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roxy1927

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vincent parisi
I thought it was cut from the most recent Broadway revival. You mean it was kept in? Well I'm happy to hear that.
 

Ronald Epstein

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ajabrams

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I thought it was cut from the most recent Broadway revival. You mean it was kept in? Well I'm happy to hear that.
It was cut from that revival. Overall, the rewrite of the script of the revival version did the show no favors. They tried to add
"relevance" to a show that was meant as pure razzle-dazzle entertainment. To me, it was like painting a moustache on the Mona Lisa.
 

JohnMor

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It was cut from that revival. Overall, the rewrite of the script of the revival version did the show no favors. They tried to add
"relevance" to a show that was meant as pure razzle-dazzle entertainment. To me, it was like painting a moustache on the Mona Lisa.

I understand how “I’m An Indian, Too” is problematic today but I thought it was a shame they didn’t take the opportunity to commission new official lyrics that aren’t mocking Native American names. After all, Annie is thrilled by the honor, so why not have lyrics that really express that without the condescension. The use of real Native American names and other words could turn the song from a (now) condescending comic number into a vibrant celebration that would be both positive and a rarity. Of course, if it was to remain a big dance number, that would not eliminate the problem of non-Native American dancers being in red-face in most productions. So it would probably be best to make it just a song for Annie with no big dance number, at least for the majority of productions that might have limited availability to genuine Native American dancers.

Anyway, I just thought it was a missed opportunity.
 

haineshisway

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I understand how “I’m An Indian, Too” is problematic today but I thought it was a shame they didn’t take the opportunity to commission new official lyrics that aren’t mocking Native American names. After all, Annie is thrilled by the honor, so why not have lyrics that really express that without the condescension. The use of real Native American names and other words could turn the song from a (now) condescending comic number into a vibrant celebration that would be both positive and a rarity. Of course, if it was to remain a big dance number, that would not eliminate the problem of non-Native American dancers being in red-face in most productions. So it would probably be best to make it just a song for Annie with no big dance number, at least for the majority of productions that might have limited availability to genuine Native American dancers.

Anyway, I just thought it was a missed opportunity.
Dear boy, you do understand when Annie Get Your Gun takes place, yes? And you do understand that there are many Indians who HATE the moniker "Native American" and want nothing to do with it. Usually all this woke outrage comes from white people, which I find fascinating. The song is fun and funny and it should be left alone.
 

JohnMor

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Dear boy, you do understand when Annie Get Your Gun takes place, yes? And you do understand that there are many Indians who HATE the moniker "Native American" and want nothing to do with it. Usually all this woke outrage comes from white people, which I find fascinating. The song is fun and funny and it should be left alone.
The late 19th century. But that’s irrelevant. Irving Berlin didn’t write the music and lyrics and the Fields’ the book in the style and vernacular of the 1880s-1900. They wrote it to entertain contemporary post-war audiences in 1945 with the book, music and lyrics aimed at them. If one wants to perform it as a relic in a museum that’s fine and valid. But if one wants to do it as a commercial entertainment for modern audiences in the 21st century, taking into account modern sensibilities is more advisable.

Also, for what it’s worth, AGYG was my first professional acting job at age 10 in 1974 as Liitle Jake. That production was based on the 1966 Lincoln Center revival, which was itseIf updated and revised from the original. I have great affection for the piece. I was not a fan of the 1999 revisions. But like all theatrical art, it doesn’t just exist to satisfy my nostalgia for either the time it was originally written or the time I first became acquainted with it. It’s a living, breathing work that should speak to new audiences as well as old.
 
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haineshisway

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The late 19th century. But that’s irrelevant. Irving Berlin didn’t write the music and lyrics and the Fields’ the book in the style and vernacular of the 1880s-1900. They wrote it to entertain contemporary post-war audiences in 1945 with the book, music and lyrics aimed at them. If one wants to perform it as a relic in a museum that’s fine and valid. But if one wants to do it as a commercial entertainment for modern audiences in the 21st century, taking into account modern sensibilities is more advisable.

Also, for what it’s worth, AGYG was my first professional acting job at age 10 in 1974 as Liitle Jake. That production was based on the 1966 Lincoln Center revival, which was itseIf updated and revised from the original. I have great affection for the piece. I was not a fan of the 1999 revisions. But like all theatrical art, it doesn’t just exist to satisfy my nostalgia for either the time it was originally written or the time I first became acquainted with it. It’s a living, breathing work that should speak to new audiences as well as old.
But it does exist to entertain. Audiences can decide what they can tolerate and what they can't and I'm not a fan of pandering. Should we rewrite Oliver and Fagin? Shakespeare and Shylock?
 

OLDTIMER

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I saw Annie Get Your Gun on stage in Melbourne, Australia in the 1952 production. (I was 17). It starred Evie Hayes who had made Warner Bros shorts in the early '30s. She married another American performer, Will Mahony, and came to live and work on stage, and later on television and radio in Australia. I later met Evie socially. Alec Kellaway was also in the cast. He was the brother of Cecil Kellaway who appeared in numerous US films.
 
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AnthonyClarke

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I was just a bit too young back then to see Annie Get Your Gun. I could have seen it if someone had taken me ... as it was, my live theatre debut, also in Melbourne of course, was either Salad Days and other early treats included My Fair Lady (of course) and The Desert Song. Loved them all. ...
 

ArnoldLayne

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That was 3 months before 9/11. The revival closed less than two weeks before it.





I would have liked to see her do the show as it was originally written, but that was the late 1990s/early 2000s so they rewrote the book to be what they considered more culturally sensitive to the Native American characters … and still cast Larry Storch as the Chief!
We were at the Reba performance two weeks before 9/11, not sure which day. We had planned to be there the week of 9/11 and take the SOL tour that day. We moved the trip back two weeks into August, to save money.
 

Billy Batson

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I've just seen a rather good TV doc about Annie Oakley. A quite remarkable person, & well worthy of still being a household name...& rather unusually for Hollywood, better looking than the actress who played her (Betty Hutton).
 

Trancas

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I've just seen a rather good TV doc about Annie Oakley. A quite remarkable person, & well worthy of still being a household name...& rather unusually for Hollywood, better looking than the actress who played her (Betty Hutton).
I think I'd have to disagree with you on that. I wouldn't say a female Crispin Glover lookalike is more attractive than Betty Hutton.

Annie_Oakley,_Baker's_Artred.jpg
 

Billy Batson

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I think I'd have to disagree with you on that. I wouldn't say a female Crispin Glover lookalike is more attractive than Betty Hutton.

View attachment 94254

Ha, bad photo. There was some other photos in the program where she looked great, & she seemed to improve as she got older.

I'm really looking forward to getting this, which is unusual for me, being as I've never seen it, & I don't tend to blind buy these older films. I do have the CD & love all the songs, & I'm sure it'll look stonking.
 
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Garysb

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I always felt it was a shame that in the 1970's, the hey day of revival cinemas, Irving Berlin withheld the film from being shown, thus denying us the chance to see the film in a theater with an audience. There were many MGM film festivals during that time but none could include "Annie Get Your Gun".
 

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