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Using non-quality receiver to power speakers?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chris Trot, Jan 14, 2003.

  1. Chris Trot

    Chris Trot Stunt Coordinator

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    I have an 3-year old sony receiver, model str-de445 and wanted to run my CBM-170's off of this amp. I'm planning on getting a better amp for my bedroom shortly, but until then I'm stuck with this one. My question is...is running these speakers with a non-current amp going to hurt the speakers at all. I'll be using it for about 8-months or so if that means anything.
     
  2. Chris Trot

    Chris Trot Stunt Coordinator

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    Anyone...please?
     
  3. Iver

    Iver Second Unit

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    What's a "non-current amp"?
     
  4. Chris Trot

    Chris Trot Stunt Coordinator

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    My fault, I meant an amp that is not considered high-current, I'm pretty sure mine uses current, yup, just checked it's plugged in. On the side, does anyone know what the difference is?
     
  5. Tony Lai

    Tony Lai Stunt Coordinator

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    Just keep the volume down.

    Even if you use power hungry speakers like 3-4 ohm units, you should be able to run it off a cheap junk Sony receiver as long as you don't wind the volume up.

    T.
     
  6. Iver

    Iver Second Unit

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    "High current" is a marketing gimmick.

    The useful, common quantity for comparing amplifiers is their total power output in watts.

    As Ohm's Law tells us, power in watts is the product of current (in amps) and pressure (in volts): P equals I x E, or PIE.

    Thus, if you have two amps of equal power rating (in watts), and one is "high-current," that would mean it was of a proportionately lower voltage, as compared to the other amp.

    Expensive speakers have no known allergy to low-end receivers. However, if you overdrive a relatively low-powered amp (such as you might find in a low-end receiver), you can cause clipping distortion which is capable of damaging the high-frequency drivers in your speakers.

    A high-powered, high-end receiver could also damage speakers by delivering more power than they can handle. In other words, you might not want to connect, say, a Denon AVR-5803 to a Paradigm Micro and then turn the volume all the way up.

    So, in your case, as long as you keep the Sony within comfortable operating limits you're not likely to damage the speakers.
     
  7. Jason GT

    Jason GT Second Unit

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    I'd be careful evaluating receivers based soley on power [​IMG]
    There are several discussions on this site about amp power and speaker sensitivity, and are highly relevant to amp/receiver power ratings.
    What's also worth noting is that most program material, at typical listening levels, requires surprisingly little power.
    As for high current, I do no believe this to be a marketing gimmick at all. High current capacity matters, from what I understand, for instantaneous spikes, and not for nominal operation. Nominal operation in both types of amp should be roughly the same. An amp with HCC can provide sufficient power to get you through those spikes that would probably send non HCC amps into clipping.
    Consider:
    Power = Voltage * Current
    apply a load (resistance); this is how amps are rated (so and so watts across an X ohm load) so:
    By Ohm's law: Voltage = current * resistance
    thus, substituting for voltage:
    Power = Current^2 * Resistance
    Consider two amps, both that nominally operate at .5 Amp (these numbers are arbitrary), driving an 8 ohm load; in both cases they output 2 watts of power per powered channel.
    Your non-HCC amp is only capable of .75 amps of peak per channel, thus has peak output of 4.5 watts per channel.
    The HCC amp can put out 3 amps peak per channel, thus can pump out 72 watts per channel, peak.
    I am certain it is not this simple; I am not an electrical engineer. However, I am quite certain that this is the benefit of HCC amps.
     
  8. Craig_Kg

    Craig_Kg Supporting Actor

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    The "high current" thing means the amp will cope comfortably with lower impedance speakers. P=IE but E=IZ so for a lower impedance speaker, to maintain voltage (amps should act as a voltage should in theory) the amp must deliver more current. There are many reasons why amps don't act as voltage sources (power supply saturation, output device current limits, output impedance...) but an amp denoted as "high current" SHOULD behave more like a pure voltage source. Of course there is no industry spec that an amp needs to satisfy before "high current" capability can be claimed.
     
  9. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    you'll be fine so long as you don't drive your amp into clipping. why even a realistic stereo is quite musical [​IMG]
     
  10. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    I had a 475 with one pair of Paradigm Titans in my bedroom, and it couldn't handle it. It would clip rather easily. It will work, but I have no doubt you may be disappointed. I got rid of the Sony within 5 days.
     
  11. Chris Trot

    Chris Trot Stunt Coordinator

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    I doubt I'll be listening to the music very loud, so I guess from what you are saying that I won't have a problem. Any other opinions out there?
     
  12. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Since you say you intend to replace it, I'd have to say it should not be a problem in the meantime.
     

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