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Warner Archive Blues (1 Viewer)

J. Casey

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With the announcement today that WarnerMedia is closing down the streaming service FilmStruck, I worry about the future of the Warner Archive division. Can anyone reassure me????
 

OliverK

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With the announcement today that WarnerMedia is closing down the streaming service FilmStruck, I worry about the future of the Warner Archive division. Can anyone reassure me????

Nothing has been posted to that effect but indeed you got to wonder what happens if some bean counter finds out that Warner Archive is not generating huge revenues for Warner either, so it would be nice to have some reassurance that all will be good at the Warner Archive.
 

Nick*Z

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The end of FilmStruck is merely a way for AT&T to consolidate Warner Media's platform. I for one, welcome the move - not to shrink the market for classic movies (obviously, duh!) but to telescope what was an unwieldy platform of various media outlets into something that will become a more prosperous business model for all. Every time one of these corporate decisions gets made everyone panics about the market effects on movie-land heritage. Rest assured: the Warner Archive is not going away. Classic movies are not going away. TCM is not going away. And maybe...just maybe...the freeing up of capital here will allow for Warner Media to do more restoration/preservation/archival work on their vast and superior library, getting more of it ready for physical media releases via the archive.

FilmStruck's premature retirement simply means two things - it wasn't turning over the kind of profits to make it a sustainable part of the WB franchise, and second, that WB and AT&T have collectively decided to put their monies elsewhere. Nothing here is getting dumped or dumbed down. The company is still going to cater to classic buffs and those in search of indie pics. FilmStruck just isn't going to be the platform for either category to prosper. Remember, folks, we're talking about a corporation. They see a company based on the results on a spread sheet.

If Jack Warner were alive today and running the biz he might have other sincere thoughts how to maximize results. The bean counters merely want to see a profit. That said, the proof of past endeavors has shown public interest in their back catalogs. So, they aren't going to simply ignore that interest because, marketed correctly, they can see a profit to be mined and made. The corporation want your coin and they're going to figure out the best way to get it. Ignoring fans entirely is just not good business sense. And, at the end of the day, its the biz that counts - not the artistry. We can either choose to lament the process, or look hopeful toward what will come next. Something is coming. And who knows? It might be more exciting than what's being left behind. Wait and see.
 

Robert Crawford

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The end of FilmStruck is merely a way for AT&T to consolidate Warner Media's platform. I for one, welcome the move - not to shrink the market for classic movies (obviously, duh!) but to telescope what was an unwieldy platform of various media outlets into something that will become a more prosperous business model for all. Every time one of these corporate decisions gets made everyone panics about the market effects on movie-land heritage. Rest assured: the Warner Archive is not going away. Classic movies are not going away. TCM is not going away. And maybe...just maybe...the freeing up of capital here will allow for Warner Media to do more restoration/preservation/archival work on their vast and superior library, getting more of it ready for physical media releases via the archive.

FilmStruck's premature retirement simply means two things - it wasn't turning over the kind of profits to make it a sustainable part of the WB franchise, and second, that WB and AT&T have collectively decided to put their monies elsewhere. Nothing here is getting dumped or dumbed down. The company is still going to cater to classic buffs and those in search of indie pics. FilmStruck just isn't going to be the platform for either category to prosper. Remember, folks, we're talking about a corporation. They see a company based on the results on a spread sheet.

If Jack Warner were alive today and running the biz he might have other sincere thoughts how to maximize results. The bean counters merely want to see a profit. That said, the proof of past endeavors has shown public interest in their back catalogs. So, they aren't going to simply ignore that interest because, marketed correctly, they can see a profit to be mined and made. The corporation want your coin and they're going to figure out the best way to get it. Ignoring fans entirely is just not good business sense. And, at the end of the day, its the biz that counts - not the artistry. We can either choose to lament the process, or look hopeful toward what will come next. Something is coming. And who knows? It might be more exciting than what's being left behind. Wait and see.
Yeah, we'll see as I hope my bad feelings about AT&T are wrong and that Warner continues to make classic films available with different options to view them.
 
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Ken_Martinez

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I do have to agree with Nick*Z. Having multiple specialty streaming services doesn't make sense when Disney is gearing up to hit with the combined force of their, Marvel, Lucasfilm and now Fox' content libraries. Not to mention the existing juggernaut that is Netflix.

As long as the new service maintains ties with Criterion, what's the issue?
 

Paul Penna

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The kind of audience for classic and art house films is a niche one and always will be, the way I see it, and probably a shrinking one as well, seeing as how the age demographic for them tends to be largely an older one. I don't see Warner's holdings in those areas being spread thin around their existing streaming outlets; FilmStruck, in fact, seemed well-targeted to the niche. Perhaps better marketing could have helped bringing it to the attention of more people in its potential market, but it seems to me that retaining the existing service and building on it would be a better way to grow that audience than dumping it for whatever future scheme they imply they plan on dreaming up. That is, if they actually intend to specifically target that audience.

Note that they intend their new service to compete with Netflix, as mentioned in the attached link. That it will have anything even approaching the range, depth and quality of FilmStruck's service I think is a forlorn hope.

https://variety.com/2018/biz/news/w...er-streaming-service-john-stankey-1202975598/
 
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Garysb

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I do have to agree with Nick*Z. Having multiple specialty streaming services doesn't make sense when Disney is gearing up to hit with the combined force of their, Marvel, Lucasfilm and now Fox' content libraries. Not to mention the existing juggernaut that is Netflix.

As long as the new service maintains ties with Criterion, what's the issue?
Per the email from Criterion it doesn't appear they will go with the new Warner Streaming Service.

News About FilmStruck
We have some sad news to share: earlier this morning, Turner and Warner Bros. Digital Networks announced plans to shut down FilmStruck, the streaming service that has been our happy home for the last two years. Like many of you, we are disappointed by this decision. When we launched the Criterion Channel in 2016, we had two goals: to ensure that our entire streaming library remained available, and to address our audience in our own voice. We’re proud of the work we’ve done, bringing curated programming and the full range of supplemental features to the streaming space, championing a diverse array of filmmakers from beyond our collection and creating original content that invites you into exciting conversations about cinema culture.

All this is very new, and we’ll be sure to keep you updated as we learn more details. But rest assured that we are still committed to restoring and preserving the best of world cinema and bringing it to you in any medium we can. In the weeks ahead, we’ll keep you informed about the great programming you can watch on the Channel before it shuts down on November 29, and we’ll be trying to find ways we can bring our library and original content back to the digital space as soon as possible. Thanks to everyone who enjoyed FilmStruck, and we hope you’ll join us as we look forward to what the future brings.
 

RichMurphy

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While this news saddens me, I will admit I was not a subscriber to FilmStruck. I was a subscriber to the first iteration of Warner Archive streaming, and while I wanted to support their service, it was very disappointing. The same films seemed to be recycled over and over, and once I bought an annual membership, I had many problems with connection related to my password and credentials. I passed on the second version of Warner's streaming service, but I admit I was tempted to give the Warner/Criterion combination of Filmstruck a chance. I guess that decision has been made for me.
 

Robert Crawford

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While this news saddens me, I will admit I was not a subscriber to FilmStruck. I was a subscriber to the first iteration of Warner Archive streaming, and while I wanted to support their service, it was very disappointing. The same films seemed to be recycled over and over, and once I bought an annual membership, I had many problems with connection related to my password and credentials. I passed on the second version of Warner's streaming service, but I admit I was tempted to give the Warner/Criterion combination of Filmstruck a chance. I guess that decision has been made for me.
Filmstruck was much better than Warner Archive's streaming service with a larger selection of films with better HD streaming as well as some Bonus Material specifically produced by Filmstruck for certain film titles.
 

Richard M S

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The announcement of it going away generated more press than it ever received while it was active. Some people posted on Twitter they never even knew it existed, but would have subscribed had they knew about it. So while I agree the audience is small, the demand is absolutely there!

However as with most bluray releases of classic films, there seems to be next to no outreach or advertising or press left to cover classic films.
 

skylark68

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I kept debating on whether to join or not. I guess my mind has been made up for me now. I'll be waiting, cash in hand for the next B&N Criterion sale...
 

SeanSKA

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The kind of audience for classic and art house films is a niche one and always will be, the way I see it, and probably a shrinking one as well, seeing as how the age demographic for them tends to be largely an older one. I don't see Warner's holdings in those areas being spread thin around their existing streaming outlets; FilmStruck, in fact, seemed well-targeted to the niche. Perhaps better marketing could have helped bringing it to the attention of more people in its potential market, but it seems to me that retaining the existing service and building on it would be a better way to grow that audience than dumping it for whatever future scheme they imply they plan on dreaming up. That is, if they actually intend to specifically target that audience.

Note that they intend their new service to compete with Netflix, as mentioned in the attached link. That it will have anything even approaching the range, depth and quality of FilmStruck's service I think is a forlorn hope.

https://variety.com/2018/biz/news/w...er-streaming-service-john-stankey-1202975598/

I totally agree. When Warner/AT&T start their streaming service, you might have a few classics like "GWTW" and "The Wizard of Oz" and "Casablanca" and "Citizen Kane" on there, but I would be shocked to see "Beyond a reasonable Doubt" or "In the Mood" , much less "Scenes from a Marriage" or "Kanal" on there. Most of these "niche" films will either disappear, or become extremely difficult to find.
 

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