voltage clamping on cable vs. satellite lines on surge protectors

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by ThomasL, Dec 30, 2002.

  1. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    I noticed that Panamax makes a big deal out of the fact that their Max 8 (and other models) have a lower voltage clamping for their cable/antenna proections vs. the satellite protection. Other companies don't seem to distinguish. I'm wondering how big a difference this makes and what exactly is the difference?

    thanks,


    --tom
     
  2. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    maybe you can post a link that discusses this. only thing i'm aware of is that those units will disconnect your equipment if you've got a prolonged period of over or under voltage. if your cable or satellite is installed in the vicinity of your incoming power lines (hence next to the grounding rod outside), then you're better off sticking a surge device there and tying its ground to the grounding rod. Those units are only a few dollars. If you've done something like that, you can pretty much put whatever you want for a redundant unit.
     
  3. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    Chu,

    I can't find a specific link but I know that I read on either discountpanamax.com or panamax.com about how the Panamax models use a different clamping voltage for regular cable/antenna (.7v) vs. satellite lines (27v) and they said that other manufacturers don't distinguish between the two. I'm just wondering what exactly that means to the layman such as myself.

    thanks,


    --tom
     
  4. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    not sure since i can't seem to put my finger on the numbers they're talking about. offhand, those seem like extraordinarily low voltages though. if you find the link i'd love to see it.
     
  5. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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  6. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    yeah, i should've done a google search using the terms "satellite" and "27 volts". my best guess here is that the higher level for satellite has to do with those types of units that have motorized bases allowing you to reorient them if need be. as to how they're doing it, it's really unclear. they might be using say, gas tubes > SAD's (silicon avalanche diodes) which are then coupled to MOV's...the whole idea being to slow down the transients. the gas tube, though slow absorbs the leading edge and so forth. i'm going to hazard a guess that the coax and satellite may both have different in-line fuses also and that their differences in ratings is perhaps what's responsible for the 27 and 0.7 volts. you could always call panamax's tech support to see what they say. Panamax talks more about these different levels here. of course we could always open one up too!
     

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