VCR to AVR hookup via s-video

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeff.bart, Jan 16, 2003.

  1. Jeff.bart

    Jeff.bart Stunt Coordinator

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    I’ve got a composite vcr I want to hook up to my HK 525 avr. Since all my other devices are hooked up to the 525 via s-video, I figured I would buy a couple of composite-to-s-video cords ($80 at RadioShack) and hook up the vcr to the avr via s-video, too. Hopefully that would give my avr control over the playback and recording of the vcr.

    However, I tried a Dayton converter to hook up the vcr video output to the avr s-video input but could not get a picture (I have directv). Sound was fine.

    Has anyone here done the same and got it to work?

    Or should I instead hook up the vcr to my DirecTV box via composite connections and forego avr control. Just create a macro on my HTM MX-500 to control the vcr?

    I am also tinkering with the idea of getting a cheap JVC Super VHS with s-video jacks.

    Any guidance would be appreciated.
     
  2. David_Rivshin

    David_Rivshin Second Unit

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    Just a thought, but are you sure that cable is a composite->S-Video cable, and not an S-Video->composite cable? It's certainly much easier (and cheaper) to combine the Y/C signals than the stick a comb filter into a little cable....
     
  3. Jeff.bart

    Jeff.bart Stunt Coordinator

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    On my initial attempt, I used a passive converter from Dayton that plugged into the composite port on the vcr at one end and connected to an s-video cable at the other end. I then ran the s-video cable to the avr s-video jack.
    Dayton part
    http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showd...ID=15508&DID=7
     
  4. Dale Ridgeway

    Dale Ridgeway Stunt Coordinator

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    For the price of the svideo converter from radio shack, im sure you could find a closeout JVC SVHS VCR for around the same price. VCRs are sooo cheap right now. Ah, how times have changed.
     
  5. Doug_B

    Doug_B Screenwriter

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    I agree with David - comb filtering is not a slam-dunk function. One needs to carefully consider where the comb filtering function should be performed, based on existing equipment, cabling, additional needs, etc. If the video stays composite to the display device, then the display device performs the function. Don't assume a cable "converter" can do a decent job. In the end, one may need to compare video quality via the display's comb filtering versus another solution (e.g., SVHS VCR, sometimes a STB) to determine where to perform it. As Dale mentions, a SVHS VCR can be an inexpensive solution that may give you the cable consolidation you require and may also compete effectively against the display's comb filter.

    One related word of caution. If your source material is already in "S-Video mode" (i.e., chrominance and luminance have not been combined), don't convert it to composite along the way, if at all possible.

    Doug
     
  6. Vin

    Vin Supporting Actor

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    Jeff,
    Your link brought me to the S-video to composite converter...here's the link to the composite to S-video converter. This would plug directly into your receiver's (VCR) S-video input....the composite video cable from your VCR will then plug into the converter....no need for any additional cables. A friend of mine is using one and it works fine.
    I'm using the $20 converter from Radio Shack and it also works fine, however, besides costing more to begin with, this one requires an additional S-video cable: composite out from VCR to converter, then S-video cable from other end of converter to receiver's (VCR) S-video input. The PE converter is obviously the more economical solution.
    Vin
     
  7. Jeff.bart

    Jeff.bart Stunt Coordinator

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    Here's what I did. Went to the local Radioshack and bought a pair of their higher end FusionAV composite to S-video cables. Cost $80.

    I was reluctant to spend that much since it cost almost the price of my vcr. I thought about getting a Super VHS player, but I would have had to spend at least $130 to get a decent one locally that I could return if there was a problem ($106 online plus shipping if I wanted to take my chances).
    Besides, I like my vcr. It has features like 1-minute rewind that the cheaper S-VHS didnt have. (Also, the sub-$100 S-VHS models only had one s-video jack.)

    Anyway, hooked up the Fusion cables and it worked like a charm -- sort of. At first, I only got the picture. I couldn't record. Finally figured out that my vcr had to be set to a setting called L1 so it would not look for feeds from the TV or another source. Now I can control everything thru the AVR.

    As for picture quality, technically the Fusion cords shouldn't make the vcr playback better, but it is. Possibly that's because I upgraded my DirecTV box to s-video from composite. I am recording a better picture. Whatever the case, I'll take the better picture quality.

    Of course, all this leaves me with a new problem. Before, I could attach an emitter from the DirecTV box to the infrared receiver on the VCR and have one-button recording from DirecTV. But the vcr wont actually get a picture unless the AVR is on. So I have to make sure the AVR is on even if I won't to record when I am away for a few days.

    It's a never ending battle these days, trying to set up a recorder. Next year: the dvd recorder.

    Thanx for you help folks.
     

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