JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
Well, let’s continue our exploration of Gunsmoke! I come out of The Long Branch and walk down the streets of Dodge City and my next stop is… season 20 and as Matt Dillon used to say to his opponents: “Hold it right there”.

GUNSMOKE • SEASON 20 (1974-1975) (24 episodes • 50 mins • color)
It’s the final season, be warned! Witness the Long Branch without Miss Kitty: weird. One odd episode (“The Guns of Cibola Blanca“) was written for and rejected by Amanda Blake from a draft presented late season 19 and was modified to fit another actress playing a saloon owner. The opening main titles is renewed, the picture medallion credits are gone—starting from season 11 and lasting nine seasons—and replaced by the leading actors showned in their characters’ daily activites (underlined by a zoom in) instead and actor James Arness looks old like John Wayne during his last period. As usual, the orchestration of the main theme music is renewed. For the anecdote, James Arness wears a blue shirt instead of the regular berry red one during certaine pisodes: “Thirty Dollars a Month and Found”, “The Wiving” and “The Colonel”. At this stage, the series looks retrograde, hybrid and clumsy because it has the old sixties framework combined with the naturalistic mid-Seventies texture, in short, the series is self-conscious. Quality collapses with the producer shift but don’t worry there are still some solid episodes under Leonard Katzman, the first producer. Amongst the many guests, here’s an early part by actor Nick Nolte in “The Tarnished Badge” and a late part in “The Iron Men” by western veteran John Russell, known for the Warner Brothers series Lawman.

Find the usual directors like the McEveety brothers (Bernard and Vincent) and one Wild Wild West artisan (Swedish-born actor Gunnar Hellström) and newcomers: actor Victor French who becomes a surrogate Robert Totten and also works on Little House on the Prairie and its shows, Gunsmoke producer Leonard Katzman, Irish-born Michael O’Herlihy returning from Gunsmoke and Rawhide and while working on Hawaii Five-O.

A semi regular named Hannah (actress Fran Ryan) appears five times and replaces Miss Kitty at the Long Branch: “The Wiving”, “Brides and Grooms”, “I Have Promises to Keep”, “The Busters”, “Manolo”. A brand new clan shows up twice this season through the Hockett family: “The Wiving” and “Brides and Grooms”. Judge Brooker appears one more time: “The Fires of Ignorance”. As in the previous season, find again the multi-part episodes: “The Guns of Cibola Blanca” and “Island in the Desert”.

Composers are expanded to four names: Bruce Broughton, Jerrold Immel, Martin L. Klein, John Parker but Martin L. Klein teams up with Bruce Broughton. Find a new supervising music editor named Robert Y. Takagi that replaces veteran Gene Feldman that starts from season 5 (1959-1960) as a music editor but also work on Rawhide from season 5 to season 8 in which he tracks many cues from Gunsmoke.

PRODUCTION TEAM
producers: Leonard Katzman and John G. Stephens
executive producer: John Mantley
associate producer: Ron Honthaner
executive story consultant: Jack Miller
director of photography: Edward R. Plante

The team is renewed: starting from season 16, assistant story consultant Paul F. Edwards vanishes, producer Leonard Katzman is replaced by John G. Stephens from episode #14 (“The Squaw”) and cinematographer Ted D. Landon is replaced by Edward R. Plante returning from the last two seasons of The Wild Wild West because he used to work with Leonard Katzman. Plante changes the look of the series by adding harsh light and sometimes chiaroscuro and achieves his series’ masterpiece: “Thirty a Month and Found”. Producer John G. Stephens, executive producer John Mantley and director of photography Edward R. Plante and many Gunsmoke crew members (writers, directors, composers) will later work on How the West Was Won (1976-1979), starring actors James Arness and Bruce Boxleitner.

CAST OF CHARACTERS
Regular cast: James Arness (Matt Dillon), Ken Curtis (Festus), Milburn Stone (Doc), Buck Taylor (Newly).

Supporting cast: Ted Jordan (Freight agent “Nathan” Burke), Woodrow Chambliss (Woody Lathrop), Robert Brubaker (Long Branch barkeep Floyd), Fran Ryan (Long Branch owner Hannah).

As usual, the strength of season 20 is the colorful guest actors that add weight to the story: see Richard Anderson, Ned Beatty, John Beck, Bruce Boxleitner, David Brian, Gary Busey, Anthony Caruso, Lee J. Cobb, John Colicos, Gene Evans, Eduard Franz, Victor French (2), Harold Gould, Nicholas Hammond, Richard Jaeckel, Paul Koslo, Strother Martin, Cameron Mitchell, Harry Morgan (2), George Murdock, Nick Nolte, Nehemiah Persoff, John Russell, John Saxon, William Smith, David Soul, Don Stroud, Daniel J. Travanti, Robert Urich, John Vernon, David Wayne, Van Williams, Morgan Woodward.

THE DVD SET
The prints are restored and look wonderful. In each episode and at the end of the first set of end credits, a voice-over announcer introduces the next week trailer. It features separated from the episodes and unrestored next week trailers and, also, English subtitles. As in the previous season set, you find three extras: a 15 minutes 41 discussion called Ben and Beckey Talk Gunsmoke: Season 20 in which the two hosts highlight a selection of season 20 episodes with specific guest actors, an audio commentary for “Thirty a Month and Found” by writer Jim Byrnes and film historian Ben Costello, a photo gallery.
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
Well, let’s continue our exploration of Gunsmoke! I come out of The Long Branch and walk down the streets of Dodge City and my next stop is… season 20 and as Matt Dillon used to say to his opponents: “Hold it right there”.

GUNSMOKE • SEASON 20 (1974-1975) (24 episodes • 50 mins • color)
It’s the final season, be warned! Witness the Long Branch without Miss Kitty: weird. One odd episode (“The Guns of Cibola Blanca“) was written for and rejected by Amanda Blake from a draft presented late season 19 and was modified to fit another actress playing a saloon owner. The opening main titles is renewed, the picture medallion credits are gone—starting from season 11 and lasting nine seasons—and replaced by the leading actors showned in their characters’ daily activites (underlined by a zoom in) instead and actor James Arness looks old like John Wayne during his last period. As usual, the orchestration of the main theme music is renewed. For the anecdote, James Arness wears a blue shirt instead of the regular berry red one during certaine pisodes: “Thirty Dollars a Month and Found”, “The Wiving” and “The Colonel”. At this stage, the series looks retrograde, hybrid and clumsy because it has the old sixties framework combined with the naturalistic mid-Seventies texture, in short, the series is self-conscious. Quality collapses with the producer shift but don’t worry there are still some solid episodes under Leonard Katzman, the first producer. Amongst the many guests, here’s an early part by actor Nick Nolte in “The Tarnished Badge” and a late part in “The Iron Men” by western veteran John Russell, known for the Warner Brothers series Lawman.

Find the usual directors like the McEveety brothers (Bernard and Vincent) and one Wild Wild West artisan (Swedish-born actor Gunnar Hellström) and newcomers: actor Victor French who becomes a surrogate Robert Totten and also works on Little House on the Prairie and its shows, Gunsmoke producer Leonard Katzman, Irish-born Michael O’Herlihy returning from Gunsmoke and Rawhide and while working on Hawaii Five-O.

A semi regular named Hannah (actress Fran Ryan) appears five times and replaces Miss Kitty at the Long Branch: “The Wiving”, “Brides and Grooms”, “I Have Promises to Keep”, “The Busters”, “Manolo”. A brand new clan shows up twice this season through the Hockett family: “The Wiving” and “Brides and Grooms”. Judge Brooker appears one more time: “The Fires of Ignorance”. As in the previous season, find again the multi-part episodes: “The Guns of Cibola Blanca” and “Island in the Desert”.

Composers are expanded to four names: Bruce Broughton, Jerrold Immel, Martin L. Klein, John Parker but Martin L. Klein teams up with Bruce Broughton. Find a new supervising music editor named Robert Y. Takagi that replaces veteran Gene Feldman that starts from season 5 (1959-1960) as a music editor but also work on Rawhide from season 5 to season 8 in which he tracks many cues from Gunsmoke.

PRODUCTION TEAM
producers: Leonard Katzman and John G. Stephens
executive producer: John Mantley
associate producer: Ron Honthaner
executive story consultant: Jack Miller
director of photography: Edward R. Plante

The team is renewed: starting from season 16, assistant story consultant Paul F. Edwards vanishes, producer Leonard Katzman is replaced by John G. Stephens from episode #14 (“The Squaw”) and cinematographer Ted D. Landon is replaced by Edward R. Plante returning from the last two seasons of The Wild Wild West because he used to work with Leonard Katzman. Plante changes the look of the series by adding harsh light and sometimes chiaroscuro and achieves his series’ masterpiece: “Thirty a Month and Found”. Producer John G. Stephens, executive producer John Mantley and director of photography Edward R. Plante and many Gunsmoke crew members (writers, directors, composers) will later work on How the West Was Won (1976-1979), starring actors James Arness and Bruce Boxleitner.

CAST OF CHARACTERS
Regular cast: James Arness (Matt Dillon), Ken Curtis (Festus), Milburn Stone (Doc), Buck Taylor (Newly).

Supporting cast: Ted Jordan (Freight agent “Nathan” Burke), Woodrow Chambliss (Woody Lathrop), Robert Brubaker (Long Branch barkeep Floyd), Fran Ryan (Long Branch owner Hannah).

As usual, the strength of season 20 is the colorful guest actors that add weight to the story: see Richard Anderson, Ned Beatty, John Beck, Bruce Boxleitner, David Brian, Gary Busey, Anthony Caruso, Lee J. Cobb, John Colicos, Gene Evans, Eduard Franz, Victor French (2), Harold Gould, Nicholas Hammond, Richard Jaeckel, Paul Koslo, Strother Martin, Cameron Mitchell, Harry Morgan (2), George Murdock, Nick Nolte, Nehemiah Persoff, John Russell, John Saxon, William Smith, David Soul, Don Stroud, Daniel J. Travanti, Robert Urich, John Vernon, David Wayne, Van Williams, Morgan Woodward.

THE DVD SET
The prints are restored and look wonderful. In each episode and at the end of the first set of end credits, a voice-over announcer introduces the next week trailer. It features separated from the episodes and unrestored next week trailers and, also, English subtitles. As in the previous season set, you find three extras: a 15 minutes 41 discussion called Ben and Beckey Talk Gunsmoke: Season 20 in which the two hosts highlight a selection of season 20 episodes with specific guest actors, an audio commentary for “Thirty a Month and Found” by writer Jim Byrnes and film historian Ben Costello, a photo gallery.

The brand new main titles from season 20.
gunsmoke20_opening01.jpg
gunsmoke20_opening02.jpg
gunsmoke20_opening03.jpg
gunsmoke20_opening04.jpg
gunsmoke20_opening05.jpg
gunsmoke20_opening06.jpg
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
Well, let’s continue our exploration of Gunsmoke! I come out of The Long Branch and walk down the streets of Dodge City and my next stop is… season 20 and as Matt Dillon used to say to his opponents: “Hold it right there”.

GUNSMOKE • SEASON 20 (1974-1975) (24 episodes • 50 mins • color)
It’s the final season, be warned! Witness the Long Branch without Miss Kitty: weird. One odd episode (“The Guns of Cibola Blanca“) was written for and rejected by Amanda Blake from a draft presented late season 19 and was modified to fit another actress playing a saloon owner. The opening main titles is renewed, the picture medallion credits are gone—starting from season 11 and lasting nine seasons—and replaced by the leading actors showned in their characters’ daily activites (underlined by a zoom in) instead and actor James Arness looks old like John Wayne during his last period. As usual, the orchestration of the main theme music is renewed. For the anecdote, James Arness wears a blue shirt instead of the regular berry red one during certaine pisodes: “Thirty Dollars a Month and Found”, “The Wiving” and “The Colonel”. At this stage, the series looks retrograde, hybrid and clumsy because it has the old sixties framework combined with the naturalistic mid-Seventies texture, in short, the series is self-conscious. Quality collapses with the producer shift but don’t worry there are still some solid episodes under Leonard Katzman, the first producer. Amongst the many guests, here’s an early part by actor Nick Nolte in “The Tarnished Badge” and a late part in “The Iron Men” by western veteran John Russell, known for the Warner Brothers series Lawman.

Find the usual directors like the McEveety brothers (Bernard and Vincent) and one Wild Wild West artisan (Swedish-born actor Gunnar Hellström) and newcomers: actor Victor French who becomes a surrogate Robert Totten and also works on Little House on the Prairie and its shows, Gunsmoke producer Leonard Katzman, Irish-born Michael O’Herlihy returning from Gunsmoke and Rawhide and while working on Hawaii Five-O.

A semi regular named Hannah (actress Fran Ryan) appears five times and replaces Miss Kitty at the Long Branch: “The Wiving”, “Brides and Grooms”, “I Have Promises to Keep”, “The Busters”, “Manolo”. A brand new clan shows up twice this season through the Hockett family: “The Wiving” and “Brides and Grooms”. Judge Brooker appears one more time: “The Fires of Ignorance”. As in the previous season, find again the multi-part episodes: “The Guns of Cibola Blanca” and “Island in the Desert”.

Composers are expanded to four names: Bruce Broughton, Jerrold Immel, Martin L. Klein, John Parker but Martin L. Klein teams up with Bruce Broughton. Find a new supervising music editor named Robert Y. Takagi that replaces veteran Gene Feldman that starts from season 5 (1959-1960) as a music editor but also work on Rawhide from season 5 to season 8 in which he tracks many cues from Gunsmoke.

PRODUCTION TEAM
producers: Leonard Katzman and John G. Stephens
executive producer: John Mantley
associate producer: Ron Honthaner
executive story consultant: Jack Miller
director of photography: Edward R. Plante

The team is renewed: starting from season 16, assistant story consultant Paul F. Edwards vanishes, producer Leonard Katzman is replaced by John G. Stephens from episode #14 (“The Squaw”) and cinematographer Ted D. Landon is replaced by Edward R. Plante returning from the last two seasons of The Wild Wild West because he used to work with Leonard Katzman. Plante changes the look of the series by adding harsh light and sometimes chiaroscuro and achieves his series’ masterpiece: “Thirty a Month and Found”. Producer John G. Stephens, executive producer John Mantley and director of photography Edward R. Plante and many Gunsmoke crew members (writers, directors, composers) will later work on How the West Was Won (1976-1979), starring actors James Arness and Bruce Boxleitner.

CAST OF CHARACTERS
Regular cast: James Arness (Matt Dillon), Ken Curtis (Festus), Milburn Stone (Doc), Buck Taylor (Newly).

Supporting cast: Ted Jordan (Freight agent “Nathan” Burke), Woodrow Chambliss (Woody Lathrop), Robert Brubaker (Long Branch barkeep Floyd), Fran Ryan (Long Branch owner Hannah).

As usual, the strength of season 20 is the colorful guest actors that add weight to the story: see Richard Anderson, Ned Beatty, John Beck, Bruce Boxleitner, David Brian, Gary Busey, Anthony Caruso, Lee J. Cobb, John Colicos, Gene Evans, Eduard Franz, Victor French (2), Harold Gould, Nicholas Hammond, Richard Jaeckel, Paul Koslo, Strother Martin, Cameron Mitchell, Harry Morgan (2), George Murdock, Nick Nolte, Nehemiah Persoff, John Russell, John Saxon, William Smith, David Soul, Don Stroud, Daniel J. Travanti, Robert Urich, John Vernon, David Wayne, Van Williams, Morgan Woodward.

THE DVD SET
The prints are restored and look wonderful. In each episode and at the end of the first set of end credits, a voice-over announcer introduces the next week trailer. It features separated from the episodes and unrestored next week trailers and, also, English subtitles. As in the previous season set, you find three extras: a 15 minutes 41 discussion called Ben and Beckey Talk Gunsmoke: Season 20 in which the two hosts highlight a selection of season 20 episodes with specific guest actors, an audio commentary for “Thirty a Month and Found” by writer Jim Byrnes and film historian Ben Costello, a photo gallery.
Pictures of the season 20 crew.

Producer #1.

katzman20.jpg


Producer #2.
stephens20.jpg


The new cinematographer.
plante20.jpg


The new music editor.
takagi20.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jeff Flugel

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
Well, let’s continue our exploration of Gunsmoke! I come out of The Long Branch and walk down the streets of Dodge City and my next stop is… season 20 and as Matt Dillon used to say to his opponents: “Hold it right there”.

GUNSMOKE • SEASON 20 (1974-1975) (24 episodes • 50 mins • color)
It’s the final season, be warned! Witness the Long Branch without Miss Kitty: weird. One odd episode (“The Guns of Cibola Blanca“) was written for and rejected by Amanda Blake from a draft presented late season 19 and was modified to fit another actress playing a saloon owner. The opening main titles is renewed, the picture medallion credits are gone—starting from season 11 and lasting nine seasons—and replaced by the leading actors showned in their characters’ daily activites (underlined by a zoom in) instead and actor James Arness looks old like John Wayne during his last period. As usual, the orchestration of the main theme music is renewed. For the anecdote, James Arness wears a blue shirt instead of the regular berry red one during certaine pisodes: “Thirty Dollars a Month and Found”, “The Wiving” and “The Colonel”. At this stage, the series looks retrograde, hybrid and clumsy because it has the old sixties framework combined with the naturalistic mid-Seventies texture, in short, the series is self-conscious. Quality collapses with the producer shift but don’t worry there are still some solid episodes under Leonard Katzman, the first producer. Amongst the many guests, here’s an early part by actor Nick Nolte in “The Tarnished Badge” and a late part in “The Iron Men” by western veteran John Russell, known for the Warner Brothers series Lawman.

Find the usual directors like the McEveety brothers (Bernard and Vincent) and one Wild Wild West artisan (Swedish-born actor Gunnar Hellström) and newcomers: actor Victor French who becomes a surrogate Robert Totten and also works on Little House on the Prairie and its shows, Gunsmoke producer Leonard Katzman, Irish-born Michael O’Herlihy returning from Gunsmoke and Rawhide and while working on Hawaii Five-O.

A semi regular named Hannah (actress Fran Ryan) appears five times and replaces Miss Kitty at the Long Branch: “The Wiving”, “Brides and Grooms”, “I Have Promises to Keep”, “The Busters”, “Manolo”. A brand new clan shows up twice this season through the Hockett family: “The Wiving” and “Brides and Grooms”. Judge Brooker appears one more time: “The Fires of Ignorance”. As in the previous season, find again the multi-part episodes: “The Guns of Cibola Blanca” and “Island in the Desert”.

Composers are expanded to four names: Bruce Broughton, Jerrold Immel, Martin L. Klein, John Parker but Martin L. Klein teams up with Bruce Broughton. Find a new supervising music editor named Robert Y. Takagi that replaces veteran Gene Feldman that starts from season 5 (1959-1960) as a music editor but also work on Rawhide from season 5 to season 8 in which he tracks many cues from Gunsmoke.

PRODUCTION TEAM
producers: Leonard Katzman and John G. Stephens
executive producer: John Mantley
associate producer: Ron Honthaner
executive story consultant: Jack Miller
director of photography: Edward R. Plante

The team is renewed: starting from season 16, assistant story consultant Paul F. Edwards vanishes, producer Leonard Katzman is replaced by John G. Stephens from episode #14 (“The Squaw”) and cinematographer Ted D. Landon is replaced by Edward R. Plante returning from the last two seasons of The Wild Wild West because he used to work with Leonard Katzman. Plante changes the look of the series by adding harsh light and sometimes chiaroscuro and achieves his series’ masterpiece: “Thirty a Month and Found”. Producer John G. Stephens, executive producer John Mantley and director of photography Edward R. Plante and many Gunsmoke crew members (writers, directors, composers) will later work on How the West Was Won (1976-1979), starring actors James Arness and Bruce Boxleitner.

CAST OF CHARACTERS
Regular cast: James Arness (Matt Dillon), Ken Curtis (Festus), Milburn Stone (Doc), Buck Taylor (Newly).

Supporting cast: Ted Jordan (Freight agent “Nathan” Burke), Woodrow Chambliss (Woody Lathrop), Robert Brubaker (Long Branch barkeep Floyd), Fran Ryan (Long Branch owner Hannah).

As usual, the strength of season 20 is the colorful guest actors that add weight to the story: see Richard Anderson, Ned Beatty, John Beck, Bruce Boxleitner, David Brian, Gary Busey, Anthony Caruso, Lee J. Cobb, John Colicos, Gene Evans, Eduard Franz, Victor French (2), Harold Gould, Nicholas Hammond, Richard Jaeckel, Paul Koslo, Strother Martin, Cameron Mitchell, Harry Morgan (2), George Murdock, Nick Nolte, Nehemiah Persoff, John Russell, John Saxon, William Smith, David Soul, Don Stroud, Daniel J. Travanti, Robert Urich, John Vernon, David Wayne, Van Williams, Morgan Woodward.

THE DVD SET
The prints are restored and look wonderful. In each episode and at the end of the first set of end credits, a voice-over announcer introduces the next week trailer. It features separated from the episodes and unrestored next week trailers and, also, English subtitles. As in the previous season set, you find three extras: a 15 minutes 41 discussion called Ben and Beckey Talk Gunsmoke: Season 20 in which the two hosts highlight a selection of season 20 episodes with specific guest actors, an audio commentary for “Thirty a Month and Found” by writer Jim Byrnes and film historian Ben Costello, a photo gallery.

The credits for the season 20's composers.
broughton20.jpg
immel20.jpg
klein_broughton20.jpg
parker20.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jeff Flugel

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #1

“Matt Dillon Must Die”
written by Ray Goldrup
directed by Victor French
music by Jerrold Immel
guests: Morgan Woodward, Joseph Hindy, William Lucking, Henry Olek, Douglas Dirkson, Frederick Herrick, Elaine Fulkerson

Up in the mountains, young bank robber Laban Wakefield (actor Frederick Herrick) fails to shoot dead riding and tracking him down Dillon because of his faulty Winchester and runs away home where he finds nobody but a handgun and gets shot by Dillon who eventually faces the arriving family. Dillon is held prisoner in the cabin of family head Abraham Wakefield (actor Morgan Woodward) who explains the reason why he turns into a bitter outlaw: the murder of his wife by a group of lawmen. Peaceful Jacob Wakefield (actor Joseph Hindy) is ordered by his father to kill Dillon the next morning. The Wakefield bury their dead relative. After winning against Esau Wakefield (actor William Lucking) at arm wrestling, Dillon is ordered to remove his jacket and run in the cold wilderness during one hour before the start of the manhunt. Feeling humiliated, Esau Wakefield decides to track Dillon down all alone followed by the dog Shilo and the remaining hot-headed brothers …

It’s a good solo Dillon adventure and a slow-moving and almost parodic barbaric manhunter actioner, a tough skin trader family drama—the family looks prehistoric—and a revenge tale with a Gothic tapestry that has a weird twist. One silly side of this so-called tough as nail story is the dog of the Wakefield that looks like a wild Lassie! It features a freeze frame to omit the outcome during the fight between Dillon and Lassie, sorry, Shilo! As in previous episodes (see the season 19 “Like Old Times”, the season 18 “The Drummer”, the season 16 “The Noose”, the season 15 “Stryker” with actor Morgan Woodward, the season 14 “Lyle’s Kid” with actor Morgan Woodward, the season 13 “The Prodigal”), one guest character has a flash of memory and here Abraham that sees his late wife playing the harpsichord—actor Morgan Woodward acts like a broken, mad and fanatical man possessed by the painful memory of his late wife. As in the season 18 “This Golden Land”, actor Joseph Hindy plays another mild son. At times, the music score of composer Jerrold Immel reminds Lalo Schifrin’s harsh chase scores for the television series Planet of the Apes—the score is so good that it is tracked in many episodes. Note that it is the first episode directed by Gunsmoke guest actor Victor French out of five: in a way, French occupies the empty seat of another rough and gruff actor-director named Robert Totten. The cast of the Wakefield family is good: family head Abraham Wakefield (actor Morgan Woodward), his sensitive son Jacob (actor Joseph Hindy), Esau (actor William Lucking), Isaac (actor Henry Olek), Abel (actor Douglas Dirkson).

Returning guest actors: Morgan Woodward (the season 19 “ A Game of Death... An Act of Love”), Joseph Hindy (the season 18 “This Golden Land”), Henry Olek (the season 19 “Susan Was Evil”).
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #1

“Matt Dillon Must Die”
written by Ray Goldrup
directed by Victor French
music by Jerrold Immel
guests: Morgan Woodward, Joseph Hindy, William Lucking, Henry Olek, Douglas Dirkson, Frederick Herrick, Elaine Fulkerson

Up in the mountains, young bank robber Laban Wakefield (actor Frederick Herrick) fails to shoot dead riding and tracking him down Dillon because of his faulty Winchester and runs away home where he finds nobody but a handgun and gets shot by Dillon who eventually faces the arriving family. Dillon is held prisoner in the cabin of family head Abraham Wakefield (actor Morgan Woodward) who explains the reason why he turns into a bitter outlaw: the murder of his wife by a group of lawmen. Peaceful Jacob Wakefield (actor Joseph Hindy) is ordered by his father to kill Dillon the next morning. The Wakefield bury their dead relative. After winning against Esau Wakefield (actor William Lucking) at arm wrestling, Dillon is ordered to remove his jacket and run in the cold wilderness during one hour before the start of the manhunt. Feeling humiliated, Esau Wakefield decides to track Dillon down all alone followed by the dog Shilo and the remaining hot-headed brothers …

It’s a good solo Dillon adventure and a slow-moving and almost parodic barbaric manhunter actioner, a tough skin trader family drama—the family looks prehistoric—and a revenge tale with a Gothic tapestry that has a weird twist. One silly side of this so-called tough as nail story is the dog of the Wakefield that looks like a wild Lassie! It features a freeze frame to omit the outcome during the fight between Dillon and Lassie, sorry, Shilo! As in previous episodes (see the season 19 “Like Old Times”, the season 18 “The Drummer”, the season 16 “The Noose”, the season 15 “Stryker” with actor Morgan Woodward, the season 14 “Lyle’s Kid” with actor Morgan Woodward, the season 13 “The Prodigal”), one guest character has a flash of memory and here Abraham that sees his late wife playing the harpsichord—actor Morgan Woodward acts like a broken, mad and fanatical man possessed by the painful memory of his late wife. As in the season 18 “This Golden Land”, actor Joseph Hindy plays another mild son. At times, the music score of composer Jerrold Immel reminds Lalo Schifrin’s harsh chase scores for the television series Planet of the Apes—the score is so good that it is tracked in many episodes. Note that it is the first episode directed by Gunsmoke guest actor Victor French out of five: in a way, French occupies the empty seat of another rough and gruff actor-director named Robert Totten. The cast of the Wakefield family is good: family head Abraham Wakefield (actor Morgan Woodward), his sensitive son Jacob (actor Joseph Hindy), Esau (actor William Lucking), Isaac (actor Henry Olek), Abel (actor Douglas Dirkson).

Returning guest actors: Morgan Woodward (the season 19 “ A Game of Death... An Act of Love”), Joseph Hindy (the season 18 “This Golden Land”), Henry Olek (the season 19 “Susan Was Evil”).

Pictures of Abraham Wakefield (actor Morgan Woodward).
mdmustdie_01.jpg
mdmustdie_02.jpg
mdmustdie_03.jpg
mdmustdie_04.jpg
mdmustdie_05.jpg
mdmustdie_06.jpg
mdmustdie_07.jpg
mdmustdie_08.jpg
mdmustdie_09.jpg
mdmustdie_10.jpg
mdmustdie_11.jpg
mdmustdie_12.jpg
mdmustdie_13.jpg
mdmustdie_14.jpg
mdmustdie_15.jpg
mdmustdie_16.jpg
mdmustdie_17.jpg
 
Last edited:

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #2

“Town in Chains”
written by Ron Bishop
directed by Bernard McEveety
music by Jerrold Immel
guests: Ramon Bieri, Gretchen Corbett, Lance LeGault, Ron Soble, Don Stroud, Russell Wiggins , Med Flory, John Crawford, Thad Hall, Lloyd Nelson, Neil Summers, Paul C. Thomas, Francesca Jarvis, Bernice Smith, Mari Martin, Margaret L. Kingman

A band of bank robbers on the run led by Big Thicket (actor Ramon Bieri) stops by and kills some chickens for diner. Farm boy Pryor aka Sunshine (actor Russell Wiggins) states he wishes to head South against the group. Oregon (actor Lance LeGault) warns leader Big Thicket about Pryor being a lame partner and a fink. Dillon and Newly follow the tracks of the outlaws. The wild bunch tests the shooting ability of Pryor who passes the exam on a cactus. They spot abandoned army wagons and decides to wear yankee uniforms as a cover to infiltrate and rob the bank of Burry while declaring martial law. Dillon and Newly find out the army wagons and figure out the master plan. The wild bunch tells a phony story (a future Kiowas raid on the town) to sheriff Van Werkle (actor Med Flory) so that the inhabitants store their valuables in the bank and requisitions a saloon-hotel where Sunshine has an argument with saloon girl Arlene (actress Gretchen Corbett) who smells a rat. Dillon arrives in town and is arrested by Sunshine. The wild bunch encounters banker Burry (actor Paul C. Thomas) and forces him to open the safe. Dillon is eventually released by Sunshine and …

It’s a real good former confederates turned bank robbers posing as blue soldiers drama that loosely reminds Sam Peckinpah’s The Wild Bunch and a Dillon/Newly on an errand. Previous episodes highlight outlaws disguised as blue coats: see the season 12 “The Goldtakers”. The sherry on top is the reactions of two skeptical saloon characters: saloon girl Arlene (actress Gretchen Corbett) and piano player Wayne Muller (actor John Crawford). As usual, the cast of the bank robber characters is good: leader Big Thicket (actor Ramon Bieri), second-in-command Oregon (actor Lance LeGault), Foss (actor Don Stroud), hot-headed henchman Clatch (actor Ron Soble), farm boy Pryor aka Sunshine (actor Russell Wiggins).

Returning guest actors: Ramon Bieri (the season 18 “The Judgement”), Don Stroud (the season 18 “Jesse”), Russell Wiggins (the season 19 “The Deadly Innocent”), Med Flory (the season 16 “Sergeant Holly”), John Crawford (the season 19 “The Boy and the Sinner”), Lloyd Nelson (the season 19 “The Iron Blood of Courage”), Neil Summers (the season 19 “The Widow and the Rogue”), Francesca Jarvis (the season 19 “Women for Sale, Part I”).

The Wild Bunch Trailer
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #3

“The Guns of Cibola Blanca, Part I”
written by Paul Savage
directed by Gunnar Hellström
music by John Parker
guests: Harold Gould, Dorothy Tristan, Richard Anderson, James Luisi, Henry Beckman, Gloria LeRoy, Jackie Coogan, Shug Fisher, Michael Cristofer, Kurt Grayson, Rex Holman, Lloyd Nelson, Walter Escandon, Walter R. Smith, Richard Lundin

At night, henchman Evans (actor Kurt Grayson) sneaks into the hacienda of Colonel Lucius Shindrow (actor Harold Gould) and steals some valuables when a man named Ben (actor Michael Cristofer) catches him in the act. Evans stabs him and runs. Former Confederate officer Major Aaron Coltraine (actor Richard Anderson) finds dying Ben and orders his men to bring Evans back. The next days, Ivers (actor James Luisi), Badger (actor Rex Holman), Hatajo (actor Walter Escandon), the three mercenaries of Coltraine track him down and search Santa Fe while Doc Adams joins back Miss Lyla (actress Dorothy Tristan) in a cantina. At night, Ivers harasses Miss Lyla when Doc returns. The next morning, Ivers and Badger go to the public bath when Evans steps in and runs away in a hurry. Doc and Lyla take the stage to Denver when Evans shows up at the last minute. The two henchmen discover the truth about Evans and follow the stage line. At the next stop, Badger fires at Evans and Doc cures him and he is forced to go to the lair of the Comancheros along with Lyla. Evans dies. Dillon, Festus and Newly learn about the loss of the stage and investigate. Doc and Lyla are enslaved to inferior tasks when Coltraine offers Doc to heal dying Ben against the safety of Lyla. Doc meets the decaying drug addict Doctor Rhodes (actor Henry Beckman) who is incapable of curing Ben. Later on, the three lawmen posing as weapons traders encounter the gang of Ivers and neutralize it and eventually makes a deal to sell rifles to Apaches.
To be concluded next week

It’s the wild and fancy two parter a la “Women for Sale” shot on locations with a big cast: Harold Gould, Dorothy Tristan, Richard Anderson, James Luisi, Henry Beckman, Rex Holman. As in the previous “Town in Chains”, find some former confederate soldiers with a devious job. Oddly enough, we’re not introduced to Miss Lyla and that makes the story shallow and too rushed and even tough she fights the leading woman of the hacienda and has been harassed and raped by mercenary Ivers. Miss Lyla is an inadequate replacement for Miss Kitty, by the way.

Returning guest actors: Harold Gould (the season 10 “Doctor’s Wife”), Richard Anderson (the season 15 “The War Priest”), Henry Beckman (the season 19 “Cowtown Hustler”), Gloria LeRoy (the season 18 “Eleven Dollars”), Shug Fisher (the season 18 “Quiet Day in Dodge”), Rex Holman (the season 19 “The Town Tamers”), Lloyd Nelson (the season 20 “Town in Chains”), Richard Lundin (the season 19 “The Town Tamers”).
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #4
“The Guns of Cibola Blanca, Part II”
written by Paul Savage
directed by Gunnar Hellström
music by John Parker
guests: same cast as Part I

The episode starts with a trailer entitled The Story Thus Far from Part I that lasts 9 minutes 19 secondes. Coltraine asks Doc to take care of the decaying Dr. Rhodes who is about to die when Colonel Shindrow orders Doc to heal his son first. The three lawmen finally arrive at the lair of the Comancheros and start trading. Dillon poses as Mr. Smith. Festus spots Doc and pretends to be a stranger. Doc fails to back-stab Ivers with an axe. At diner, Dillon and Festus encounter Lyla and still pretends. Later that night, along with Lyla, Dillon humiliates Ivers who provokes him the next day in a knife fight. Doc shoots Ivers trying to gun down Dillon. The next night, Dillon sets the escape plan and informs Doc about it while dying Ben eavesdrops and blackmails Doc. Colonel Shindrow gives his son a glass full of laudanum to kill him. At 3 A.M., the scheme occurs but with some slight changes …

It’s the fun save time/rescue second part that plays like a season 3 action and adventure episode of The Wild Wild West because we see the escape charade and the explosion bait. The writer tends to violate the morality of Doc Adams: see the two murder attempts on Ivers and the drug given to Ben. Above all, we witness two physicians with two ethics: one corrupted (Dr. Rhodes) and one righteous (Doc Adams). The film editor uses optical zooming when Dillon and Festus spot Lyla during the diner. The weapon traders that infiltrate the lair aspect is a veiled reference to Sam Peckinpah’s The Wild Bunch. Actor Harold Gould used to appear in another CBS western series as the head of a well-guarded lair: see the season 3 episode of The Wild Wild West entitled “The Night of the Bubbling Death”.

The Wild Bunch Trailer
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #4
“The Guns of Cibola Blanca, Part II”
written by Paul Savage
directed by Gunnar Hellström
music by John Parker
guests: same cast as Part I

The episode starts with a trailer entitled The Story Thus Far from Part I that lasts 9 minutes 19 secondes. Coltraine asks Doc to take care of the decaying Dr. Rhodes who is about to die when Colonel Shindrow orders Doc to heal his son first. The three lawmen finally arrive at the lair of the Comancheros and start trading. Dillon poses as Mr. Smith. Festus spots Doc and pretends to be a stranger. Doc fails to back-stab Ivers with an axe. At diner, Dillon and Festus encounter Lyla and still pretends. Later that night, along with Lyla, Dillon humiliates Ivers who provokes him the next day in a knife fight. Doc shoots Ivers trying to gun down Dillon. The next night, Dillon sets the escape plan and informs Doc about it while dying Ben eavesdrops and blackmails Doc. Colonel Shindrow gives his son a glass full of laudanum to kill him. At 3 A.M., the scheme occurs but with some slight changes …

It’s the fun save time/rescue second part that plays like a season 3 action and adventure episode of The Wild Wild West because we see the escape charade and the explosion bait. The writer tends to violate the morality of Doc Adams: see the two murder attempts on Ivers and the drug given to Ben. Above all, we witness two physicians with two ethics: one corrupted (Dr. Rhodes) and one righteous (Doc Adams). The film editor uses optical zooming when Dillon and Festus spot Lyla during the diner. The weapon traders that infiltrate the lair aspect is a veiled reference to Sam Peckinpah’s The Wild Bunch. Actor Harold Gould used to appear in another CBS western series as the head of a well-guarded lair: see the season 3 episode of The Wild Wild West entitled “The Night of the Bubbling Death”.

The Wild Bunch Trailer

Jack Pleis - The Night of the Bubbling Death (1967)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jeff Flugel

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
¶​
¶ Next on Gunsmoke season 20, the reviews of the second disc and starting on Monday 12!​
¶ Load your guns and be ready!​
¶​
gunsmoke20_dvd02.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jeff Flugel

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #5

“Thirty a Month and Found”
written by Jim Byrnes
directed by Bernard McEveety
music by Jerrold Immel
guests: Gene Evans, Nicholas Hammond, Van Williams, Ford Rainey, Kim O’Brien, David Brian, Victor Izay, Hal Baylor, Bonnie Jedell, Henry Kendrick

In the dry fields, eight drovers bury one of their own named Curley Wills and celebrate. That night, they spend some good time at Dodge City. Because of a saloon girl named Delilah (actress Bonnie Jedell), three cow hands led by ramrod Will Parmalee (actor Gene Evans) start a fight against railroad men and end up in the jail of Dillon. At the exit of marshal’s office, the three drovers realize they lost their big money and rush to the Bull’s Head saloon to claim their money back but things turn bad: they steal the cash box containing $12 and fire at the saloon owner. Dillon and Festus go afer them. The trio pays a visit to cattle baron Tait Cavanaugh (actor David Brian) who informs them about a job at Panhandle. The young cow hand named Doak Noonan (actor Nicholas Hammond) meets his nice girlfriend Katherine (actress Kim O’Brien) and informs her about his job and that he must leave. Will Parmalee and his second Quincy (actor Van Williams) decide to rob a general store. The storekeeper (actor Ford Rainey) fires at Quincy (wounded) and Doak (dead). The duo eventually reach Texas and, above all, a cattle drive …

It’s an excellent nostalgic drovers turned outlaws by accident episode in the line of Rawhide—one of the drovers is Quincy which reminds the name of Quince from the cattle series—that raises the question of the passing of time combined with the mean of transport throughout the growing supremacy of the railroad replacing cattle drive and that question also makes a veiled reference to Sam Peckinpah’s The Wild Bunch. The episode starts with a framed picture of the wilderness which indicates that these drovers are part of history. Don’t miss the tragic Rawhide-esque outcome! Cinematographer Edward Plante does a very inspired job—as beautiful as Monroe Askins’ “The Sodbusters”—as well as composer Jerrold Immel. After “Town in Chains” with soldiers turned outlaws, find again men changing social status from conventional workers to outlaws and in both you notice a young rookie with a dilemma. Dillon wears an unusual blue shirt. The cast of the drover characters is very good: ramrod Will Parmalee (actor Gene Evans), his second Quincy (actor Van Williams) and rookie Doak Noonan (actor Nicholas Hammond).

Returning guest actors: Gene Evans (the season 19 “The Iron Blood of Courage”), Nicholas Hammond (the season 19 “Women for Sale”), Ford Rainey (the season 10 “Song for Dying”), David Brian (the season 16 “McCabe”), Victor Izay (the season 19 “Like Old Times”), Hal Baylor (the season 19 “The Boy and the Sinner”).

The Wild Bunch Trailer
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jeff Flugel

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #5

“Thirty a Month and Found”
written by Jim Byrnes
directed by Bernard McEveety
music by Jerrold Immel
guests: Gene Evans, Nicholas Hammond, Van Williams, Ford Rainey, Kim O’Brien, David Brian, Victor Izay, Hal Baylor, Bonnie Jedell, Henry Kendrick

In the dry fields, eight drovers bury one of their own named Curley Wills and celebrate. That night, they spend some good time at Dodge City. Because of a saloon girl named Delilah (actress Bonnie Jedell), three cow hands led by ramrod Will Parmalee (actor Gene Evans) start a fight against railroad men and end up in the jail of Dillon. At the exit of marshal’s office, the three drovers realize they lost their big money and rush to the Bull’s Head saloon to claim their money back but things turn bad: they steal the cash box containing $12 and fire at the saloon owner. Dillon and Festus go afer them. The trio pays a visit to cattle baron Tait Cavanaugh (actor David Brian) who informs them about a job at Panhandle. The young cow hand named Doak Noonan (actor Nicholas Hammond) meets his nice girlfriend Katherine (actress Kim O’Brien) and informs her about his job and that he must leave. Will Parmalee and his second Quincy (actor Van Williams) decide to rob a general store. The storekeeper (actor Ford Rainey) fires at Quincy (wounded) and Doak (dead). The duo eventually reach Texas and, above all, a cattle drive …

It’s an excellent nostalgic drovers turned outlaws by accident episode in the line of Rawhide—one of the drovers is Quincy which reminds the name of Quince from the cattle series—that raises the question of the passing of time combined with the mean of transport throughout the growing supremacy of the railroad replacing cattle drive and that question also makes a veiled reference to Sam Peckinpah’s The Wild Bunch. The episode starts with a framed picture of the wilderness which indicates that these drovers are part of history. Don’t miss the tragic Rawhide-esque outcome! Cinematographer Edward Plante does a very inspired job—as beautiful as Monroe Askins’ “The Sodbusters”—as well as composer Jerrold Immel. After “Town in Chains” with soldiers turned outlaws, find again men changing social status from conventional workers to outlaws and in both you notice a young rookie with a dilemma. Dillon wears an unusual blue shirt. The cast of the drover characters is very good: ramrod Will Parmalee (actor Gene Evans), his second Quincy (actor Van Williams) and rookie Doak Noonan (actor Nicholas Hammond).

Returning guest actors: Gene Evans (the season 19 “The Iron Blood of Courage”), Nicholas Hammond (the season 19 “Women for Sale”), Ford Rainey (the season 10 “Song for Dying”), David Brian (the season 16 “McCabe”), Victor Izay (the season 19 “Like Old Times”), Hal Baylor (the season 19 “The Boy and the Sinner”).

The Wild Bunch Trailer

Pictures of ramrod Will Parmalee (actor Gene Evans).
thirty_01.jpg
thirty_02.jpg
thirty_03.jpg
thirty_04.jpg
thirty_05.jpg
thirty_06.jpg
thirty_07.jpg
thirty_08.jpg
thirty_09.jpg
thirty_10.jpg
thirty_11.jpg
thirty_12.jpg
thirty_13.jpg
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #6

“The Wiving”
written by Earl W. Wallace
directed by Victor French
music by Bruce Broughton
guests: Harry Morgan, Karen Grassle, John Reilly, Linda Sublette, Herman Poppe, Michele Marsh, Dennis Redfield , Fran Ryan, Robert Brubaker, Rod McGaughy, Bobby Clark

Farmer and family man Jed Hockett (actor Harry Morgan) orders his three sons to go get a wife at Dodge City on the spot! That night, at the Long Branch, Ike (actor John Reilly), Luke (actor Herman Poppe), Shep (actor Dennis Redfield) cause havoc and a savage brawl because of three odd saloon girls. After paying the damage of the Long Branch, they abduct the same three saloon girls as well as the lady owner Hannah (actor Fran Ryan). Jed Hockett selects each woman for his sons as cattle. After many comical outbursts and refusals, they eventually get along well when Dillon stops by the farm to enforce the law…

It’s a light and comical entry about forced and clumsy hill farmer wedding. Find the return of barkeep Floyd and the first appearance of the new owner of the Long Branch named Hannah (actress Fran Ryan)—who looks like a shrewish old maid who reluctantly accepts the task of the saloon—even tough we’re introduced to Miss Lyla in the two-parter “The Guns of Cibola Blanca”. This is the second episode directed by Gunsmoke guest actor Victor French. As in “Thirty a Month and Found”, Dillon wears an unusual blue shirt. For the anecdote, actress Karen Grassle—who looks like a television Vera Miles—will become associated with the western family series Little House on the Prairie (1974) as Mrs. Caroline Ingalls as well as actor-director Victor French.

Returning guest actors: Harry Morgan (the season 18 “Milligan”), John Reilly (the season 19 “To Ride a Yeller Horse”), Herman Poppe (the season 16 “Tycoon”), Dennis Redfield (the season 19 “The Disciple”), Fran Ryan (the season 17 “The Wedding”).
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #7

“The Iron Men”
written by John Mantley
directed by Gunnar Hellström
music by Bruce Broughton
guests: Cameron Mitchell, Barbara Colby, Eric Olson, George Murdock, William Bryant, Marc Alaimo, Paul Gehrman, Alec Murdock, John Russell

Brimstone: a man named Smith (actor Cameron Mitchell)—real name Chauncey Demon, former marshal of Loredo and ex-convict—enters a cheap saloon and orders a whiskey that is refused by barkeep Luke (actor George Murdock) but he insisted violently when the sheriff (actor William Bryant) stops him and tells him to get out of town within the hour. Luke shows the sheriff the gun belt he bought from Smith who resumes to the saloon with a gold locket to buy a bottle of whiskey but still refused by Luke when gunslingers causes havoc and Luke stops them with a shotgun but they threaten him hard so Smith makes a whiskey deal to Luke and make them leave with his own handgun. The sheriff meets Dillon looking for Matt Kimball. Dillon recognizes his old partner Demon and has a talk and many drinks. The gunslingers report to their boss: cattle baron Carl Ryker (actor John Russell). The next morning, Smith awakes in a bedroom and meets his late partner Billy Carter’s wife named Kathy (actress Barbara Colby) when Dillon informs him he is promoted as the new sherrif of Brimstone and put him back on the right track. The gunslingers show up at the farm and give Demon a nasty beating. Demon must fight again is addiction to whiskey.

It’s a decent Dillon on an errand one with a serious backdrop about addiction, a team of lawmen entry and eventually a sentimental family drama: don’t miss the final showdown! It shares the same theme of the season 18 “Kimbro”, meaning a former lawman known to Dillon that turned derelict (alcoholic) but the difference lies in the leaning: Dillon tries to help him, to sober him up and reform him. As in the season opener “Matt Dillon Must Die”, the film editor applies a freeze frame when Dillon hits his former Loredo partner Demon. Pay attention to the broad day shot of Brimstone that is used for the season 20 opening titles. Note that it is written by executive producer John Mantley. Actor John Russell plays the opposite part of his popular western series Lawman: the Warner Bros’ answer to Gunsmoke back in 1958. Actor Cameron Mitchell is known for the 1967 western series The High Chaparral.

Returning guest actors: George Murdock (the season 17 “The Predators”), William Bryant (the season 17 “Alias Festus Haggin”).
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #8

“The Fourth Victim”
written by Jim Byrnes
directed by Bernard McEveety
music by Martin L. Klein & Bruce Broughton
guests: Biff McGuire, Leonard Stone, Paul Sorensen, Victor Kilian, Lloyd Perryman, Frank Janson, Al Wyatt Sr., Ben Bates, Alex Sharp

At night, a stranger in the shadow enters the Dodge House, checks the register, picks a specific room and installs his Winchester equiped with a silencer. An old drummer named Jeb Nelson (actor Frank Janson) comes out of the Long Branch, heads to the Dodge House, awakes clerk Howie and steps into his room when the stranger guns him down cold. The next morning, Festus enters the marshal’s office and awakes Dillon when Burke warns him about the victim of an assassination at the Dodge House. Both Dillon and Doc can’t find any explanations to this killing. The next night, Mr. Haines (actor Al Wyatt Sr.) comes out of the Long Branch and returns home on horse when the stranger shoots him from a rooftop. Dillon applies a curfew and forms a night posse. The stranger neutralizes a watchman and eventually guns telegrapher Henry Meeker (actor Lloyd Perryman) down on the sly from the top floor of the livery stable. Dillon and Newly check the court records and eventually spot the right trial mentioning the three victims as members of the jury and also Doc. The next night, the stranger aims at Doc who poses as a sitting duck and pretends to die but Dillon hits him in the arm. Later on, Dillon receives a telegram informing him that the suspect died three years ago in prison. The next night, worker Homer Jones (actor Victor Kilian) gets shot at the general store by the stranger. Dillon receives a message from the stranger and decides to go to a meeting while discovering the identify of the stranger …

It’s a very good spooky whodunit with a charade related to the doppelgänger of Dillon and an engrossing rooftop killer episode sustained by a good somber music score and a chiaroscuro atmosphere. We’re introduced to a rifle’s accessory: the silencer. During the analysis of the court records, Dillon mentions old regular characters from the first era: Quint Asper and Chester Goode.

Returning guest actors: Leonard Stone (the season 19 “Kitty’s Love Affair”), Paul Sorensen (the season 19 “The Widow and the Rogue”), Al Wyatt Sr. (the season 17 “Lynott”).
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
¶​
¶ Next on Gunsmoke season 20, the reviews of the third disc and starting on Monday 19!​
¶ Load your guns and be ready!​
¶​
gunsmoke20_dvd03.jpg
 

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #9

“The Tarnished Badge”
written by Robert Vincent Wright
directed by Michael O’Herlihy
music by Martin L. Klein & Bruce Broughton
guests: Victor French, Pamela McMyler, Nick Nolte, Garry Walberg, Jimmy Lydon, Eddie Firestone, Ross Elliott, Ruth McDevitt, Sam Edwards, William Katt, Hank Worden, Eddie Quillan, Steve Raines, Jon Locke, Robert Swan, Jimmy McNichol

Ludlow, Kansas: Dillon brings a young prisoner named Lonnie Weeks (actor William Katt) back to the sheriff’s office when he encounters a man forcing him into a showdown. It’s a prank done by his old friend sheriff Bo Harker (actor Victor French) who locks the prisoner up when his deputy Barney Austin (actor Nick Nolte) steps into with his girlfriend Jenny Blair (actress Pamela McMyler). Later on, Dillon notices the storekeepers are scared stiff about the sheriff and an old woman suggests that the sheriff is evil. The town council begs Dillon to get rid of his friend who tortures old people and children. Sheriff Bo Harker is fired, threatens Dillon and leaves. The next day, Dillon promotes Austin to the rank of sheriff. Life suddenly resumes to town. Out of the blue at night and as an avenging angel, Harker enters the saloon and destroys the place with his handgun and eventually kills his former deputy Austin. Lonnie Weeks warns Dillon to stop his old friend Harker …

It’s a very good traditional solo Dillon adventure and an inspired dark town tamer/fast draw lawman turned tyran entry that is well-served by the great performance of actor Victor French and the sole film-making of Michael O’Herlihy returning from season 10. Don’t miss the two iconic showdowns between Dillon and his former partner sheriff Bo Harker and the tense relation at the saloon between Barney Austin and his former boss sheriff Bo Harker when he asserts: “I don’t believe it, the puppy dog’s snapping back”. Pay attention to the symbolic of the Winchester trophy. The sheriff’s office is a re-decorated Dillon’s office and the saloon is a re-decorated Dodge House. Actor Nick Nolte will become a popular star: see his recurring part in the 1976 mini series Rich Man, Poor Man and feature films (The Deep, 48 Hours, Under Fire, Extreme Prejudice, Q&A, Cape Fear). Find the last part of Rawhide actor Steve Raines.

Returning guest actors: Victor French (the season 19 “Matt’s Love Story”), Pamela McMyler (the season 17 “No Tomorrow”), Garry Walberg (the season 19 “A Game of Death... An Act of Love: Part II”), Jimmy Lydon (the season 13 “The First People”), Eddie Firestone (the season 17 “The Bullet”), Ross Elliott (the season 5 “The Lady Killer”), Sam Edwards (the season 18 “Eleven Dollars”), Eddie Quillan (the season 17 “Lynott”), Steve Raines (the season 16 “Jenny”), Jon Locke (the season 18 “The Judgement”), Robert Swan (the season 19 “Cowtown Hustler”).
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Flashgear

JohnHopper

Screenwriter
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
1,862
Real Name
John Hopper
GUNSMOKE SEASON 20

Episode #9

“The Tarnished Badge”
written by Robert Vincent Wright
directed by Michael O’Herlihy
music by Martin L. Klein & Bruce Broughton
guests: Victor French, Pamela McMyler, Nick Nolte, Garry Walberg, Jimmy Lydon, Eddie Firestone, Ross Elliott, Ruth McDevitt, Sam Edwards, William Katt, Hank Worden, Eddie Quillan, Steve Raines, Jon Locke, Robert Swan, Jimmy McNichol

Ludlow, Kansas: Dillon brings a young prisoner named Lonnie Weeks (actor William Katt) back to the sheriff’s office when he encounters a man forcing him into a showdown. It’s a prank done by his old friend sheriff Bo Harker (actor Victor French) who locks the prisoner up when his deputy Barney Austin (Nick Nolte) steps into with his girlfriend Jenny Blair (actress Pamela McMyler). Later on, Dillon notices the storekeepers are scared stiff about the sheriff and an old woman suggests that the sheriff is evil. The town council begs Dillon to get rid of his friend who tortures old people and children. Sheriff Bo Harker is fired, threatens Dillon and leaves. The next day, Dillon promotes Austin to the rank of sheriff. Life suddenly resumes to town. Out of the blue at night and as an avenging angel, Harker enters the saloon and destroys the place with his handgun and eventually kills his former deputy Austin. Lonnie Weeks warns Dillon to stop his old friend Harker …

It’s a very good traditional solo Dillon adventure and an inspired dark town tamer/fast draw lawman turned tyran entry that is well-served by the great performance of actor Victor French and the sole film-making of Michael O’Herlihy returning from season 10. Don’t miss the two iconic showdowns between Dillon and his former partner sheriff Bo Harker and the tense relation at the saloon between Barney Austin and his former boss sheriff Bo Harker when he asserts: “I don’t believe it, the puppy dog’s snapping back”. Pay attention to the symbolic of the Winchester trophy. The sheriff’s office is a re-decorated Dillon’s office and the saloon is a re-decorated Dodge House. Actor Nick Nolte will become a popular star: see his recurring part in the 1976 mini series Rich Man, Poor Man and feature films (The Deep, 48 Hours, Under Fire, Extreme Prejudice, Q&A, Cape Fear). Find the last part of Rawhide actor Steve Raines.

Returning guest actors: Victor French (the season 19 “Matt’s Love Story”), Pamela McMyler (the season 17 “No Tomorrow”), Garry Walberg (the season 19 “A Game of Death... An Act of Love: Part II”), Jimmy Lydon (the season 13 “The First People”), Eddie Firestone (the season 17 “The Bullet”), Ross Elliott (the season 5 “The Lady Killer”), Sam Edwards (the season 18 “Eleven Dollars”), Eddie Quillan (the season 17 “Lynott”), Steve Raines (the season 16 “Jenny”), Jon Locke (the season 18 “The Judgement”), Robert Swan (the season 19 “Cowtown Hustler”).

Pictures of deputy Barney Austin (actor Nick Nolte).
tarnished_01.jpg
tarnished_02.jpg
tarnished_03.jpg
tarnished_04.jpg
tarnished_05.jpg
tarnished_06.jpg
tarnished_07.jpg
tarnished_08.jpg
tarnished_09.jpg
tarnished_10.jpg
tarnished_11.jpg
 
Last edited:

Forum Sponsors

Forum statistics

Threads
345,493
Messages
4,743,448
Members
141,464
Latest member
dan13