wall covering options, any suggestions?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Larry*S, Oct 19, 2003.

  1. Larry*S

    Larry*S Agent

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    Im in the beginning phases of construction ( 2 x 4's, sheet rock...) and Ive got the stitches and bruises to prove it.

    Anyway, Im now thinking about How id like to cover the walls. As far as I can see it, I have 3 options.

    paint
    fabric
    carpet

    any pro's or cons for the above?

    any other suggestions?

    If anyone used fabric, how did they adhere it to the wall (fabric glue, staple gun...)?

    also, what is reddish/ burgandy color most comonly used in a theater?

    larry
     
  2. andyg

    andyg Agent

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    I used two items after installing the sheetrock. For the front third of the room, I glued acoustical ceiling tiles directly to the wall. I then purchased a heavy black fabric made for upholstering furniture. I had the fabric sewn to add large pleats, giving a wave effect to the material. This was then attached floor to ceiling. The setup worked great for taming the front room reflections as well as giving light control from reflections off the screen. As an added bonus, the cost for such a wall treatment was cheap compared to other alternatives.
     
  3. Ed O'Neill

    Ed O'Neill Second Unit

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    Hey andy,

    Nice pictures. I love how you always had some chairs in the construction phases. It must be something in the water here in MA.

    I did the same thing wires,chairs, and tvs...oh my.

    I did this to figure out best speaker placement, because I kept getting conflicting suggestions .

    So when will there be another boston dvd meet.

    Ed O'Neill
    Methuen Ma
     
  4. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Larry, I used black felt (1/4" pile) on my walls from floor to ceiling all around with drapes in the back. I bought the felt at Home Depot. It's inexpensive and works perfectly. It has a rubberized backing and glues onto the walls nicely with 3M spray adhesive. Not overly absorbing it nulls reflections nicely without killing the highs. Works much better then the acoustic panels I tried at first.


    Peace Out~[​IMG]
     
  5. Terry Montlick

    Terry Montlick Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi Larry,

    If you put a layer of acoustical absorber behind fabric, you will greatly improve the acoustical quality of your home theater. Drywall, even with just thin fabric in front of it, has relatively poor acoustical absorption, and makes for a too "live" home theater. Such a theater takes high quality sound from your speakers and distorts it with a lot of reverberation. Theater acoustics are almost always the weakest link in your HT sound system.

    The standard options for doing this are:

    Fabric - Guilford of Maine FR701 series. It is specifically designed to be acoustically transparent.

    Absorption - 1 inch minimum of rigid or semirigid unfaced fiberglass or polyester batt.

    Commercial movie theaters use a minimum of 1 1/2 inches of semi-rigid fiberglass to achieve accurate acoustics.

    There are LOTS of details, but that's a quick overview.

    Regards,
    Terry
     
  6. BrianKR

    BrianKR Second Unit

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  7. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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  8. Terry Montlick

    Terry Montlick Stunt Coordinator

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    Yup, Ron-P is right. Too much mid to high frequency absorption (the kind provided by 1 1/2-inch fiberglass), and your room will sound dead. But if low frequencies are absorbed as well, the room sounds beautifully in balance.

    Commercial theaters have wall construction that adequately absorbs low frequencies. Home theaters can vary all over the place, depending how walls and ceilings are built.

    Reverberation measurements are the most reliable way to know how much of what kind of absorption to use.
     
  9. Sonnie Parker

    Sonnie Parker Second Unit

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