using an rta to set up ht

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Stephen Matthew, Jun 22, 2002.

  1. Stephen Matthew

    Stephen Matthew Stunt Coordinator

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    im wondering what kind of response curve would be most desirable in a ht setup, im a car audio guy and i know that in a normal 2 channel setup, a flat response isnt exactly great to our ears. What kind of curves are desirable from surrounds, mains, centers and sub?? will a subwoofer recieve much gain on the low end due to the room?? im guessing it will still have to model pretty flat well down into the low end of the spectrum and use room gain to pick up only the very bottom end...

    thanks for your help
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Hi Stephen.

    There is a lot of discussion about "House Curves" over in the receivers fourm. I'll move this post over there. But I'd also suggest you search for "Behring" for the BFD that lots of people use for their sub, and of course "House Curves".
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Opps. I ment the Speakers & Subwoofer fourm.:b
     
  4. Stephen Matthew

    Stephen Matthew Stunt Coordinator

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    could you explain behring and bfd??

    thanks
     
  5. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Steven,

    Bob is referring to the Behringer Feedback Destroyer, a pro-model digital parametric equalizer that is popular with the members of this Forum, typically dedicated to the sub.

    You mentioned an RTA in your title, which indicates that you have some “heavy artillery” at your disposal, but nowhere in your post do you mention how you intend to invoke an ideal frequency response. So that leaves me a little confused. Are you intending to equalize all channels, the fronts only, the sub only? With the receiver’s tone controls, or outboard equalizers? If the latter, what kind of equalizers? It would be easier to point you in the right direction if I had a little more information.

    It’s difficult to give a pat answer for this, because unlike cars, with HT you’re dealing with drastically different room sizes, furnishings, acoustics etc. from one location to another. So the “right answer” for one person won’t work with another.

    You already know that flat in-room response doesn’t necessarily sound good. Generally speaking, a house curve like Bob mentioned (where response gently rises from high frequencies to low) usually sounds the best for the front L/R mains/sub combined. How steep the curve needs to be is dependent on the size of the room; smaller rooms need more measured low frequency response than large ones. On average, the slope will be between 2-6dB from 20kHz to the crossover point, then another 4-12dB below the crossover point to 32Hz, with response shelved below that point. You will have to conduct measurement and listening tests to determine what will sound best in your room.

    For the center you want response to mimic the L/R mains, for the sake of timbre matching (hopefully you’re using matching speakers). However, I find that voices and dialogue sounds best with the bass rolled out of the center channel, often at a higher frequency than is provided from the receiver’s crossover. This is because too many programs are poorly EQd with too much bass in the voice track. So the result of a full-range center channel is unnaturally bassy and boomy voices.

    I’ve never EQ’d rear speakers, but picture-perfect response there is not as critical as with the fronts. If you have the capability to EQ them precisely you would also want them to mimic the response of the front speakers. Unlike the center channel, letting rear response go as low as the receiver will allow is fine.

    Hope this helps get you started.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     

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