Veneering question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeffrey Noel, Dec 3, 2001.

  1. Jeffrey Noel

    Jeffrey Noel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2001
    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Is it possible to "wrap" veneer around a sub box? I will be building the 142.5L EBS Adire Shiva+PR design, and will be rounding off the edges of the box. The front and back will be painted black, and I thought it would be really easy if I could just "wrap" the veneer around the outside of the enclosure.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Mike Lenthol

    Mike Lenthol Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2000
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Depends how sharp the bend is. Imagine the bend in the form of a cylinder, where's only 1/4 is exposed, I would not bend over anything smaller than 1" in ‘diameter’ or so. Quality one layer veneer with a decent paperback should work well on that, with grain running parallel to the bend of course.
     
  3. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2000
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  4. Chris Hoppe

    Chris Hoppe Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2000
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Actually, I think if you wet it down you could get away with a 3/4" radius bend. Both grain directions too. If you do it parallel to the grain, I don't think you'd even need water.
    You can get a 3/4" roundover bit for $21 at www.mlcswoodworking.com. Just bend it slowly. Contact cement would be a good method as it would bond as you bend and is not affected by moisture. Don't wet the backing.
     
  5. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 1998
    Messages:
    2,573
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Jeffrey: you certainly can bend paper-backed veneer around corners that are rounded over with a router bit. I've used 3/4" radius bits, but moved to a 1" radius and just bought a 1 1/4" radius bit. I recommend the largest radius bit you feel comfortable buying, relative to your MDF stock thickness. The tower speaker on this web site has rounded over front vertical edges and the rosewood veneer adhered just fine (solvent-based contact cement). Please excuse the low resolution photos - it's a free web space:
    http://www.geocities.com/hankbond1/My_page.html
     
  6. Jeffrey Noel

    Jeffrey Noel Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2001
    Messages:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for all the info fellas! It's greatly appreciated!
     
  7. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2000
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    One thing I thought needed mentioning is that with a bit larger than say a 3/4" (and that's really pushing it) a router table is a must. Also with larger diameter bits you really should have a variable speed router (or router speed control) to slow the bit down. I have a 1" round over bit and it's huge!
     
  8. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2000
    Messages:
    3,716
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    From one Brian to another,
    Can you use that 1" roundover bit on joints made with 3/4" MDF? I imagine if you go too big there won't be a joint left after you're finished![​IMG]
    I used a 3/4" roundover on my sub cabinets with my router going full speed (no variable speed). When I was half way down the edge my arms looked like they were covered with a 5lb. bag of flour; yellow flour that is!
    Brian
     
  9. James RD

    James RD Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2001
    Messages:
    788
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You really don't need a router table when using a 1-1 1/2" roundover bit. And a 1/2-3/4 HP single speed router will work just fine. The trick is to take off a small amount of material with each pass, starting with a portion of the cutting surface of the bit protruding through the base. Keep adjusting the base so that with each pass more material is removed. It may take four or five passes (depending on the router, the bit, and how comfortable you are with the feel) until you have the full roundover.
     
  10. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2000
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    James,

    I wholeheartedly disagree with your statement about not needing a router table for large diameter bits!!! A 3"bit running at 18,000rpms is extrememly dangerous in a hand held situation! You may not NEED a table but it sure is a lot safer. Do what you want but it is just as easy to make a makeshift table to use than to risk seriuos injury.
     
  11. James RD

    James RD Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2001
    Messages:
    788
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You do have a good point, Brian. A hand-held router with ANY bit can be dangerous. But I also think router tables can be unsafe. I have used both and with proper care I much prefer the control of a router in my hands.
     

Share This Page