in the mirror...the ethereal black dog!
    Hay Fork 25.JPG

    A genuine chill results here, enhanced by Audrey Dalton's startling screams...hoo boy, she's a world class screaming machine...a nicely done genuine fright...
    Hay Fork 27.JPG

    The black dog that only she can see...a "Familiar" in league with the Devil and messenger of death? Or perhaps something more benign in sweetly mysterious ways?
    Hay Fork 26.JPG

    Back at the murder scene the next day, the clouds have parted and things are now a great deal sunnier on the Universal backlot...er, the Welsh moors...the Inspector, with his wife in tow, discovers the lost pocket watch of the deceased hedge cutter...courtesy of a British Army mine detecting section from the local base...the Inspector hopes to use it to bait the real murderer into exposing himself in a carefully laid trap...
    Hay Fork 29.JPG

    While the Inspector is lying in wait to trap the murderer elsewhere, his wife is left alone yet again...and reluctantly receives another strange visitor...not the phantom black dog this time, but this strange old lady who tricks her way into the room...the old lady is fascinated by the girl, telling her that she reminds her of her own youthful self...
    Hay Fork 30.JPG

    The old lady backs her into the wall, and drawing her fingertips across the young girl's face, the old lady tells her "You have the dark fire in your blood...and know things that only a witch would know!"...
    Hay Fork 31.JPG

    So as to not give away any spoilers, I will stop here and only say that I enjoy this splendid episode immensely...I'm surprised that Hay Fork and Bill Hook isn't more highly regarded among the Thriller fandom, including Alan Warren who wrote a book on the series...he considers it ordinary, but acknowledges the great Jerry Goldsmith's music does enhance it to great effect...I think the story is compelling, and nicely executed...but this episode, although it does feature supernatural elements (which Warren curiously denies), Hay Fork and Bill Hook doesn't have the more overt horror trappings that shock in other more celebrated Thriller episodes...and for that, I guess that he sees it suffering in comparison to other more famous episodes...he is also extraordinarily harsh on Audrey Dalton, calling her performance inept...which in my view is totally wrong...the real chilling moment in this episode is greatly enhanced by her well executed reaction...she may have not have been a truly great actress, but Warren doesn't have much to say about Kenneth Haigh's eye rolling reactions to the local people's superstitions that are repeated too often in the body of this episode...although there are some genuinely comic moments as well that charm you...

    If you like Celtic folklore and sentimentality with a touch of real chills, and if you are a dog lover...I think you will like this episode!
    Hay Fork 32.JPG
    Hay Fork 33.JPG

    Ah yes, that Jerry Goldsmith score...so evocative and powerful, perfection as a matter of course with this genius...
     
  10. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

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    I've been watching S2 of Thriller for that Horror Challenge. It makes excellent late night viewing as it's short so if (when) I nod off it's easy to pick back up and finish. I recall not being all that impressed when I watched S2 last year. I've found I was either mistaken or S2 amps things up as it's been quite good with only a few "clunker" episodes (and only clunker in comparison with others in the series - still better than most "modern" horror programs).

    My one gripe with the set is the music is quite loud in the mix. Something very unusual for 60s, especially early 60s, TV shows. If you set things to hear softer voices the music, especially "stings," will often blow your hair back. And there are no SDH/CC to make it easy to watch. I still like it but that's just annoying.
     
  11. Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

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    Great write-up on that Thriller episode, Randall! Coincidentally, i just watched perhaps the most famous episode from this series the other day - season one's "Pigeons From Hell," and boy, what a creepy entry that was! I was actually torn between that episode and "Hay Fork and Bill Hook," as I'm a sucker for anything involving dark Druidic doings on remote English moors. Audrey Dalton also appeared in two other Thrillers, including S2's "The Hollow Watcher," about a killer scarecrow. She might not be the world's greatest actress, but I like her. She has a naturalistic quality that I find appealing. She's the love interest in one of my favorite '50s creature features, The Monster That Challenged the World. It helps that she's easy on the eyes.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. bmasters9

    bmasters9 Producer

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    Hopefully this will be accepted here (if against the rules, please delete and warn), but I saw that third-and-final-season episode of Riptide again called "Who Really Watches the Sunset," and it seems there might have been somewhat of a fashion/clothing goof-- specifically, Darleen Carr's character Marlene Lewis, after that big explosion outside the flower shop, seemed to have been wearing heels without hose (this is a possible goof because women usually wore hose then when wearing heels, and the way the reaction shot was carried out would make you think Carr's character was otherwise dressed).

    riptidepossiblegoof.
     
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  13. Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

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    Forget about the lack of hose on Ms. Carr...what about the pastel flowers on Perry King's pants?!?

    And don't worry, Ben...Riptide is over 30 years old now, so it qualifies as classic television in my book!
     
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  14. Bert Greene

    Bert Greene Supporting Actor

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    For a memorable Audrey Dalton performance, take a gander at the episode of "The Dakotas" entitled "A Nice Girl from Goliath," in which she plays a really, really twisted gal. Psychotically evil, who seems to really get off on instigating death and violence. When I saw Dalton at the Williamsburg (Va.) Film Festival a few years back, I mentioned it to her, and she gave me a most sly, satisfied look. I think she liked that role.

    As for "Thriller," I think my favorite episode has always been "Parasite Mansion." Drippingly spooky atmosphere.
     
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  15. Flashgear

    Flashgear Screenwriter

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    Howie, I agree. And I imagine that it was because of the prestigious nature of the music that is one of the hallmarks of Thriller, that Image and Universal altered the audio mix to "enhance" those mono tracks for maximum effect when processing the isolated scores found on most episodes? I don't know for sure, just a guess. I was very happy when Image announced the complete series set, probably encouraged to do that because of their past sales success with their multitude of Twilight Zone releases. It would look great on Blu-ray, but who, if any, would venture to release it in HD? Maybe KL, and I once had hopes that Criterion would expand their scope to prestige and cult classic TV.
    Thanks Jeff. I've been watching select Thriller, Twilight Zone and (believe it or not) Rawhide episodes that can be viewed as Halloween offerings. I have detected your fondness for atmospheric, fog bound British set mysteries and suspense shows, often with Druidic references. I'm nearly certain that you will enjoy Hay Fork and Bill Hook. One particular Rawhide episode might qualify for your criteria, and I recommend it highly as one of my favorites in the entire series...season two's Incident of the Druid's Curse. I just watched that one and season five's Incident of the Pale Rider...there are quite a few episodes that might qualify, pretty much any episode where Hey-Soos starts to get the heebie-jeebies and begins to solemnly intone to Gil and Rowdy about some dark evil superstitions that be-devil his people, ha, ha...Thriller's Pigeons From Hell is one weirdly wonderful episode. I just love all the Universal Studios horror movie trappings found on Thriller, Alfred Hitchcock, Kolchak, etc...the marvelous set decorations and elaborate sets, many of them in use from the Golden age of Universal horror films. The hollow and eerie sound of the pigeons cooing is guaranteed to make my hair rise, ha, ha...I used to work as an industrial radiographer doing "x-ray" shots on pipelines, aircraft and bridges...I remember working under an old stone bridge that had been reinforced with structural steel where a million pigeons roosted, their cooing amplified by the hollows of the bridge arches to an ungodly racket...you know what TV show I was thinking of! I have KL's Monster That Challenged the World and of course love it for the '50s treasured artifact that it is. Audrey Dalton is nice eye candy...the monster is pretty good too, as is the locations they filmed at...I'm one of those goofs who makes a side trip when I'm at Palm Springs on occasion...and while taking in the vistas of the Salton Sea, you know what I'm looking for, ha, ha...
     
  16. JohnHopper

    JohnHopper Screenwriter

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    Actress Audrey Dalton-wise, I enjoy her performance in the season 1 episode of Thriller entitled "The Prediction"
    along with actor Boris Karloff playing a mentalist.
    In 1966, both Karloff and Dalton will appear again together in the iconic season 2 episode of The Wild Wild West:
    "The Night of the Golden Cobra".

    west_cobra.
     
  17. JohnHopper

    JohnHopper Screenwriter

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    Spooky-wise, you can watch an atmospheric episode of The Wild Wild West entitled:
    "The Night of the Druid's Blood" (season 1) produced by Gene L. Coon.
     
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  18. Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

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    Oh, yeah, some of those Rawhide eps are most definitely eerie. I've seen "Incident of the Druid's Curse" and quite enjoyed it. I also found "Incident of the Murder Steer" and "Incident of the Blue Fire" to have a nice, creepy tone. Agreed on "Pigeons From Hell," spooky Gothic atmosphere ladled on so thick that you could cut it with the proverbial knife. That was my first complete viewing of a Thriller episode...way to start with a bang, huh? I only have the Fan Favorites 10 episode set, but luckily most or all of the Thriller episodes are on YouTube.

    Very cool that you've made the side trip to the Salton Sea, Randall. It's such a fascinating location in The Monster That Challenged the World. Now I hear that the Salton Sea is so polluted that no one would be that surprised if a real mollusk monster would appear on its shores
     
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  19. Message #3019 of 3178 Oct 30, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2019
    Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

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    That's a good one, John...but for my money, the absolute peak spookiest Wild Wild West episode is season two's "The Night of the Man-Eating House." "TNOT Lord of Limbo" also has some dark fantasy overtones, but "Man-Eating House" is out and out horror. It's also the only episode I can think of that has no (on screen) female guest stars, so perhaps the only episode in all four seasons where James West doesn't get his smooching on...

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Jeff Flugel

    Jeff Flugel Screenwriter

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    Thanks for the Dakotas Audrey Dalton episode tip, Bert...will check that one out soon. Been meaning to get back to that series. And speaking of Warner westerns, I sure wish the Archive would release Colt .45 on DVD!
     
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