Vet wants to extract my cat's molar

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Patrick Sun, Mar 7, 2005.

  1. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Took the cats in for their annual checkup, and the vet is recommending that my 12 year old cat get his right upper molar extracted due to receded gums. I'm torn because he appears to be doing okay, hasn't been yelping like he's in pain when he chews or bits into the dry food, but I don't know if the extraction now is the right decision for my cat. The vet says that my cat can just chew on his left side once the molar is extracted, but I fear it'll lead to added stress and weight loss for my cat. Should I just let nature take its course, or proactively have the tooth extracted?
     
  2. Henry Gale

    Henry Gale Producer

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    Patrick,
    You've trusted this vet for how long now? Believe me, many of us understand the concern you're showing for this furry companion...but how many of the HTF community are D.V.M's?
    I'll think good thoughts.
     
  3. DaveHo

    DaveHo Supporting Actor

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    One of our cats has problems with excess tartar build-up. A few years a ago we had the vet clean his teeth, while they were in there they found a couple rotted ones and pulled them. He's doing fine. I would say the biggest risk to your cat is being put under to have the procedure done. However, as long as he is in good health that should not be a problem.

    -Dave
     
  4. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    at least one. And he owes me photos of his hot interns [​IMG]
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Well, Julian R. is a vet and a member.

    Patrick, I would hold off getting anything done just now. Hear out some more opinions. JB
     
  6. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    I'll get the results of the bloodwork they did for my cat today, so we'll see if the sedative would be a big deal for my cat at his current age. Thanks for the input.
     
  7. Julian Reville

    Julian Reville Screenwriter

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    Sorry, Philip, the hot interns took my camera away from me, after I got one too many thong shots. [​IMG]

    Patrick, most dogs and cats will not yelp in pain with tooth problems; they will simply not chew with that area, sometimes dribbling food out of their mouths. Some cats get such terrible stomatitis that the only cure is to remove all of their teeth; they still eat small kibble and soft food quite well. I agree that the most dangeraous part of this procedure is the anesthesia, but most of us use very safe gas anesthetics now. Good luck to your kitty.
     
  8. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    [​IMG]

    Thanks for your help in the other thread, piper is doing much better on the PPO. I think we're both happier.
     
  9. Chris

    Chris Lead Actor

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    Patrick-

    Luckily, having a family with two vets, I called up someone this morning and asked them about this. They of course said what I thought up front (without seeing the animal, everything is a complete guess) but that removing a molar is not so unheard of if the gumline is receding enough so as to cause infection and other problems (lesions). Sometimes, as a stop gap to prevent the spread of lesions or elevate risk of oral cancer for cats, they have done an extraction.

    Anyway, good luck!
     
  10. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Thanks for the additional input, folks. The vet did show me the receding gumline during the exam, and it wasn't too pretty, but when the vet exerted some pressure to the side of the tooth with a dental pick, it seemed to be still entrenched pretty well. I wasn't unprepared by the news, since my cat did undergo a dental cleaning about 3-4 years ago to remove as much of the placque and tartar buildup as possible. My cat does do a periodic regurge of his meals, 2-3 times/month, and it's stabilized his weight for the past 5 years or so.

    My other cat is around 7.5 years old, and his teeth looked fine (they must not be hurting him since he can eat like hungry man at a buffet, and seems to put on a pound a year).
     
  11. Ryan Tsang

    Ryan Tsang Second Unit

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    People can have chronic gum disease and tooth infection without developing symptoms. Periodontal infection is increasingly being linked to other health problems notably heart disease. I don't how this applies to animals but I'd say if the vet thinks it's safe, extract the tooth. I wonder if vets take extraoral x-rays of the mouth on such animals?? Mabe cats are too small...dogs?
     

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