Using second receiver as an amp. or just buying a good amp.

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Ivan P, Jun 20, 2004.

  1. Ivan P

    Ivan P Stunt Coordinator

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    I am thinking to add two more front speakers, so I will need to power them separate, I have two choices, since I can't use my receiver to power them (since I am getting full advantage and using it as 7.1) I need to add amp.
    Should I buy a good amp. or should I connect my spare receiver and use it as an amp (Technics SA-DA10 5.1 with mosfet and bigger capac. 5x90W) or just sell the Technics and get HK PA2000 to do the job.

    Thanks
    Ivan
     
  2. Ivan P

    Ivan P Stunt Coordinator

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    I am thinking to add two more front speakers, so I will need to power them separate, I have two choices, since I can't use my receiver to power them (since I am getting full advantage and using it as 7.1) I need to add amp.
    Should I buy a good amp. or should I connect my spare receiver and use it as an amp (Technics SA-DA10 5.1 with mosfet and bigger capac. 5x90W) or just sell the Technics and get HK PA2000 to do the job.

    Thanks
    Ivan
     
  3. Kevin Alexander

    Kevin Alexander Screenwriter

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    You'll be much happier and get much better results using a separate outboard amp.
     
  4. Kevin Alexander

    Kevin Alexander Screenwriter

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    You'll be much happier and get much better results using a separate outboard amp.
     
  5. Ivan P

    Ivan P Stunt Coordinator

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    Well seem like the Technics is going on Ebay together with Technics DVD-Audio.
     
  6. Ivan P

    Ivan P Stunt Coordinator

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    Well seem like the Technics is going on Ebay together with Technics DVD-Audio.
     
  7. StephenHa

    StephenHa Second Unit

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    I'm using my old receiver to power my computer speakers, a popular amp we used to use at a place I worked was one for karaoke it sold for around a hundred bucks was about a hundred watts a channel, and was well built
     
  8. StephenHa

    StephenHa Second Unit

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    I'm using my old receiver to power my computer speakers, a popular amp we used to use at a place I worked was one for karaoke it sold for around a hundred bucks was about a hundred watts a channel, and was well built
     
  9. Drew_W

    Drew_W Screenwriter

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    Why are you adding two more front speakers?
     
  10. Drew_W

    Drew_W Screenwriter

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    Why are you adding two more front speakers?
     
  11. Aaron Gilbert

    Aaron Gilbert Second Unit

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    I'm with Drew. It sounds like you already are using a 7.1 speaker setup with your existing receiver, so what are the additional two speakers? I'd say perhaps Yamaha 'front effects' speakers, but I thought all the receivers with that came with amplifiers built in (albeit only 25w/ch). Or do you just have an enormous room and need more output?

    90w can be a lot of power if your speakers are quite efficient. Sometimes that can mean going to four ohms, which not all receivers like (have had a noticeable hard time with a mid-end Technics at that impedance). If you're adding eight ohm speakers though, I would say give it a try with the Technics, what do you have to lose? If it doesn't work, or not well enough for you, THEN look for an external amp.

    I actually couldn't tell a difference going from my receiver to an outboard amp with more than double the output capability, on my front L/R. But the speakers are so efficient, that it's extremely rare for me to use even half of the receiver's power ability on loud peaks, much less the amp.


    Aaron Gilbert
     
  12. Aaron Gilbert

    Aaron Gilbert Second Unit

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    I'm with Drew. It sounds like you already are using a 7.1 speaker setup with your existing receiver, so what are the additional two speakers? I'd say perhaps Yamaha 'front effects' speakers, but I thought all the receivers with that came with amplifiers built in (albeit only 25w/ch). Or do you just have an enormous room and need more output?

    90w can be a lot of power if your speakers are quite efficient. Sometimes that can mean going to four ohms, which not all receivers like (have had a noticeable hard time with a mid-end Technics at that impedance). If you're adding eight ohm speakers though, I would say give it a try with the Technics, what do you have to lose? If it doesn't work, or not well enough for you, THEN look for an external amp.

    I actually couldn't tell a difference going from my receiver to an outboard amp with more than double the output capability, on my front L/R. But the speakers are so efficient, that it's extremely rare for me to use even half of the receiver's power ability on loud peaks, much less the amp.


    Aaron Gilbert
     
  13. Drew_W

    Drew_W Screenwriter

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    Yamaha's front effects speaker amplifiers and support exist only on the highest model (Z9/Z1/etc...). David Ranada (I think) wrote a good article in Sound and Vision about the front effects speakers, and adding a second pair up front. You should dig that up and read through it.
     
  14. Drew_W

    Drew_W Screenwriter

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    Yamaha's front effects speaker amplifiers and support exist only on the highest model (Z9/Z1/etc...). David Ranada (I think) wrote a good article in Sound and Vision about the front effects speakers, and adding a second pair up front. You should dig that up and read through it.
     
  15. Ivan P

    Ivan P Stunt Coordinator

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    Well the only reason to add additional speakers on front is more like for the tweeters.
    Right now my fronts Infinity Towers have 93dbs, which one not that bad, but I need more highs.

    Technics specs says that can be run with 4/6 or 8 ohms speakers so the resistance of the speakrers are not a problem for Technics and THD is less then 0,03% which is much better then my HK right now.

    I read the artical at S&V, I am not trying to reproduce Yamaha front effect just to add some highs, I am planning the same for the surrounds too.
     
  16. Ivan P

    Ivan P Stunt Coordinator

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    Well the only reason to add additional speakers on front is more like for the tweeters.
    Right now my fronts Infinity Towers have 93dbs, which one not that bad, but I need more highs.

    Technics specs says that can be run with 4/6 or 8 ohms speakers so the resistance of the speakrers are not a problem for Technics and THD is less then 0,03% which is much better then my HK right now.

    I read the artical at S&V, I am not trying to reproduce Yamaha front effect just to add some highs, I am planning the same for the surrounds too.
     
  17. StephenHa

    StephenHa Second Unit

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    if all your looking for is highs it shouldn't be a problem
     
  18. StephenHa

    StephenHa Second Unit

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    if all your looking for is highs it shouldn't be a problem
     
  19. Aaron Gilbert

    Aaron Gilbert Second Unit

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    You could get some piezo tweeters (preferably CTS/Motorola) and wire them in parallel with your speakers. It will barely change the impedance at all, and will be a lot cheaper/simpler/smaller than adding a whole other pair of speakers, which may or may not give you the extra treble you desire. I take it turning up the treble does not produce the desired effect?

    Note that I don't really this method as permanent or ideal. I just replaced the tweeters in all seven of my speakers to get more high end, which necessitated a partial redesign of the crossover. It was a lot of work, but worth it, and not counting my labor, the cost was only about $15 per speaker.

    If your speakers use an L-attenuation network to reduce the level of the tweeter, you could remove that to boost the highs. However, this would require some knowledge of crossover wiring and probably soldering as well, and of course may void any warranties.


    Aaron Gilbert
     
  20. Aaron Gilbert

    Aaron Gilbert Second Unit

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    You could get some piezo tweeters (preferably CTS/Motorola) and wire them in parallel with your speakers. It will barely change the impedance at all, and will be a lot cheaper/simpler/smaller than adding a whole other pair of speakers, which may or may not give you the extra treble you desire. I take it turning up the treble does not produce the desired effect?

    Note that I don't really this method as permanent or ideal. I just replaced the tweeters in all seven of my speakers to get more high end, which necessitated a partial redesign of the crossover. It was a lot of work, but worth it, and not counting my labor, the cost was only about $15 per speaker.

    If your speakers use an L-attenuation network to reduce the level of the tweeter, you could remove that to boost the highs. However, this would require some knowledge of crossover wiring and probably soldering as well, and of course may void any warranties.


    Aaron Gilbert
     

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