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VHS transfer to DVD

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by BillCR, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. BillCR

    BillCR Auditioning

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    Hello:

    I hope this is the right place for this question.

    Regarding transferring tape to DVD (VCR to DVD Recorder): I recently bought a DVD recorder and integrated it into my VCR/TV/Receiver setup. Everything works fine. The only step I did not complete is the one that I think would allow me to transfer tape. Right now---the regular TV cable comes from the wall and I have routed it to the DVR---than to the VCR and on to the TV (series). The only “output” RCA type connection I have on the VCR goes to my receiver (audio) and my TV (video). I have one input available on front and one on back of the VCR.

    Now it appears that to transfer---I need to run RCA cables from the “out” on the VCR to the “in” on the DVR. Is this correct? Is there another way---like reversing it---run the “out” from the DVR to the ‘In” on the VCR? Or---does just the cable antenna hookup allow me to transfer?

    The DVR owners manual tells little about transfer.

    Thx for any help!
     
  2. Robert_J

    Robert_J Lead Actor

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    Do you have a DVR in addition to the DVD recorder? You seem to be using those two acronyms to refer to the same piece of equipment. Please list the equipment that you have. The more details the better.

    -Robert
     
  3. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
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    Bill:

    Robert's right. A DVR is a digital video recorder and is a whole separate idea from a DVD recorder.

    If you, indeed, meant DVD Recorder when you said DVR...you will need to take the VCR's RCA outputs and send them to the DVD Recorder's inputs. That will be the only way to make the transfer.

    Your coaxial TV cable is not going to be any help at all. You can daisy-chain the signal through the components to get the signal to all your pieces (as it appears you have)...but that doesn't aid transfer.

    If you are limited in your connections, you could run your VCR output to your DVD Recorder's inputs for transferring purposes and then send your DVD Recorder's outputs to the receiver and TV. Of course, to view a videotape you will just have to select the appropriate input on your DVR to allow the VCR signal to pass through.

    Good luck!
     
  4. BillCR

    BillCR Auditioning

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    My friends:

    It is a dvd recorder and my question has been answered. I figured I needed to hook it up---VCR out-----to----DVD recorder in; but, I was hoping there was another way, since my only VCR output is already in use (audio to receiver---video to TV)

    thx
     
  5. JohanD

    JohanD Stunt Coordinator

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    If your recording is infrequent, you could always just swap the cables around. It can be inconvinient but will get the job done.
     
  6. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    Any recent receiver should have video out to a monitor (your TV). You should be able to hook the inputs and outputs of both the VCR and the DVDR to the receiver. (Unless the receiver is very new, you will have to hook up the DVDR to the "VCR2" connections, because until recently, DVDs didn't record, so they had no outputs from the receiver, only inputs. This may cause some confusion, having to press "VCR2" to watch DVDs.)

    If you hook up everything this way, you can watch and record from/to either machine, without having to switch cables. The downside: perhaps some degraded video quality on the recordings, as opposed to a direct connection -- not that you'd notice; and the inability to watch either VCR or DVDR without turning on the receiver.
     

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