What diameters does sonotube come in?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by jeff lam, Nov 12, 2001.

  1. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    I'm pondering building my own sub for H/T use. I have built many simple, sealed sub enclosures in high school for many of my car audio friends so I have some experience but not nearly as much as most of you here. I am thinking as small a diameter as possible for the shiva driver(I'm pretty positive on the driver since everyone here recommends it). I don't know much about sonotube at all. What sizes does it come in? How thick are the walls? How do you connect those end caps to get a good seal? Where do you get sonotube?
    I don't mind the height of the sub(my entertainment center is over 5' high), I just want the footprint to be as small as possible, maybe 14" if that will work.
    Also, I was thinking, would it be the same to build a rectangular enclosure that stood upright with a down-firing sub just like a sonosub but use MDF and make it square instead of circular? I would think this would be easier but may not look as nice, even with a good finish.
    My objectives:
    To build a solid sub tuned to 20hz,
    To have a small footprint,
    To have it look nice,
    I pretty much want an SVS 20-39cs.
    Any help and other opinions on what I should do would be helpfull.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Kevin Golding

    Kevin Golding Stunt Coordinator

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    Our local concrete supply warehouse sells sonotube from 8" to 60" diameter. I know they have 12" and 16", but I'm not sure about 14". The 16" would be good for a Shiva, and about the diameter of an SVS. The walls are about 1/4" thick.
    Check the sonotube links from the DIY and Advanced topics page for a goldmine of information. Patrick Sun's pages were invaluable as I was designing and building mine.
    I'll defer to the experts on a 14" square enclosure, but the benefit of using sonotube is you don't have to cut and glue the sides, just the top and bottom. Cutting a piece of tube to length is (at least for me) easier than cutting and joining a four-sided box.
     
  3. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Who says a square enclosure wont look as nice as a sonosub? Basically, when building a subwoofer, the enclosure shape isn't too important. It's strength and getting the correct internal volume that you need to be concerned about. Beyond that, you can do pretty much anything you want with them. I've seen some rather handsome "box" designs that double as endtables and such. IE:
    http://www.sdinfo.com/volume_4_4/thriftythumper.html
    [Edited last by Dave Poehlman on November 12, 2001 at 02:41 PM]
     
  4. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    I'm not saying that it won't look nice, I'm just saying that I think the cylinder subs look better than box-type subs, especially if built properly (SVS). Besides, I won't be using it as an end table or anything like that. Its a sub that will stand up in the front just as a sub should. BTW, how much would it cost to put a nice finish on a box-type sub(like the type of finish most speakers have)? Black woodgrain finish like my Def Tech Prosub200.
     
  5. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    My Shiva cost me about $30 for the veneer on the front, top, and sides.
    A can of black paint...probably $8 and you should have the same look.
     

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