Washing Machine problem

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by MarkHastings, Nov 4, 2005.

  1. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    I wished I had taken a photo before posting, so I've drawn up some diagrams. I have a strange problem with my washing machine...

    Below is a diagram of my washing machine.
    [​IMG]
    The blue pipe is the houses 'drainage' pipe.
    The yellow tube is the washing machines drain tube.
    and the red tube is the A/C humidifier's draining tube.

    The problem I have is, when the washing machine goes into its final spin, the suds get backed up a bit in the tube. This isn't too big of a deal, except the A/C tube is breaking the rubber seal that is on the end of the washing machine hose.

    This image shows what is happening inside the tube:
    [​IMG]
    From the top view:
    The purple shape is the rubber end of the washing machine hose, that is supposed to make a seal in the drainage pipe, but since the A/C tube (in red) also goes into the same pipe, it crimps the washing machine seal and the suds back up and come out through the opening that are created by the A/C tube.

    Hopefully all that made sense [​IMG]

    I've tried using less soap, thinking it was too much, but the same problem occurs. It's a new washer, so there's nothing wrong with the machine and all of the settings are 'normal'.

    Last night I took the A/C tube out (so the rubber seal would completely seal the tube) and while there was a slight bit of suds coming through, it was no where near as much as with the A/C tube in there.

    I was going to check at Home Depot to see if I could either plug up the gaps in the rubber seal or find another seal that has two holes, one for the washing machine tube and one for the A/C tube. Does something like that exist?

    I was also thinking of slicing the rubber tube slightly so the 'gaps' aren't as large.

    Ideas?

    p.s. There's no where else to run the A/C tube, so I'm stuck with both going into the same tube.
     
  2. Dheiner

    Dheiner Gazoo

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    Could you drill another hole in the plug?
     
  3. Dennis*G

    Dennis*G Supporting Actor

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    The house drain tube should be able to freeley drain the wash and A/C without it backing up. My guess is that you have bigger problems down the drain somewhere.
     
  4. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    My guess as well. I'd start by dumping a friggin' bottle of Draino down that sucker.
     
  5. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    The water goes down perfectly with no backups. I think the suds backup because of the elbow joint in the pipe. The suds aren't heavy enough to flow freely past the elbow (i.e there is no more gravity to pull the light suds the rest of the way).

    Again, I would assume there's no clog because the water goes down with no problems.
     
  6. aaron campbell

    aaron campbell Second Unit

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    I agree with the others. Looks like a drainage problem. What brand of washer do you have? I'm an appliance parts dealer and have never seen a plug on the end of a drain hose before.
     
  7. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    aaron, I'll have to get the exact make and model number (when I get home), but it's a brand new one.

    I wasn't there when it was installed, so the rubber end could have been added by the installer.

    p.s. The condo is brand new. I know that doesn't mean the pipes aren't clear, but I'll definitely look into that.
     
  8. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Does the washing machine require "HE" detergent? If so, and you're using regular detergent, that may cause excessive sudsing.
     
  9. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    Interesting, what's "HE" detergent?

    Actually, my dad thought it was because of the 'fabric softener added' detergent I used, but I switched to 'regular' Tide and it still does the same thing.

    It could be the detergent. I'll have to look into this "HE" stuff. definitely a LOT of suds. I don't know what a normal amount is, but there sure are a lot that come out.
     
  10. Dennis*G

    Dennis*G Supporting Actor

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    Sorry, I misunderstood before. Hmm. HE is a High Efficiency washer, and those take special HE soaps.

    You say the condo is new, and the washer is new. Did you have a washer in place before this one? If not, how much soap are you using? I know tide has 3 lines on the cap, which line are you filling too? If your new condo has soft water already, use less soap (on the tide cap, never above the second line) as soft water helps make lots of suds.
     
  11. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    I've actually been going below line 1 and leaving the water level at the highest setting and still tons of suds.

    I'll give the HE detergent a try, hopefully that'll solve the problem.

    Thanks for the responses.
     
  12. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Click here for information on HE detergent and laundry machines from the Soap And Detergents Association. HE washers are much more expensive initial cost than conventional ones, but they are obviously moreefficient. They are much easier on your clothes and wash better with less water. This saves energy, especially if you're using hot water (which I personally never do with my HE washer).

    If it's a front load, it's definitely a HE washer. If it's an HE washer, it should still work with non-HE detergent, but with lots more sudsing, and often much more rinsing (which ends up nullifying the HEness of the thing in the first place!).
     
  13. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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    I've also never heard of capping a washer drain. The problem may be that there isn't adequate venting for the drain line. In order for water to flow through a restricted space, it needs to be able to pull air in behind it.

    Also, is there no P trap? I would not want to rely on a gasket to seal out sewer gas.
     
  14. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I agree - that gasket should not be needed.





    It may be just a "holder" to make sure the hose is in place and doesn't pull out of the hole.






    .... huh huh that's what she said.... huh huh
     
  15. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    Not sure what that is, but the washer pipe connects to the sewer pipe. I assume there's something there that blocks the sewer gas.
     
  16. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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    A P trap is the part of the plumbing that drops below the grade of the regular line, like a sideways P (it's more like a U actually, usually directly below a sink or in this case, the pipe that the washer drains into). It is designed to trap and hold water, which in turn prevents gas from escaping from the sewer. With no trap, gas has a clear pathway from the sewer - yuch!

    As for the vent, in a normal plumbing situation, there should be a vent the same size as the pipe being fed, ie a 2" pipe has a 2" vent. These should run up and out the roof. Without the vent, you are creating a vacuum in the line, and it won't drain properly. It could just be a suds problem, but if it's backing up, I would see if there is any venting nearby, it should be with a few feet to be effective. If the washer drain line is small enough, it should be okay and vent around it (1" pipe inside a 1 1/2" pipe), but if there is no air being allowed into the line, it won't work right.
     

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