warm-normal-cool question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bill Adlhoch, Jun 11, 2002.

  1. Bill Adlhoch

    Bill Adlhoch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2000
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I has my RPTV calibrated and the technicion made a comment that sports and other events under flourescent lighting should be viewed using the cool setting and blackand white movies should be viewed using the warm setting

    are there any other situations you guys can come up with where i would move the color temperature away from 'normal'?

    any help is greatly appreciated
     
  2. Justin Gates

    Justin Gates Agent

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2001
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Actual for most viewing you should have it set to warm as this is supposed to be the closest color temp to the NTSC standard.
     
  3. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2000
    Messages:
    2,909
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta
    Real Name:
    Michael Chen
    Greetings

    NTSC standard is supposed to be the warm mode. Period.

    Doesn't matter about sports or movies or news or what not.

    The people producing the sports programs view all their material on monitors set to 6500K (your warm mode in theory).

    Regards
     
  4. Robert P. Jones

    Robert P. Jones Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 1999
    Messages:
    289
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes. "In theory".

    Unless, of course, as in the older Mits's, the High setting actually DELIVERS closer to D6500K than the Low setting, OOB. Which was true there for several years, with the Mits's.

    In the newer Mits's, it's all over the map as to what they ACTUALLY deliver, on ANY of the color temp modes, OOB.

    Michael speaks rightly, about any display that is set up and calibrated ACCURATELY. A crap shoot these days, on any brand, as to whether that is true, OOB.

    Which is what Michael and I and other calibrators are all about, to get that display set up ACCURATELY. Not COLORFULLY. D9300K is much more COLORFUL, even tho it has superblue whites. Red push is much more COLORFUL, if you like your reds superdrenched when blue and green are accurate, or your greens and blues wilted and in the background when red is accurate for fleshtones, having had to roll back the color intensity level to get the fleshtones right. And you can fudge many things, but you cannot fudge the fleshtones.

    Accuracy is about precision balance - not one or another color, like blue, or red, taking the lead and making the picture much more COLORFUL, which is of course - as has also been pointed out by Michael in other threads - what sells TVs and is what is usually found, OOB. (would print that in many colors, if that were an option that was available, here...)

    With the older Mits's, many viewers clued in on these boards and using the pluge pattern on VE, found that it was actually better to use the High user temp setting until getting it set up correctly via calibration, after which the temp setting selected in the service menu would be the correct and calibrated one to use, at the delicious and highly precise, evenly balanced greyscale of D6500K.

    Which at that point could be either Low or High - viewer's choice at time of calibration, which would then be permanent after the calibration - depending on other factors, such as which is global and which is local, in the service menu. DVDs could show up in Low, HD in High, or both in High.

    But both would then BE showing up in D6500K - which, as Michael says, is the ONLY standard that really counts.

    Bottom line is, OOB you could not believe, nor put any faith in, what Mit had labeled as "Low - 6500K", in their user menu. I would not trust ANY OOB greyscale setting in user menu on ANY brand until verified via putting up the VE pluge pattern for that particular user temp setting.

    Still can't believe the Mits user temp designations, OOB, tho once calibrated to D6500K correctness, they have one of the most correctly linear greyscales out there.

    Mr Bob
     
  5. Bill Adlhoch

    Bill Adlhoch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2000
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    well i dont know about out of the box, but after an ISF calibration normal is exactly 6500 and warm is 5500 (or so) and cool is 9300 ( or so)

    whats this aboiut all ntsc should be at warm, John Gannon (my isf tech) said that warm is ONLY for B&W movies, was he wrong?
     
  6. Michael Lomker

    Michael Lomker Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 17, 2002
    Messages:
    164
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've become a true believer in professional calibration. I won't own a set that isn't set up by an ISF tech.

    We actually calibrated my set using the COOL setting, but like Robert said...any of those can be calibrated properly in the service menu and few are even in the ballpark out of the box.

    Anyone that spends $2k+ on a television and doesn't get it calibrated is wasting their money, IMO.
     
  7. Robert P. Jones

    Robert P. Jones Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 1999
    Messages:
    289
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Bill -

    Just fine. Use the Normal. My Panny defaults to Normal, so that's where my D6500K is set. Warm is then a bit pinker, cool is then a bit bluer. That's the way they are designed, some of them. Mit is different, that way, being that you can set each of the high and low to distinct settings, and medium is the average of the 2 others.

    Ideally we would all set the Warm to D6500K, but that is not always practical. John has set your set up optimally.

    Mr Bob
     
  8. Bill Adlhoch

    Bill Adlhoch Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2000
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    my set is a Panasonic PT-56WXF95A

    maybe I was getting confused as to what settings mean what on different tv's
     

Share This Page