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Using Metal Studs for your HT?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chad Beaudin, Oct 23, 2001.

  1. Chad Beaudin

    Chad Beaudin Agent

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    I have noticed that a couple of people have used metal studs for their HT. What are the pros/cons of using these? I know they are much cheaper but I would think that they would rattle and be more difficult to deal with when trying to screw the drywall to them?
     
  2. Scott-C

    Scott-C Supporting Actor

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    One "con" that I was told is that metal channels can kill the bass response of your room if not installed properly, so you might want to confirm this and ensure they're used in the correct way if you decide to use them at all.
    ------------------
    Scott
     
  3. Kevin Potts

    Kevin Potts Second Unit

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    Cool, another discussion concerning drywall. [​IMG]
    Although I personally prefer using wood studs, there's nothing wrong with using metal studs as far as sheetrocking is concerned. I really don't know if metal will affect the sound in an adverse way or not. To me, metal is more difficult to work with when using screws than wood, but there are a lot of hangers out there who would rather work with metal over wood. It seems to be an even split as far as preference.
    If you are going to use metal studs, I would suggest using drywall adhesive on them when you hang the rock. It might help to minimize any kind of vibration or rattle that might occur.
    ------------------
    [​IMG]"See the world on the wings of rock and roll"
     
  4. Chad Beaudin

    Chad Beaudin Agent

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    Would you do the same with wood. But some sort of adhesive to keep the rock from vibrating against the stud? Also I hear alot of people using double layers of drywall. One layer of sound board and then another layer of regular drywall.
    Does the drywall go on last?
    What is the difference between the sound board and regular drywall?
    If you were going to use some sound reducing fabric on the wall would that be too much and make the room dead?
     
  5. Wade Shapiro

    Wade Shapiro Extra

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    My parents are building a house with a dedicated home theater and I have worked with the builder in designing it. The way he did the walls came from advice he got at CEDIA trade shows:
    1) First there was the standard vertical studs that formed the rooom.
    2) Then he ran metal studs horizontally across the wooden studs (I think every 12") with rubber/foam isolation pads at each place where the metal stud crossed the wooden studs.
    3) Then the first layer of sheetrock went on the metal studs with the isolation pads going between the studs and the sheetrock. I can't remember off the top of my head what kind of sheetrock this first layer was, but it was something other than standard...something more sound deadening.
    4) Then a second layer of standard sheetrock was put on top of the first layer of rock with isolation pads between.
    The reasoning behind this method of construction was that the metal and wood studs have different properties as far as vibration/reverberation and sound deadening so they work in conjunction. The isolation pads between all of the contact points are supposed to isolate the separate layers as well as get rid of any vibration possibilities.
    I don't know how well this is going to work as the room isn't even close to being finished yet. However, I know the builder did a lot of research and asked a lot of questions from HT professionals, so I hope he knew what he was doing. All I know is that the framers and sheetrock hangers hated him [​IMG] We'll see how it turns out; at the very least I don't think it would be worse than just a standard sheetrocked room...
     
  6. Kevin Potts

    Kevin Potts Second Unit

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  7. Bill Lucas

    Bill Lucas Supporting Actor

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    A double layer of sheetrock should NEVER be used on the inside walls. The walls become too rigid and sound is adversely affected. *If* you are building a "room within a room" the OUTSIDE walls should utilize a double layer of drywall. This is for soundproofing. Staggered studs are also preferable. Good luck.
     
  8. Patrick Bennett

    Patrick Bennett Stunt Coordinator

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    There are those that would disagree with you Bill (Dennis Erskine for one)
    Should you use two layers of the same thickness? Absolutely not.
    Two layers of different thicknesses (5/8", 1/2") - yes.
    ------------------
    The Bennett Home Theater
     
  9. Chad Beaudin

    Chad Beaudin Agent

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    What I was envisioning was a layer of soundboard, then a layer of drywall, then the bottom half of the wall or so would be covered with that soundproofing fabric. With 2X6 plates and staggering the studs and insulating on the inside. Does this sound adequate?
     
  10. Patrick Bennett

    Patrick Bennett Stunt Coordinator

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    The fabric you see in some of our theaters isn't soundproofing - it's acoustically transparent. It's like speaker-grille cloth. It's there as transparent (acoustically) decoration on top of the treatments underneath.
    In the case of my theater, below the chair-rail there's 1" (3/4" actual) JM Theater-Shield Plus sound-board (generally comes in rolls actually). It's black, fairly dense insulation material - somewhat like duct board although not as rigid. It has fairly specific absorption characteristics that Dennis looks for in many of his theaters.
    Above the chair-rail, there's about 1" of a batting material.
    At least according to Dennis (from my memory), you want to tame the low frequencies below ear level, deal with a little bit of the high frequencies above ear level, and still keep things relatively active (above ear level) for the surrounds to be able to work their magic.
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    The Bennett Home Theater
     
  11. Chad Beaudin

    Chad Beaudin Agent

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    Thanks for the clarification Patrick.
    Who is Dennis? Don't Stone me now!!! [​IMG]
     
  12. Patrick Bennett

    Patrick Bennett Stunt Coordinator

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    Oops, sorry.
    Dennis Erskine ( http://www.designcinema.com )
    He designed a fair number of the members' theaters, and used to be a regular around here providing all kinds of help. I see him around the AVS forum more these days, but his online time is obviously diminished from what it used to be. I'm sure he's much busier due to word of mouth.
    Anyway, he's extremely knowledgable in almost all areas of HT, and I learned early on to just shut up and listen to what he said.
    ------------------
    The Bennett Home Theater
     
  13. Bill Lucas

    Bill Lucas Supporting Actor

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    Patrick,
    I do the same thing that Dennis does for a living and I know a trick or two myself. While I respect his work I disagree that two layers of drywall on the inside walls of a home theater is ever a good idea. Regards.
     

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