Video In's/Out's on Pre/Pro's

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jerry McNutt, Sep 30, 2001.

  1. Jerry McNutt

    Jerry McNutt Auditioning

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    Hello,
    Looking for a new pre-pro or a HT receiver with pre outs for HT. So far, the Outlaw, Acurus ACT-3, and a few others are candidates. I have one question that no web site has answered so far: How do any of these handle video. Specificaly, how do they handle multi format inputs. My video monitor only has an S-VHS input. I have an S-VHS vcr and an old DVD player that both can hook up to the monitor with S-VHS cables. But, I also have an old Laser Disk player and various games (Super Nintendo and the likes) that need to hook up using composite video. Do most of the new Pre/pro's and HT receivers take composite video inputs and convert the video signal to S-VHS to output it to the monitor?
    Thanks,
    McJerry
     
  2. TomRS4

    TomRS4 Stunt Coordinator

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    Jerry,
    I'm not close to an expert on this, by any means, but I doubt that any of the pre/pros or receivers convert the video from one format to another. The way I handle it is this: My television's inputs each can handle multiple video formats (such as Component, Composite, and S-Video). By using my pre/pro to select the source, only one of the formats is active at the television, so that is the one the set uses.
    Hope this helps.
    ------------------
    Tempus Fugit
     
  3. Selden Ball

    Selden Ball Second Unit

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    Jerry,
    Video signal transcoding is available only on a few receivers. The only ones that I'm aware of are the three highest models made by Kenwood (VR-5090, VR-5700 & VR-5900) and the two highest models in Pioneer's Elite line which were just announced and not yet shipping. As best I can tell, they all include transcoding to component video, too.
    However, composite to s-video transcoders are readily available as stand-alone devices. Really inexpensive ones are available from places like Radio Shack and Walmart. ($30 or so). Intermediate cost transcoders are available in the form of consumer grade S-VHS VCRs. [​IMG] Professional grade transcoders are available from companies like Extron. They usually cost a lot more.
    I hope this helps a little.
     

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