What are the highest grossing films of all time?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matt MacFarlane, Jun 18, 2002.

  1. Matt MacFarlane

    Matt MacFarlane Stunt Coordinator

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    I recently heard that Spiderman is the 13th highest grossing film of all time, but what are the other 12?
     
  2. Chad R

    Chad R Cinematographer

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  3. Derek Miner

    Derek Miner Screenwriter

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  4. Greg Br

    Greg Br Second Unit

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    How can anyone use box office reciepts as a gauge for anything anymore. Look at the much miligned Scooby Doo, it already did 56 million, even adjusted that is alot of money, its all marketing hype!
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    One thing that's always ignored in such lists is ticket prices. In terms of absolute admissions, I wonder if GWTW is still the all-time champ?
     
  6. ShawnCoghill

    ShawnCoghill Stunt Coordinator

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    Titanic is the Highest Grossing film of all time,,BUTTTT Gone With The Wind Sold more Tickets,and if you added inflation to the ticket price Gone With The Wind would be the largest Grossing film of all time.
     
  7. Morgan Jolley

    Morgan Jolley Lead Actor

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    I read somewhere that Star Wars Episode V and VI were kind of misplaced in the charts. One of them made more money than the other, while the other sold more tickets than the one.
     
  8. Damin J Toell

    Damin J Toell Producer

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  9. Sarah Temple

    Sarah Temple Agent

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    well, gone with the wind also came back to theaters, so do they count its original release, or both releases?
     
  10. Damin J Toell

    Damin J Toell Producer

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  11. Joe Wong

    Joe Wong Second Unit

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    It's hard to compare even after adjusting for inflation. Pre-VHS and DVD era films had multiple releases, whereas a movie like Titanic has been seen on home video and probably won't even be considered for a re-release (if at all) until its 20th or 25th anniversary.

    It may be better to compare inflation-adjusted initial release box office. Just a thought.

    Joe
     
  12. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    Different adjusted lists have different results. There are lots of factors that make trying to "adjust" the gross problematic:
    - The population has grown significantly
    - People now wait for films to come out on video; in the old days, you had to go to the theater
    - Average ticket prices don't necessarily track inflation for a given year
    - Some older films used to run under higher-priced road shows
    Counting total dollars may be meaningless, but at least it's "accurate" [​IMG]
    //Ken
     
  13. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

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    BUT, inflation is a BETTER marker than ticket prices for a number of reasons.
    1) Ticket prices are not the same anyway. I can see a film in Indy for $5.50 before 6, but 8 after 6...unless I go to a different theater where it's 8.50...and if I go to Chicago where it's $8.75...then I talk to the NYers who sometimes pay $10.
    I won't even add IMAX going for 7.50 all the time here, but being $10 when I was in Houston.
    2) 2nd run theaters then go for $1 or even .50.
    3) The bottom line is HOW MUCH was the film worth to the audience. And that is based in how much the money they spent was worth when they spent it.
    If theaters charged $20 starting right now, less people would go. BUT some people might find some films WORTH $20 anyway and would go. That's less tickets BUT the reason it's less tickets is because of the higher price.
    If I made all film 10 cents tomorrow, well we would break Box Office records in terms of TICKETS SOLD. But that would certainly not be a fair comparison to Gone with the Wind would it? Why? Because we would not be asking audiences to place nearly as much VALUE in seeing a film as when the ticket was $8.
    If the 10 cent film made as much as the $20 ticket film, would that mean the 10 cent film was more popular AS A FILM?? Or does it also say something about the $20 film that anyone was willing to pay 200 times the price to see it over the other film?
    So the bottom line is that how much cash the population was willing to give to a film tells us the films VALUE to the population.
    As for population increase and video rental...there is something to be said for a canceling effect. PLUS, older films benefitted from years of rereleases. So the potential audiences for Snow White or Gone with the Wind are possibly not lower than current films at all, and maybe even higher when it's all said and done. Introducing GWTW to 4 generations of audience (say 15 years between releases) gives you roughly 4 times the audience size (not to mention the growing population). 45 years after the first release you would have shown the film to 4 groups of population. I don't know populations so it's possible that the US did quadruple its population over the last 60 years.
    There may be more people now, but new films also suffer from disadvantages.
    Anyway, I have found BO Mojo to have a very good adjusted list which uses inflation for EACH SEPERATE release, they don't just use the original release date.
    We go over this every month or so and I don't understand people's hostility or disbelief in adjusted BO numbers. I think they reflect the strength of these films in society.
    Scooby may have come out strong, but it won't be a top 50 adjusted film in the least. And if it somehow does become that then it will certainly be all the talk in current society and quite the phenom.
    Just think of what Jurassic Park or Spider-Man have become in our culture. That tells you that the adjusted value and big BO do reflect the power of the film in current society.
     

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